All latest openings

Stay on top of London's ever-expanding restaurant scene with our regularly updated list and never miss a restaurant launch

Updated on 14 June 2019

In London, new restaurants open every day of the week. If you're struggling to keep up with all the new openings in the capital, our one-stop-shop of all the newest openings is the place to visit. Whether it's a new small plates joint in Shoreditch or a fine-dining eatery in Mayfair, our list features every bookable restaurant that has opened its doors in London. The list is constantly reviewed and updated, meaning that you can impress your mates with your knowledge of London restaurant openings. Take a look at the list below, and get ready for that 'restaurants to visit' list on your phone to grow even longer (sorry, not sorry). 

Orasay

Orasay

31 Kensington Park Road, London, W11 2EU

Chef duo Andrew Clarke and Jackson Boxer are the men behind this Notting Hill restaurant, their third partnership following Brunswick House in Vauxhall and St Leonard’s in Shoreditch.

Orasay is named after an island found off the west coast of Scotland, spelled Orosay. The menu is inspired by the Outer Hebridean region surrounding the island, and focuses heavily on seafood. You can expect to tuck into the likes of scallops, oysters, crabs and lobster, while some produce (vegetables, honey, etc.) comes from the business’ own organic farm in West Sussex, which is also Boxer’s family home.

The simple interiors see lime-washed walls and antique French oak, while a 60-bin wine list features Euro-leaning bottles available both by the glass and carafe.

£50 - £79
British
Fish
Siren

Siren

The Goring, London, SW1W 0JW

A slightly more casual experience than the hotel’s flagship restaurant, The Dining Room, Siren offers Cornish produce crafted into simple yet elegant dishes and pretty views of The Goring’s majestic garden.

Over £80
Fish
Master Wei

Master Wei

13 Cosmo Place, London, WC1N 3AP

This Chinese restaurant, exceptionally well located for the students of UCL and SOAS, is the third site from the team behind the much-loved Xi’an Impression in Highbury, following the launch of Xi’an Biang Biang Noodles in Spitalfields in 2018.

As with its siblings, Master Wei specialises in dishes from Xi’an City in Shan Xi province in central China, and the restaurant serves many of the popular dishes seen at Xi’an Impression, alongside more traditional offerings. Master Wei also benefits from an alcohol license, so you can expect London-brewed beers.  

Under £30
Chinese
Fugitive Motel

Fugitive Motel

199 Cambridge Heath Road, London, E2 0EL

Situated in a corner unit overlooking Bethnal Green Gardens, this new all-day café/co-working space is about as east London as it’s possible to be. Founded by best friends David Burgess and Liam Tolan (both former musicians in indie bands), Fugitive Motel serves artisan coffee and freshly baked pastries by day, and craft beers, kombucha on tap, and sourdough pizza from noon until late.

Pizza
Cafes
Baba G

Baba G's

726-727 Camden Market North Yard, London, NW1 8AH

After years of popping up at London’s top street-food markets, Baba G’s has finally opened a permanent sit-down restaurant in vibrant Camden. Open for lunch and dinner seven days a week, the popular Indian-inspired street food brand will be serving up street-food favourites, including pachos (poppadom nachos), chicken tikka nuggets and Bhangra burgers, alongside some exciting new small plates inspired by their appearance on BBC’s My Million Pound Menu.

Under £30
Indian
No. Fifty Cheyne

No. Fifty Cheyne

50 Cheyne Walk, London, SW3 5LR

Formerly known as Cheyne Walk Brasserie, this long-standing Chelsea eatery now goes by the name of No. Fifty Cheyne, following an extensive refurbishment. Set across two floors and overlooking the Thames, No. Fifty features a ground-floor dining room which seats around 70, and an upstairs cocktail bar and ‘drawing room’ with space for a further 50 guests.

The restaurant serves a modern British menu which is centred on an open grill, with the kitchen headed up by chef Iain Smith (previously head chef at Jason Atherton’s Social Eating House). Dishes to try include the likes of belted Galloway beef ragout with spatzli, spicy sausage and rose harissa, or Cornish monkfish, roscoff onion and potato straws with roast chicken broth. On Sundays, guests have the option to pre-order their favourite Sunday roast, cooked especially for them – options include a whole suckling pig, a rib of beef or a whole salmon.

£50 - £79
French
Bao Borough

Bao Borough

13 Stoney Street, London, SE1 9AD

The ever-popular Bao (which already has sites in Fitzrovia and Soho) now has a third location right by Borough Market. It has branched out in its food offering as well as its location; instead of just bao buns, guests are able to enjoy various dishes from the grill, as well as late-night noodle plates with a bunch of accompaniments. What's more, there's also a hatch at the front of the restaurant serving grab-and-go dishes to take away.

But everyone is really here for the signature buns, with two recommended per person alongside two-to-three sides, ticked off on the laminated menu cards and brought out as and when they are ready by efficient, informal staff.

Stand-outs include Taiwanese fried chicken served with hot sauce - crunchy, fiery and finger-lickingly indulgent - and the spiced butter scallops, a touch of luxury in an otherwise casual meal. The signature buns didn’t disappoint either, and although the classic bao (braised pork with peanut powder) is a solid winner, it’s nothing compared to the chicken nugget bao, which comes complete with hot sauce and Sichuan mayo. 

Our only draw-back? The cocktails didn't impress; stick instead to the sake or grab a couple of Bao Oolong Lagers - just the thing to get your vocal cords lubricated ahead of belting out a power ballad in the 12-seater karaoke room in the restaurant’s basement. True to Asia's late-night bars, the room is decorated in monochrome tiles and multi-coloured disco lights.

With bookings only available for groups of five or more, queueing is still likely, but with diners seated elbow-rubbingly close to one another, you can't say they don't find room for as many customers as possible, though despite the close quarters, the mirrored walls, skylight and open kitchen mean it doesn't feel too cramped. And with prices kept refreshingly low, your wallet will be (nearly) as happy as your belly when you leave.

Under £30
Taiwanese
Xier

Xier

13-14 Thayer Street, London, W1U 3JR

This first solo project from Italian chef Carlo Scotto (ex-Murano) shuns the food of his home country in favour of best-of-British produce fashioned into some very fine-dining modern cooking. As at another contemporary take on haute cuisine, Hide in Mayfair, the restaurant operates as two distinct spaces: Xier is the tasting menu-focused first floor, while downstairs, XR has a slightly more casual, accessible and slightly cheaper offering.

We dined from the 10-course tasting menu in Xier, which lasted over four hours. Needless to say, this is occasion dining, replete with theatre, sleek service and Michelin-baiting dishes that are turned out with assembly-line precision. Prices are high, portions are small and jugs of water are kept away from your table, because pouring one’s own drink here would be unthinkable.

Despite the fussiness, there is some real flair on show. Highlights from the 10 courses included a slither of sparklingly fresh rose-cured salmon, paired with a fatty blob of foie gras which is dusted with an earthy beetroot powder. Blobs of Bramley apple dotted along the edges add extra bursts of vivid freshness.

Another stand-out is the sublime black cod, which is supremely flaky, sleek with oil and brushed with a caramel miso. The accompanying best-in-class vegetables – crunchy asparagus spears and dried parsnip crisps – only added to our enjoyment.

The reward for reaching the end of the dining marathon is a cheese course featuring mouth-puckering fizzy grapes on the side, then a selection of desserts which the menu simply labels ‘Sweet tooth’. They’re not kidding: the caramel tart comes with a sticky, sugary centre sandwiched between a chocolate top and crunchy biscuit base.

Unlike many new London restaurants, Xier is a dining experience that demands your full attention and requires you be to totally present. If you’re a fan of this increasingly rare kind of full-on fine-dining, you’ll be more than happy to give it your full attention.

Over £80
Modern European
Shola

Shola

Unit 6 Media Works, London, W12 7FQ

Shola is the Urdu word for ‘spark’ and aims to ignite Londoners’ interest in Pakistani food. The chef behind it is Aida Khan, a former banker turned Leiths School of Food and Wine student who grew up in Karachi and hosted a Pakistani TV show called ‘For The Love of Food’.

She’s brought that love to the campus-like surrounds of White City Place and if the colourful, canteen setting doesn’t at first sight scream passion, then a closer look reveals details such as covetable light fittings that will have you heading back to the office to track them down online.

Khan’s cooking, however, is a case of love at first bite. Shola roasts and grinds its spices on site and you can taste that freshness in a chicken tikka which offsets a red chilli marinade with the coolness of turmeric-infused yoghurt. Lamb shoulder dials down the heat but is no less delicious, while there are roti and paratha to scoop up the well-balanced dal.

Vegetable dishes include sautéed spinach with paneer, smashed tomatoes with curry leaves and okra fries; we enjoyed the textural jumble of aloo chaat contrasted with another small plate of crispy chicken pakora.

To drink, there are half a dozen wines available by the glass or bottle, though the lively spicing means a can of ginger beer or bottle of lager might be more appealing.

Most of the clientele on our lunch visit inevitably looked like they’d come from the surrounding offices of media companies, though Shola is well placed for a quick bite before a film at the new Electric Cinema nearby.

Several of the dishes are available as a wrap and all of it can be taken away, either for lunch al desko or al fresco in White City Place’s landscaped gardens. Even if you eat in, you may find yourself asking the staff to box it up to take home: low prices and alluring flavours make it easy to over-order.

Under £30
Indian
Fatt Pundit

Fatt Pundit

77 Berwick Street, London, W1F 8TH

This buzzy two-floor space doesn’t look like much at first glance, with its plaster-washed walls and olive-green tram chairs. But if you can overlook the basic surrounds, Fatt Pundit is a lot of fun, serving up competitively priced, tasty small plates from the far north of India and the Himalayas. 

Cheery waiters recommend starting your meal with a selection of momos, which are springy, steamed dumplings stuffed with your choice of filling. We opted for the intensely meaty and tender kid goat, pepped up with flashes of ginger and, like all the momos, accompanied by tongue-tingling chutney.

Other top shouts include crunchy deep-fried spinach slathered with natural yoghurt, plum sauce and bursts of pomegranate, while moreishly crispy chicken lollipops are given extra spice by a fiery Szechuan chutney. Don’t forget to order a portion (or two) of buttery bing bread to mop up all the sauces.

From the two desserts on offer, we’d recommend skipping the rather forgettable mango mousse for the decadent chocolate brownie served in an iron skillet. It arrives topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, which melts away when the waiter drizzles a piping hot chocolate sauce over it. Drinks wise, there are beers and a Euro-centric wine list, while anyone abstaining can make the most of a selection of fruit coolers.  

£30 - £49
Indian
St Martins Lane Kitchen

St Martins Lane Kitchen

St Martins Lane Hotel, London, WC2N 4HX

Replacing Asia de Cuba, which closed in March 2019, St Martins Lane Kitchen is a temporary east-meets-west concept which has popped at St Martins Lane hotel. The dual menu means diners can choose from a selection of pan-Asian and classic British dishes, while weekends are reserved for bottomless brunch.

£50 - £79
Pan-Asian
Fusion
Myrtle

Myrtle

1A Langton Street, London, SW10 0JL

Myrtle is the first solo restaurant from Irish chef Anna Haugh, who has made a name for herself by heading up some of the kitchens of the big names in London restaurants (London House, Bob Bob Ricard) without fully stepping into the limelight.

Myrtle, at the World’s End end of King’s Road, is very much her chance to shine, and if the narrow proportions of the two-floor restaurant speak of the constraints of a chef funding her own restaurant, details like the Galway crystal used for the Baron Albert house Champagne, the green marble bar and butter dishes, and pewter water goblets that wouldn’t look out of place in Game of Thrones speak of an attachment to Haugh’s home country that feels heartfelt rather than corny.      

Haugh’s cooking likewise takes Ireland as inspiration but filters ingredients such as Burren Smokehouse salmon and Crozier blue cheese through a modern Irish sensibility. So while potato comes with black pudding, it is delivered as an elegant cylinder of Clonakilty black pudding tied up in a thin twine of fried potato strings.

Roasted beef fillet with boxty, meanwhile, is presented as an elegant fan of sliced meat cooked medium-rare and spooned with a glossy tarragon and confit shallot jus; there’s more beef inside the boxty, a quivering dome of potato pancake that eats like a sublime savoury dumpling.   

If there are faults, it’s that the cooking displays a little too much of the intricacy learnt at the Michelin-starred likes of Pied à Terre and The Square, and while the pricing is reasonable by Chelsea standards, portion sizes seem too skimpy to encourage the sort of loyal repeat visits that the nearby likes of Medlar prove exist at this tubeless end of SW10; our most filling dish was the knockout veggie option of celeriac pithivier.     

That said, there’s generosity aplenty in the repeated offers of the homemade soda bread (made with treacle for a spoonful of sweetness), the friendly staff deliver warm, personal service while a bottle of Provencal rosé from the well-assembled wine list was perfect for a warm summer evening when the full-length windows were open on to the street.

 

 

£50 - £79
Modern European
Irish
Casa Fofo

Casa Fofo

158 Sandringham Road, London, E8 2HS

Located down a nondescript street a short walk from Hackney Downs station, Casa Fofo is a tasting menu-only neighbourhood joint overseen by former Pidgin head chef Adolfo De Cecco.

It’s a curious and intimate space, which feels a bit like dining in someone’s sparsely decorated living room. There’s an open kitchen on the ground floor and room for fewer than 20 diners across a smattering of tables, while the basement boasts a single communal table, which is better suited to groups. Minimalist interiors feature sanded-down wooden floors and exposed brick walls, but there are a few homely touches, including house plants lined up on shelves and candles on the table.

The no-choice, six-course menu features some truly cutting-edge dishes, which can be supplemented by wine pairings. We loved our helping of homemade focaccia served with a pot of luminous jalapeno butter, which had all the flavour of the chilli but not too much of its fearsome heat, while a starting snack of borage tempura was addictively crispy and finished off with wild garlic flowers.

We were also impressed by the lusciously fatty cubes of pork belly, dressed with slices of carrot and a sticky blob of black apple. To finish, a loaf of house-baked bread, which had been hollowed out and filled with slightly sour mascarpone cream, ended the meal on a high note.  

Although we enjoyed what we ate, we couldn’t help thinking that Casa Fofo still has the feel of a restaurant which hasn’t quite found its identity – some of the dishes, like a wet blob of cheese topped with peas and shallot, seemed bland, while the restaurant’s atmosphere felt too serious for the casual setting.

Despite these flaws, there are flashes of brilliance here, too. And there aren’t many places where you’ll find a tasting menu for under £40, so it’s well worth hopping on the train to Hackney if you’re in the mood for some experimental dining.

£30 - £49
Modern European
A.O.K Kitchen and Bakery

A.O.K Kitchen and Bakery

52-55 Dorset Street, London, W1U 7NQ

This all-day bar, restaurant and bakery owes a lot to sunshine, as its dishes are inspired by the sun-soaked shores of California and the Mediterranean.

The chic setting features marble floors and hand-painted silk wallpaper, while the seasonally changing menu is just as on-trend, being completely free from refined sugar and with limited amounts of dairy and gluten. Things kick off at breakfast with the likes of acai and coconut bowls, or blueberry pancakes topped with organic maple syrup and fresh berries.

Later in the day, you can snack on crudités served with a vinaigrette dip or colourful salads, while more substantial dishes include seabass ceviche, gluten-free gnocchi and barbecue lamb chops. Even the drinks menu has health-conscious diners in mind, with the offering including cocktails infused with fresh juices. 

If you’re looking for a doggy bag, head downstairs to the on-site bakery, which serves a daily selection of pastries alongside a variety of speciality breads. The bakery offers dairy and gluten-free takes on classic baked goods, while custom bakes can also be ordered for special occasions.  

£50 - £79
International
Angelina

Angelina

56 Dalston Lane, London, E8 3AH

Angelina’s shtick of blending Japanese and Italian cuisine might seem like a novel one, but it’s been tried before – in 2003, Shumi in St James’s served ‘Italian sushi’ (and was widely mocked for its efforts) while in 2016 high-end Japanese Sumosan moved from Mayfair to Knightsbridge, rebranding as Sumosan Twiga https://www.squaremeal.co.uk/restaurants/sumosan-twiga_480 and introducing alternative menus of Japanese and Italian dishes.

Here in Dalston, Angelina takes things one step further, combining elements from both culinary traditions in the same dish from a weekly changing five-plate sharing menu. The combination of cuisines is gentler than anticipated – we found what we ate was mostly Italian food with welcome notes of Japanese influence.

Take the fritto misto/tempura, which involves cime di rapa coated in a crisp and lacy batter and served with a sweet soy sauce for dipping. Elsewhere, tomato linguine is pepped up with shavings of wasabi, while dense discs of braised pork are deep-fried and coated in breadcrumbs and served with a sweet-and-sour sauce. To finish, there’s an exemplary take on a rice pudding – a creamy concoction studded with chunks of tart blood orange, pellets of pistachio and finished off with chocolate shavings.  

It’s a chic and minimalist space, featuring streaked marble tables, hanging Chinese lanterns and an open kitchen complete with counter seating. Another ace up Angelina’s sleeve is its tiny in-house cocktail bar Golden Gai, which has just six seats and operates a strict no-phones policy.

Quirky and cutting-edge without feeling gimmicky, Angelina is a welcome and well-considered addition to Dalston’s burgeoning restaurant scene. 

£30 - £49
Japanese
Italian
Gezellig

Gezellig

193-197 High Holborn, London, WC1V 7BD

Gezellig is the brainchild of a restaurant dream team, which includes restaurateur Rebecca Mascarenhas (who co-owns Elystan Street) and chef Graham Long (ex-L’Autre Pied).

Roughly translating from Dutch as 'an atmosphere which allows good times to happen', Gezellig is housed in the former Holborn Town Hall, a Grade-II listed space which features leather banquettes, deep green walls and walnut tables.

Spread over two floors, Gezellig features a 50-cover dining room on the ground floor, while the mezzanine level houses the bar area for drinking and snacks. The food is modern European with a hearty slant – expect the likes of roast loin of suckling pig with crispy belly and braised shoulder, as well as pot-roast turnip with duck hearts, liver parfait, sorrel and sweet duck broth.

Desserts include apricot and camomile tart, and a salted caramel chocolate box, while the wine list features 350 options, with 20 available by the glass from as little as £5.

£50 - £79
Modern European
Cent Anni

Cent Anni

33 High Street, London, SW19 5BY

The third restaurant of Raymond de Fazio's (the man behind Café Med in St John’s Wood and Med Kitchen in Kensington), Cent Anni is the latest Italian restaurant to open in swish Wimbledon Village. Serving up classic Italian dishes using authentic ingredients from both Italy and the UK, it's a must-try for any pasta lovers.

£30 - £49
Italian
Wild Honey St James

Wild Honey St James

8 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5NG

Anthony Demetre’s cooking remains as distinctive as ever at this reimagined version of the original Wild Honey in Mayfair. With dishes such as pistou soup - basically vegetable broth - elevated into something that tastes like a rite of spring, and sun-kissed Sardinian tomatoes that taste purely, absolutely of tomato, it's an experience we highly recommend.

£50 - £79
Modern European
Gloria

Gloria

54-56 Great Eastern Street, London, EC2A 3QR

Few restaurants successfully manage to transport you back in time without feeling like a clichéd relic from an earlier era, but this UK debut from French hospitality group Big Mamma does just that. Despite its Gallic roots, Gloria’s shtick is Italian food, billing itself as a ‘70s Capri-style trattoria’.

A tiny bar area leads into a buzzy dining room decked out in the kind of flowers, wicker furniture and other faux-distressed details that make Gloria feel like it’s been around for years. There’s another dining room in the basement, this time with a mirrored ceiling and ruched drapes that feel more like an old-school Parisian bistro, although it’s so dimly lit that you’ll need your phone torch to decipher the menu; we’d recommend you book upstairs if you’re eating during daylight hours.

The food at Gloria is, in a word, extra. The menu ripples with over-the-top, Instagram-baiting versions of Italian classics – think a lasagne which is ten layers high, or a slab of lemon meringue pie which looks like it could do serious damage to the Titanic.

Beyond the frivolity, though, there is skill. Pasta al tartufo involves bouncy ribbons of house-made malfadine pasta, rubbed with mascarpone and flecked with black truffle shavings and button mushrooms. We also loved the profiterole Napoletana – a single, gleefully rich giant profiterole which swaps out the traditional cream filling for ice cream, topped with lashings of warm chocolate sauce.

Gloria’s quirkiness – including mismatched crockery and naming a dish ‘Brexit-alia truffle’ – might prove irritating to some, but its infectiously vivacious atmosphere completely charmed us.

Under £30
Italian
Kanishka

Kanishka

17-19 Maddox Street, London, W1S 2QH

This upmarket Mayfair Indian is the result of a joint effort between renowned chef Atul Kochhar and restaurateur Tina English, and specialises in dishes from India’s lesser-known regions.

The large space is split across two floors and includes a bar, a street-facing terrace and an intimate garden room. Opulent interiors see a blue colour scheme paired with lush foliage and topiary elephants, while the menu makes use of British produce where possible.

Starters include the likes of venison tartare with mustard oil mayonnaise, naan crouton and onions, while mains feature Samundri Khazana Alleppey – a dish of pan-seared seafood, Alleppey sauce and smoked cabbage poriyal.

Desserts stick to tradition with examples including a milk-based dessert of chocolate rasmalai, while drinks are a key element here too – sip on a Roast Banana Old Fashioned or try a whisky from a selection of over 50 varieties.  

£50 - £79
Indian
Tayer + Elementary

Tayer + Elementary

152 Old Street, London, EC1V 9BW

Tayer + Elementary comes courtesy of Alex Kratena and Monica Berg, who made big names for themselves at Artesian at The Langham hotel and Himkok in Oslo respectively. Here at Tayer + Elementary they have created two distinct spaces (one casual, one more experimental) and have scoured the globe for ingredients that they’ve turned into custom-made spirits and mixers in place of household names.

 

£30 - £49
Modern European
Bars
Bun House Chinatown

Bun House Chinatown

26-27 Lisle Street, WC2H 7BA

This follow-up to Bun House on Greek Street makes for great window shopping, with big bamboo baskets steaming in full view and a line of would-be diners queuing at the counter to order.

The food is available to takeaway, which should probably have been the limit of Bun House’s ambitions; nothing about our meal felt remotely conducive to eating in, from the tiny tables and cramped chairs to the get-your-own sauces and chopsticks and the lack of crockery and glassware.

We’d have been prepared to overlook all of this, though, had the food been revelatory but what we ate was average at best. The signature doughy buns – pork, beef, chicken and lamb – are all-right enough, but too starchy to make a meal of. Pork and prawn shumai needed a hefty dab of chilli sauce to taste interesting.

Smashed cucumber is served with chilli sauce in a paper cup; another paper cup contained the best thing we ate, spongy, funky tripe scattered with coriander and chilli. Put off by the sad little mound of chicken-wing bones piled directly on the tabletop, we decided to call it a day rather than wait for a beef-brisket rice pot which showed no sign of appearing.      

This kind of homespun amateurishness would be forgivable in a street-food market at the end of a tube line, but not moments from Leicester Square in one of Europe’s biggest Chinatowns. Bun House is certainly cheap, but nothing about it made us cheerful.

 
Chinese
Dim Sum

If you love to dine out at new restaurants, our list of all the latest restaurants to open their doors in London is essential reading. Whether you're looking for a new place to eat out with your mates, a casual date spot or a restaurant for an important celebration, you'll find plenty of options here. Plus, you can click through to each individual listing to learn more about the restaurant, as well as the opening times, location, prices, cuisine and more. With our list of all the latest openings in London, you'll never be stuck for restaurant ideas ever again. So, get ready to enjoy some seriously good meals at these online bookable restaurants.