Best British restaurants in London

If you want to keep your dinner classic, head to a British restaurant. To discover the capital’s greatest, have a look at our pick of London’s best British restaurants. British food has shed its reputation for being dull and dreary and our list of must-try British restaurants in London proves it. Whether you’re looking for classic fish & chips or a hearty Shepherd’s pie, our choice of London’s best British restaurants has everything you’ll need. Scroll down to see the best British restaurants in London.  

Updated on 17 September 2018

Check out London’s excellent choice of British restaurants with SquareMeal’s selection. Every one of the restaurants featured in SquareMeal’s list of London’s best British restaurants has been tried and tested by food critics and our own customers, so check out the reviews and book a table with SquareMeal today.

Lyle

Lyle's

The Tea Building, 56 Shoreditch High Street, London, London, E1 6JJ

James Lowe’s no-nonsense restaurant strips away the fripperies of gastronomy to leave a starkly minimalistic space where disarmingly simple food does the talking. British ingredients are put to stunning use on a no-choice dinner menu.

£50 - £79
British
One michelin star
Hide Above

Hide Above

85 Piccadilly, London, W1J 7NB

The fine-dining segment of this hugely ambitious venture features tasting menus from chef Ollie Dabbous. Inventive visuals include the signature ‘nest egg’ of coddled egg and smoked butter, while wines come courtesy of Hedonism in Mayfair. 

Over £80
British
Rivington Grill Greenwich

Rivington Grill Greenwich

178 Greenwich High Road, London, London, SE10 8NN

Whether you’re chomping burgers in the bar before a film at the Picturehouse next door, or literally going the whole hog with a suckling-pig feast for 45 on the comfier mezzanine level – this modern brasserie offers a safe pair of hands in genteel SE10. Clues to the Rivington’s pedigree (owners Caprice Holdings also run The Ivy and J Sheekey; the original branch is in Shoreditch) come with a 60-strong gin list and a roll-call of British comfort food. The place-mat menu features an ‘on toast’ section (think devilled kidneys or buck rarebit) alongside the likes of a sturdy Highland venison steamed pudding, or beer-battered haddock. To match the fuss-free food, a concise wine list incorporates good-value bottles from Oregon, Lebanon and even Morocco. Weekend breakfasts, BYO Mondays and free kids’ meals also keep Greenwich folk loyal. “A perfect local restaurant for all occasions” as one reader puts it.

£30 - £49
British
St John

St John

26 St John Street, London, London, EC1M 4AY

St John’s utilitarian simplicity was revolutionary back in the day, and its ‘nose-to-tail’ concept raised a few eyebrows too. Once ahead of its time, it’s now of its time – and is still relevant. The industrial minimalism of the starkly white interior places the focus firmly on matters gastronomic (and the company you’re keeping, of course), while the menu reads like a foodie’s dream – “oh, the bone marrow and parsley”, sighs one fan. Alternatively, play it safe with a damn fine pea and ham soup or go for broke – braised cuttlefish and alexanders, lambs’ tongues with chicory and anchovy, or braised hare with swede, kid liver with turnips are “simply great”. As for pud, take your pick from the likes of quince and hazelnut pavlova or apple and blackberry pie. “Everything is good, I never know what to eat”, sums up readers’ heartfelt enthusiasm for Fergus Henderson’s trailblazer turned Michelin-starred City treasure. The wine list is exclusively French, with interesting options by the glass and bottles to take out too.

£30 - £49
British
One michelin star
Core by Clare Smyth

Core by Clare Smyth

92 Kensington Park Road, London, London, W11 2PN

Core is cor-blimey brilliant rather than a hardcore, haute-cuisine ordeal. The casual-luxe room may be gorgeous in its own right, but everyone is here for the food, especially Smyth's signature whole carrot topped with braised lamb.

Over £80
British
Anglo

Anglo

30 St Cross Street, London, London, EC1N 8UH

This pocket-sized, pared-back British bistro serves high-end food in simple surrounds. It’s overseen by rising star Mark Jarvis, whose eclectic chef CV ranges from Le Manoir to Zuma. Highlights include a petal-scattered scallop tartare.

£50 - £79
British
Blacklock Soho

Blacklock Soho

The Basement, 24 Great Windmill Street, London, W1D 7LG

As an affordable on-trend eatery with great food worth talking about, this cool basement chophouse is manna for West End diners on the prowl. Blacklock’s incognito street entrance adds to the allure, although it won’t prepare you for the rocking basement room that’s full to bursting with a garrulous young crowd. Vintage Blacklock foundry irons are used to press pork, lamb and beef chops on the charcoal grill, which also lends its smoky flavours to daily specials such as maple-cured bacon. Best of all is the menu’s all-in sharing option, which sees the day’s ‘skinny chops’ piled onto strips of toasted flatbread to catch the juices, with sides ranging from beef-dripping chips to courgettes with Doddington cheese. Cocktails start at a fiver, otherwise pick from a clutch of British beers and wines on tap. You can make a reservation (although Blacklock favours walk-ins), while the sought-after Sunday roast gets booked up months in advance.

£30 - £49
British
Bird of Smithfield

Bird of Smithfield

26 Smithfield Street, London, London, EC1A 9LB

Tommy Boland (Almeida, Tom Aikens, The Square) heads the kitchen, producing an alluring menu of modish British cooking. Our baked beetroot with celeriac and goats’ curd was a good-sized, well-balanced plate, as was the dish of fat, perfectly cooked scallops with squash purée and Jerusalem artichoke gratin. Mains tend to be big and rich: pan-fried sea bream with chanterelles and Parmesan gnocchi was delicious but intense, while roasted turbot arrived in a similarly generous portion. For pud, we recommend waiting for the light, creamy pistachio soufflé with bitter-chocolate ice cream. Open from breakfast, the five-floor establishment also houses a lounge bar, cocktail bar, private dining room and roof terrace. Service is attentive – sometimes overly so, as unnecessary top-ups filled our glasses to the brim (albeit with delicious Portuguese Chardonnay from a list starting at £20). There are worse crimes.

£50 - £79
British
The Goring Dining Room

The Goring Dining Room

The Goring, 15 Beeston Place, London, London, SW1W 0JW

A quintessentially British restaurant for a top-class family-owned British hotel, the Goring Dining Room is a real experience. Decked out in cream and gold, it manages to stay the right side of pompous thanks to whimsical cherry-tree chandeliers and keen-as-mustard service – a mood of “unrushed efficiency” prevails. Grilled Dover sole and beef Wellington are still there for the old guard, but elsewhere more on-trend dishes delight such as confit egg yolk with chicken wings and prosciutto (“a winner”), and delicate, cured sea trout tartare with myriad specialist tomatoes and seaweed vinaigrette. Roast chicken with truffled potato salad has also “pleased greatly” and we’ve been blown away by the perfectly timed cod with razor clams and shrimps. As you might expect from a Michelin-starred kitchen, it’s all very sophisticated and pretty, although “flavours and textures are a highlight”. The “incredible” cheese trolley gets rave reviews, and the wine list has everything you would expect of such a grand establishment.

£50 - £79
British
One michelin star
£30 - £49
Roganic

Roganic

5-7 Blandford Street, London, W1U 3DB

The focus at Simon Rogan’s Roganic is on supremely fresh ingredients, often sourced from the chef's own farm in Cumbria that also supplies his famous L’Enclume. Ten and 14-course tasting menus thrill with each successive plate.

Over £80
British
Quo Vadis

Quo Vadis

26-29 Dean Street, London, London, W1D 3LL

This tiny dining room is a genuine slice of old Soho and a showcase for the cooking of chef-patron Jeremy Lee, whose menu is a joyful celebration of the seasons. Expect anything from a warm salad of grouse to a strapping leg of lamb.

£30 - £49
British
The Five Fields

The Five Fields

8-9 Blacklands Terrace, London, London, SW3 2SP

This elegant neighbourhood restaurant is owned by Taylor Bonnyman, who also owns a garden in Sussex that supplies some of the ingredients for the chef’s gloriously fresh-flavoured food such as grouse with carrot, yoghurt and cucumber.

£50 - £79
British
One michelin star
Lorne Restaurant

Lorne Restaurant

76 Wilton Road, London, SW1V 1DE

Ex-River Café sommelier Katie Exton has taken full advantage of Victoria’s blossoming food scene with this 48-cover modern Brit, in collaboration with chef Peter Hall (formerly at The Square). Light-filled Lorne is a calming oasis of washed-out colours, with house plants lining the walls and a menu dedicated to seasonal, local produce. Dishes change daily, but we were impressed by an unashamedly rich starter of cuttlefish seasoned with fennel and pickled onions, coated in a creamy romesco sauce. Mains saw a generous serving of tender, corn-fed chicken, supported by a side of onion tart and a hunk of roasted cauliflower. 

Finally, a chocolate crémeux dessert avoided excessive heaviness thanks to refreshing drizzles of passion fruit and crisp mouthfuls of honeycomb: typical of what one reader calls “great on-point cooking”. Meanwhile, Kate Exton’s oenophile expertise shows in a globe-trotting list with some “spectacular” food-matching opportunities – there’s also a downstairs bar and wine cellar that’s worth perusing. With its chatty staff and truly relaxed atmosphere, Lorne is a very welcome addition to the neighbourhood.    

£50 - £79
British
Kerridge

Kerridge's Bar & Grill

10 Northumberland Ave, Westminster, London, WC2N 5AE

Celeb chef Tom Kerridge’s first London opening promises sublime food that invigorates classic British cookery through superb technique and a light touch of luxury. Try the glazed lobster omelette, as richly decadent as a soufflé.

British
Restaurant Story

Restaurant Story

199 Tooley Street, London, London, SE1 2JX

Chef Tom Sellers offers no menu as such; guests are asked for any likes or dislikes before a procession of tasting-menu size dishes arrive, although they are likely to include classics such as ‘Storeos’, an ‘Oreo’ cookie filled with cheese.

Over £80
British
One michelin star
Wiltons

Wiltons

55 Jermyn Street, London, SW1Y 6LX

Archaic, determinedly old school and one of the few restaurants where that outmoded jacket-and-tie policy still seems wholly appropriate, this impeccably groomed restaurant looks right at home among the streets of St James’s. Wiltons is a handsome fellow indeed, “a restaurant with purpose and life” – so switch off your electronic devices and tap into the velvety richness of it all. As fish sellers of yore, with a family tradition dating back to Georgian times, Wiltons still majors on the finest British seafood – some of the best oysters in town, dressed crab, Dover sole meunière, lobster Newburg et al. Meanwhile, those with other palates and preferences might prefer a bowl of beef consommé or a twice-baked Stilton soufflé ahead of a trencherman mixed grill or fallow deer with roast shallots, fennel and cherries. Lunchtime trolleys are weighed down with gargantuan roasts and other pleasurable repasts, while desserts mine a rich vein of nostalgic comfort – apple crumble with custard, bread-and-butter pudding, etc. Service is deferential to a fault, and the upper-crust wine list is generously endowed with vintage clarets and Burgundies from the great years – although its “astronomical” prices are unlikely to trouble the old brigade in their Savile Row suits. 

British
Fish
Roast

Roast

Floral Hall, Stoney Street, London, London, SE1 1TL

“What’s not to like about ‘meat and vegetables’?” quips an admirer of Roast – a determinedly patriotic eatery dedicated to the glories of traditional British cuisine. Built on a mezzanine floor in Borough Market’s iconic Floral Hall, it promises “fantastic views” from its handsome, light-filled dining room. We’ve been many times for breakfast and never been disappointed, although booking ahead is essential. If you’re more interested in lunch or dinner, you’ll find “reliable” and expertly sourced dishes prepared with a fair degree of dexterity, from Portland crab salad or Scotch eggs with piccalilli to braised ox cheek on creamed onion sauce or whole grilled sea bass with fennel and capers. The menus are keenly seasonal, so also expect spring lamb, summer fruits and game too (“this is the only place to eat grouse after the Glorious 12th”, insists one fan). “Always enjoyable” Sunday roasts naturally get the nod, and the Brit-accented drinks list is also on the money.

£50 - £79
British
Rules

Rules

35 Maiden Lane, London, WC2E 7LB

London’s oldest restaurant has been flying the flag for British dishes since 1798. Old-fashioned it may be, but there’s nothing stale about the quality of cooking – you won't find game, oysters and puddings done better anywhere.

£50 - £79
British
Cornerstone

Cornerstone

3 Prince Edward Road, London, E9 5LX

When a chef with a background in Michelin-starred kitchens chooses a location for a solo debut, Hackney Wick is unlikely to top the list – but it has for Tom Brown. The former head chef at Outlaw’s at The Capital has sited Cornerstone, his thrilling new small-plates venture, just a few minutes’ walk from the railway station among a little group of recently developed retail spaces.

Don’t be disheartened by the locality: there’s ample space for diners, and the vibe in the restaurant is cool, with black tabletops, retro wicker chairs and black walls (complete with requisite scribbles). Mercifully, the place avoids crossing over into hipster-satire territory thanks to the friendly young team at the helm. Guests are greeted by the central dining counter, behind which you’re likely to find Brown beavering away. Unsurprisingly, given the chef’s pedigree, his regularly changing menu champions seafood. The run of small plates we sampled, served in terracotta tapas dishes, were exceptional.

Our bubbly waitress recommended eight plates between two and the meal kicked off with a pair of sensational oysters, pickled for two hours in gherkin vinegar and served with a subtle horseradish cream. Next up, a mound of juicy potted shrimps arrived piled high on a warm crumpet, soaked with shrimp butter that melted into the holes. A perfectly cooked strip of succulent bream followed, elevated to luxury by hidden chunks of lobster and saffron. Desserts, too, are a force to be reckoned with. A light, fluffy pistachio cake with vanilla cream and a sticky mess of raspberries preceded a heavenly peach crumble well worth the 20-minute wait time: its crispy top layer breaking to reveal tangy cubes of fresh peach, completed by a dollop of cream and hints of lemon.

The drinks list provides admirable back-up, informed by on-trend cocktails and classy European wines, but prices as a whole can add up (£10 desserts are rare in Hackney Wick), and some diners might consider Cornerstone rather out of the way. Nevertheless, this is an accomplished, exciting debut from one of the capital’s most promising chefs – we can’t wait to see what Brown does next.

£50 - £79
Fish
Corrigan

Corrigan's Mayfair

28 Upper Grosvenor Street, London, London, W1K 7EH

This luxe flagship of Richard Corrigan features a trolley which might proffer shoulder of suckling pig or Dover sole meunière and a menu showcasing the Irish chef’s renowned game specialities such as spatchcocked grouse or roast wild duck.

£50 - £79
British
Dean Street Townhouse

Dean Street Townhouse

69-71 Dean Street, London, London, W1D 3SE

Dine in enticingly soft armchairs amid an abundance of heavy fabrics at this Soho House outpost, where comfort food is the menu’s calling card: partridge and oxtail on toast, lamb rump with grilled artichoke, plus full English breakfasts.

£50 - £79
British
The Frog Hoxton

The Frog Hoxton

45-47 Hoxton Square, London, N1 6PB

Adam Handling’s biggest operation yet features all of the chef’s signatures, from contemporary artwork and graffiti to multi-course tasting menus. Don’t miss the signature warm savoury doughnuts, oozing cheese and topped with truffle.

£30 - £49
British
Hawksmoor Seven Dials

Hawksmoor Seven Dials

11 Langley Street, London, London, WC2H 9JG

The Hawksmoor chain gets everything right, from its 35-day-aged steaks to its creative cocktails, all presented by staff with a genuine passion for service. Triple-cooked chips, mac’n’cheese or grilled bone marrow make great accompaniments.

£50 - £79
Steak
British
Boisdale of Belgravia

Boisdale of Belgravia

15 Eccleston Street, London, London, SW1W 9LX

Boasting tartan chairs, kilted waitresses, hunting trophies and a knockout selection of whisky, Boisdale isn’t shy of trumpeting its Scottish heritage. There’s more Caledonian flag-waving in the likes of haggis, salmon, oysters and game.

£50 - £79
Scottish
Steak
£50 - £79
Brat

Brat

64 Shoreditch High Street, London, E1 6JJ

'Brat' is the Northumbrian vernacular for a turbot, the house speciality of this uber-cool first solo restaurant from young Welsh chef Tomos Parry. The flip side of the menu is printed with 35 wines by the glass, including seven sherries.

£30 - £49
British
Dinner by Heston Blumenthal at Mandarin Oriental

Dinner by Heston Blumenthal at Mandarin Oriental

Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, 66 Knightsbridge, London, London, SW1X 7LA

With Heston Blumenthal’s name attached and a menu that plays with perceptions of British cookery, Dinner was always bound to be a hit. The meat fruit is legendary, there’s a view of Hyde Park and even a nitro-fuelled ice-cream cart.

£50 - £79
British
Two michelin stars
The Quality Chop House

The Quality Chop House

92-94 Farringdon Road, London, London, EC1R 3EA

There aren’t many Grade II-listed dining rooms in London, but this is one of them, with wooden booths and black-and-white tiled floors recalling its humble Victorian origins. Gloucester Old Spot pork chops with rémoulade is typical. 

£50 - £79
British
Wine Bars
The Clove Club

The Clove Club

380 Old Street, London, London, EC1V 9LT

With world-class awards reflecting its runaway success, it should come as no surprise that The Clove Club’s cooking is radical, unorthodox stuff, with the emphasis on daringly modern tasting menus involving seriously sourced ingredients.

£50 - £79
British
One michelin star
The Gilbert Scott

The Gilbert Scott

St Pancras Renaissance London Hotel, Euston Road, London, NW1 2AR

Marcus Wareing’s team more than live up to the architectural splendour of this fabulous-looking dining room. We loved duck hearts and chanterelles on smoked bone marrow, and hake with pickled egg purée, summer vegetables and black pudding.

£50 - £79
British
Afternoon tea
Native

Native

32 Southwark Street, London, SE1 1TU

Native’s mission is to serve foraged British ingredients and game, with a zero-waste ethos wherever possible. We loved the grouse tostadas, and bao buns with beef heart. Interiors reference the foraging theme with faux-derelict brick walls.

£30 - £49
British
The Game Bird at The Stafford London

The Game Bird at The Stafford London

The Stafford London, 16-18 St James’s Place , London, SW1A 1NJ

The Stafford offers something that very few London hotels think worthwhile any more: a dining room serving traditional British food. Smoked salmon, sweet and savoury puddings, Sunday roasts and prestigious red wines are specialities.

£50 - £79
British