Best Sunday Roast restaurants in London

Come rain or shine, it’s hard to beat a classic Sunday roast: the ideal comfort food, a hefty Sunday lunch makes for a great end to the week. If you’ve found yourself craving Yorkshire puddings, pick from our selection of the best Sunday roasts in London. When it comes to London’s best Sunday roast restaurants, you’ll find them right here. Are lashings of gravy your most fervent desire? Then peruse our list of great places for Sunday lunch in London and get booking.

Updated on 18 January 2018

Best Sunday Roast restaurants in London


Elystan Street

Elystan Street

£50 - £79
Modern European
One michelin star

43 Elystan Street, SW3 3NT

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The Gilbert Scott

The Gilbert Scott

£50 - £79
British

St Pancras Renaissance London Hotel, Euston Road, London, NW1 2AR

Matching the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel’s awe-inspiring grandeur would be a tall order for any restaurant, but on current form, Marcus Wareing’s team can compete with the architectural splendour of this fabulous dining room. We swooned over plates of cooked-pink duck hearts and perky chanterelles on smoked bone marrow, before chomping on red mullet and roasted prawns perched on creamy brandade, and a dish of silky hake with pickled egg purée, summer vegetables and black pudding. As for pud, we’d advise saving room for the gorgeous praline tart with caramel ice cream. Lunchtime set deals such as mackerel with gooseberries and runner beans followed by lamb shoulder with glistening pea broth are worth it just to gawp at the room’s vast architraves, glorious art and gold lamé pillars, while suited service hits an informed (but informal) sweet spot. Linger over the chunky wine list or indulge in a swift flute of something English before the train.

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Tom

Tom's Kitchen Chelsea

£50 - £79
British

27 Cale Street, London, SW3 3QP

With branches in Canary Wharf and St Katherine's Docks, Michelin-starred Tom Aikens’ boisterous, stripped-back brasserie side-line now has the makings of a mini-chain. Fans of robust British-inspired grub still congregate at the Cale Street original for bullish classics and seasonal dishes ranging from macaroni cheese, seven-hour confit lamb and shepherd’s pie to beetroot salad with pear and goats’ curd, roast wild duck with celeriac mash and port sauce or pumpkin cheesecake with spiced ice cream. Photos of ‘food hero' suppliers line the tiled walls, and the interior is a masculine (but not overbearing) mix of diminutive, tight-packed tables and long benches. Despite its clean lines and smart attributes, the place can be let down by braying noise and big bills – although premier-league Chelsea prices don't deter the crowds, who also pile in for full-English fry-ups (£13.50) and restorative weekend brunch.


Photography credit: David Griffen

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Simpson

Simpson's in the Strand

£50 - £79
British

100 Strand, London, WC2R 0EW

Along with Rules (est. 1798) and Wiltons (1840), 189-year-old Simpson’s comprises a holy trinity of Empire-era, Rule Britannia British dining. It has just re-opened after a spruce-up, and entering the stained-glass and tiled lobby is like stepping into the booking hall of a gothic Victorian railway station. The dining room itself (or ‘Grand Divan’, to give it its proper title) is even more of a spectacle, a Grade II-listed showstopper of lustrous wood panelling and wedding-cake plaster moulding, oil paintings and leather banquettes, illuminated by chandeliers (there is no natural light) and, minus the cigar smoke, immediately recognisable to former patrons Charles Dickens and Winston Churchill. The food (from a British ‘bill of fare’ rather than a French ‘menu’) has been gently updated for modern appetites, losing some of its trencherman appeal along the way. A prettily presented pulled ham-hock salad, artfully arranged beef Wellington and a light gooseberry trifle all seemed aimed more at guests from the neighbouring Savoy (of which Simpsons is part) than Billy Bunter-ish City gents, although gently warmed potted shrimps to spread onto toast and sirloin with a slab of mushroom were in the comfort food tradition of old. And we were surprised that for a restaurant that prides itself on its trolley service (roast beef and Yorkshire pud, cocktails mixed tableside), the cheese selection turned out to be five pre-plated slices, presented without explanation. Overall, with Simpson’s-branded mustard and horseradish available to buy on the way out, we left with the impression that this is heritage-trail dining rather than a piece of living history. 

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Smokehouse Islington

Smokehouse Islington

£30 - £49
Gastropub

63-69 Canonbury Road, London, N1 2DG

Part of a wee gang of three covering N1 and EC2 (The Pig & Butcher and The Princess of Shoreditch being the other two), the Smokehouse is a gastropub through and through. It doesn’t open until 5pm Monday to Friday, yet despite the lack of daytime hours it is definitely a pub, with a stonking range of beers by draught and bottle – including a great showing from London. There’s a highly serviceable European-based wine list too. Rustic-chic is the order of the day when it comes to the decor, with plenty of wood and a verdant patio garden. But although you’ll find hearty smoky dishes on the menu to match, the food is actually rather refined, with the kitchen producing foie gras ganache with peaches and granola alongside the Highland cow-burger with Korean pulled pork, or smoked lamb shoulder with polenta. We also found a genuine passion for provenance here.

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Savoy Grill at The Savoy

Savoy Grill at The Savoy

£50 - £79
Modern European

The Savoy, Strand, London, WC2R 0EU

The legendary Savoy Grill has hosted a long list of famous diners since it opened in 1889, including Oscar Wilde, Charlie Chaplin and Frank Sinatra. You'll feel like an A-lister too, seated in the plush dining room beneath glittering chandeliers: "I love the experience whenever I go here," declares one devotee. Now a Gordon Ramsay restaurant, the menu pays its dues to the Savoy's culinary heritage, featuring omelette Arnold Bennett and peach Melba (both created here), as well as French staples that would be familiar to the hotel's first chef, Escoffier. But the main event is the "wonderful meat": generous grills and chops, with classic sauces such as marrowbone and shallot, feature alongside braises, roasts and pies, plus daily treats from the trolley – Wednesday is our favourite day for lunch, when beef Wellington is the star of the show. A traditional wine list lends support, while polished staff include "a helpful and knowledgeable sommelier". In short, the Savoy Grill delivers.

 

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The Orange

The Orange

£30 - £49
Gastropub

37-39 Pimlico Road, SW1W 8NE

Attracting a younger crowd than its swanker sibling The Thomas Cubitt, this huge Belgravia gastropub earns its keep with plenty of buzz on the boozy ground floor and the wood-fired oven pumping out fresh, crisp pizzas, while the bartenders pull pints of Canopy beer and mix the odd cocktail. Upstairs, others make reservations for dinner and there’s proper table service in a serene space that resembles a country pub dining room. The kitchen does a good trade in pizzas up here too, but it also turns its hand to more cheffy dishes such as grilled sardines with coddled egg and sheep’s cheese, balsamic braised lamb pie with sour-cream mash, or gingerbread with port figs and brown bread parfait. Order ahead if you want your own joint to share for Sunday lunch. “Very moreish” says one fan, who is also quick to praise the “very accommodating, helpful and patient staff”.

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Hawksmoor Seven Dials

Hawksmoor Seven Dials

£50 - £79
Steak
British

11 Langley Street, London, WC2H 9JG

“The best steak in London, by a mile”, declares one reader, and we have to agree. The beefy Hawksmoor chain somehow manages to get everything right, from its glorious 35-day-aged steaks supplied by The Ginger Pig to its creative cocktails – all presented by staff with a genuine passion for service. It's easy to understand why there are now six branches in the capital (and another in Manchester), though this atmospheric site in the old barrel-vaulted Watney Combe Brewery is one of our favourites. Start with Old Spot belly ribs or sweetly caramelised roast scallops with white port and garlic, before taking your pick of the beefy cuts chalked up by weight on blackboards. Perfectly crisp triple-cooked chips, gut-busting macaroni cheese or grilled bone marrow make happy companions, but we urge saving some space for the addictive salted caramel Rolos too. The comfortable bar deals in burgers and lobster rolls as well as brilliant drinks, though between the hours of 3pm and 5pm Monday-Friday, you can dine from the full a la carte menu when booking in advance. Sunday lunch sees roast rump of Longhorn beef with all the trimmings for Sunday lunch. “Great for big groups and for couples”, notes one fan.

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The Garrison

The Garrison

£30 - £49
Gastropub

99-101 Bermondsey Street, London, SE1 3XB

Bermondsey favourite The Garrison is a stylish, relaxed venue that regularly plays to full houses. Mismatched chairs, slightly wobbly reclaimed tables and an eclectic array of lampshades make for a quirky space that serves eaters and drinkers equally well – there's even a highly recommended pocket-sized cinema in the basement. Sunday roasts can be rather hit and miss (we like our roasties crispy), but the evening menu shows more precise cooking – think crab on toast with watercress and samphire or glazed chicken breast with sweetcorn purée, crushed new potatoes, bacon and rosemary. To finish, the flourless chocolate cake is the stuff of pudding lovers' dreams. With decent prices, terrific breakfasts, all-day snacks, unusual beers and a decent wine list, it's easy to see why The Garrison is always packed.

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Pitt Cue

Pitt Cue

£30 - £49
North American

1 The Avenue, Devonshire Square, EC2M 4YP

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The Goring Dining Room

The Goring Dining Room

£50 - £79
British
One michelin star
£30 - £49

The Goring, 15 Beeston Place, London, SW1W 0JW

A quintessentially British restaurant for a top-class family-owned British hotel, the Goring Dining Room is a real experience. Decked out in cream and gold, it manages to stay the right side of pompous thanks to whimsical cherry-tree chandeliers and keen-as-mustard service – a mood of “unrushed efficiency” prevails. Grilled Dover sole and beef Wellington are still there for the old guard, but elsewhere more on-trend dishes delight such as confit egg yolk with chicken wings and prosciutto (“a winner”), and delicate, cured sea trout tartare with myriad specialist tomatoes and seaweed vinaigrette. Roast chicken with truffled potato salad has also “pleased greatly” and we’ve been blown away by the perfectly timed cod with razor clams and shrimps. As you might expect from a Michelin-starred kitchen, it’s all very sophisticated and pretty, although “flavours and textures are a highlight”. The “incredible” cheese trolley gets rave reviews, and the wine list has everything you would expect of such a grand establishment.

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The Jugged Hare

The Jugged Hare

£30 - £49
Gastropub

49 Chiswell Street, EC1Y 4SA

“Fantastic place, really different, but not for the faint-hearted (unless you’re a complete carnivore)”, says a fan of The Jugged Hare – a well-polished gastropub from the ETM group, who also run the nearby Chiswell Street Dining Rooms. With its stag’s heads on the bare brick walls and strung-up rabbits by the toilets, it’s an unabashed celebration of huntin’, fishin’ and shootin’, with “top-quality game” as a standout feature of the seasonal menu: grouse, wild duck and venison shank (with crushed turnip cake and Cumberland sauce) all have their moment, but don’t miss the titular jugged hare – an extremely rich concoction served with heaps of creamy mash, cabbage and bacon. Starters of Brixham scallops, black pudding and cauliflower are filling and well-seasoned, while puds include sweet banoffee pie with salted caramel drizzle. Portions are huge, wines are carefully paired to each dish, staff are “faultless” and the whole place “delivers every time”.

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Corrigan

Corrigan's Mayfair

£50 - £79
British

28 Upper Grosvenor Street, London, W1K 7EH

It’s hard to imagine Richard Corrigan seated in the restaurant that bears his name – at first glance, the blue-toned dining room and polished expanses seem too elegant to contain him. But there’s something of the chef’s robustness in a heartily seasonal menu, the odd visual pun and a chef’s trolley which might proffer shoulder of suckling pig or Dover sole meunière. Corrigan’s puts nature’s larder on the table in a way that suits “occasions when you want to be spoilt”. Influences are wide-ranging, so you might find chicken congee with scallop or roasted boneless quail with red curry and prawn toast ahead of perfectly timed Cornish cod with stuffed baby squid or one of the justly renowned game specialities: if you’re going to have hare in Mayfair, have it here, or try roast wild duck with pumpkin, celery and walnut. Presentation is appealing, but a fair distance from fussy – and the same can be said of a wine list grouped loosely by style.

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The Game Bird at The Stafford London

The Game Bird at The Stafford London

£50 - £79
British

The Stafford London, 16-18 St James’s Place , SW1A 1NJ

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Roast

Roast

£50 - £79
British

Floral Hall, Stoney Street, London, SE1 1TL

“What’s not to like about ‘meat and vegetables’?” quips an admirer of Roast – a determinedly patriotic eatery dedicated to the glories of traditional British cuisine. Built on a mezzanine floor in Borough Market’s iconic Floral Hall, it promises “fantastic views” from its handsome, light-filled dining room. We’ve been many times for breakfast and never been disappointed, although booking ahead is essential. If you’re more interested in lunch or dinner, you’ll find “reliable” and expertly sourced dishes prepared with a fair degree of dexterity, from Portland crab salad or Scotch eggs with piccalilli to braised ox cheek on creamed onion sauce or whole grilled sea bass with fennel and capers. The menus are keenly seasonal, so also expect spring lamb, summer fruits and game too (“this is the only place to eat grouse after the Glorious 12th”, insists one fan). “Always enjoyable” Sunday roasts naturally get the nod, and the Brit-accented drinks list is also on the money.

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Rules

Rules

£50 - £79
British

35 Maiden Lane, London, WC2E 7LB

As patriotic as a rousing chorus of Rule, Britannia!, this splendidly antiquated institution flies the flag for British dishes and ingredients with its proudly traditional menu. As London's oldest restaurant (opened by Thomas Rule in 1798), it would no doubt still be familiar to former patrons such as Charles Dickens, who looks down over the plush, panelled dining room from walls crowded with old sketches and paintings. Quality is consistent across the board, with confident renditions of staples such as potted shrimps, steak and kidney pie or golden syrup steamed sponge with custard. Game from the restaurant’s Lartington Estate in Yorkshire is a real draw in autumn, when dishes such as braised pheasant with lentils or roast grouse with game chips, bread sauce and redcurrant jelly make a perfect match for the savoury Rhône reds on the wine list. Expect to be treated like royalty from the moment you're greeted by the top-hatted doorman.

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Bull & Last

Bull & Last

£30 - £49
Gastropub

168 Highgate Road, London, NW5 1QS

CURRENTLY CLOSED FOR REFURBISHMENT. REOPENS AUTUMN 2019

With animal heads on its walls (nothing endangered, mind) and a bucolic finish, The Bull & Last has the feel of a country pub in the big city. The ground-floor bar can generate quite a buzz at busy times, so diners might prefer heading up the stairs to the (relative) poshness of the restaurant, where there’s more room to kick back and take in the menu.

Some appealing nourishment is on the cards, treading a line between hearty rusticity and metropolitan refinement. The charcuterie and fish boards offer sharing possibilities, or you could keep scallop ceviche all to yourself. Steak and chips or fish and chips crank up the comfort factor, with the likes of rump of English lamb with Jerusalem artichoke purée and lamb pastilla, and a dessert of black fig Tatin, revealing the culinary chops of the kitchen. London’s microbreweries get a good outing at the pumps.

 

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Claude Bosi at Bibendum

Claude Bosi at Bibendum

French
Two michelin stars
£50 - £79

Michelin House, 81 Fulham Road, London, SW3 6RD

The latest iteration of iconic Michelin House unites two legends of the London restaurant scene: Bibendum’s co-founder Sir Terence Conran and chef Claude Bosi (formerly of two-Michelin-starred Hibiscus). Here in Chelsea, Bosi’s cooking is a little more relaxed, although the style is definitely more Hibiscus than Bibendum – witness clever amuse-bouches of pissaladière fashioned into lifelike ‘olives’ or eggshells filled with mushroom duxelles, coconut foam and curry powder. However, you’ll also encounter whopping stalks of intensely flavoured green and white asparagus, chicken that tastes of a life well lived and, best of all, a Staub pan brimming with chunky, funky tripe and cuttlefish gratin, plus hefty slices of pig’s ear and ham cake on the side: simple dishes elevated to the sublime by a kitchen versed in skilful technique. Prices are as unremittingly high as ever, although a set lunch and Sunday roasts are an attempt to make this special-occasion destination work for locals as well. But Bibendum’s food is only half the story: few dining rooms in London give such unremitting life-affirming pleasure, especially when the light is streaming through those famous stained-glass depictions of the Michelin man.         

 

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Dean Street Townhouse

Dean Street Townhouse

£50 - £79
British

69-71 Dean Street, London, W1D 3SE

Recently bolstered by nearby Café Monico, Soho House’s presence hereabouts is pretty strong, with its backbone being this classy British workhorse. Dine in enticingly soft armchairs, amid an abundance of heavy fabrics with low ceilings helping to absorb the chatter that constantly zips across the glowing room from the rammed wooden bar. Atmosphere is Townhouse’s trump card, so the menu plays it simple with lots of comfort on offer – from delectable lamb rump with grilled artichoke or partridge and oxtail on toast (lifted by the juice of blackcurrants), to salads of perhaps chicory, squash and walnut. It’s all thoroughly hearty, seasonal and rather pricey, although a full English for less than a tenner explains why breakfast is so popular here. Service is predictably cosseting, and a broad wine list should reveal something for most tastes. There’s an adjacent, cloistered room for those seeking a more muffled evening, but this “always entertaining” restaurant is best for higher tempo occasions.

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Blacklock Soho

Blacklock Soho

£30 - £49
British

The Basement, 24 Great Windmill Street, London, W1D 7LG

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Foxlow Clerkenwell

Foxlow Clerkenwell

£30 - £49
International

69-73 St John Street, London, EC1M 4AY

Foxlow is the kind of joint that every neighbourhood should have. Friendly service, a relaxed atmosphere and crowd-pleasing dishes are hallmarks of this mini-chain, which is a spin-off from the mighty Hawksmoor dynasty set up by Will Beckett and Huw Gott. The duo have a knack for creating venues with shared style, but without cookie-cutter sameness, giving each branch of Foxlow a unique character. Menus major on popular chicken and steak options - think finger-licking Tamworth spare ribs with green slaw, a juicy chicken burger with avocado, and perfectly cooked sirloin steak with fries and béarnaise - plus interesting veggie choices, such as spice-roasted cauliflower with chickpeas, wilted spinach and curried aubergine sauce. Separate kids’ menus, good value express deals (two courses for £12) and the popular brunch menu score further points with readers; with one fan declaring it “the best brunch ever!” Drinks meanwhile range from creative softs, like fresh grapefruit soda, to craft beers and well-priced wines. Meanwhile cocktails, including the Hawksmoor classic Shaky Pete’s Ginger Brew, are impeccably made. 

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Oblix at The Shard

Oblix at The Shard

£50 - £79
International

Level 32, The Shard, 31 St Thomas Street, London, SE1 9RY

High in the sky above the sweeping London landscape sits Oblix, one of a handful of restaurants in tourist magnet The Shard. Boasting truly stunning views of the capital, alongside a menu of “first class” food, it has long been a favourite among SquareMeal readers.

 

At Oblix, moody modern aesthetics (the reception desk is in almost complete darkness) soon give way to truly stunning panoramic vistas. Owner Rainer Becker is better known for Asian-themed Zuma and Roka, but Oblix is more firmly rooted in Western gastronomy. The menu kicks off with snacks and small plates, including a decadent and crisp truffled flatbread which is topped with shavings of pancetta and flakes of ricotta. Elsewhere, try springy crispy squid pepped up with chilli and lime, or perhaps a super fresh and creamy lobster and clam linguini.

 

Sizeable mains come from the in-house Josper grill, rotisserie and wood-fired oven – think steaks in various sizes served alongside thick-cut chips and helpings of rich mac ‘n’ cheese, and a tender helping of duck with a crispy skin, dipped in a vibrant mango sauce. For pudding, the dessert platter is surely the only way to go, featuring miniature versions of Oblix’s entire dessert menu, including a bar of chocolate topped with crunchy bourbon ice cream, and a fluffy slice of New York cheesecake.

 

If dinner reservations prove hard to book, Oblix also offers a weekend brunch menu complete with an extensive dessert station, and a luxe Sunday lunch featuring the likes of lamb rump with puy lentils, parsley and mint. For the budget minded, a “good value” set lunch menu offers an affordable way in.

 

 

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Rivington Grill Greenwich

Rivington Grill Greenwich

£30 - £49
British

178 Greenwich High Road, London, SE10 8NN

Whether you’re chomping burgers in the bar before a film at the Picturehouse next door, or literally going the whole hog with a suckling-pig feast for 45 on the comfier mezzanine level – this modern brasserie offers a safe pair of hands in genteel SE10. Clues to the Rivington’s pedigree (owners Caprice Holdings also run The Ivy and J Sheekey; the original branch is in Shoreditch) come with a 60-strong gin list and a roll-call of British comfort food. The place-mat menu features an ‘on toast’ section (think devilled kidneys or buck rarebit) alongside the likes of a sturdy Highland venison steamed pudding, or beer-battered haddock. To match the fuss-free food, a concise wine list incorporates good-value bottles from Oregon, Lebanon and even Morocco. Weekend breakfasts, BYO Mondays and free kids’ meals also keep Greenwich folk loyal. “A perfect local restaurant for all occasions” as one reader puts it.

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The Colony Grill Room at The Beaumont

The Colony Grill Room at The Beaumont

£50 - £79
North American
International

The Beaumont, 8 Balderton Street, London, W1K 6TF

Elegance and a warm welcome come as standard at this upmarket hotel grill room, which has powerful echoes of New York’s old-timers with its art-deco murals and framed photographic portraits. The buzz here lasts all day from breakfast to midnight – although the Colony’s comfort food comes with a distinctly American twang.

On the carte, chicken pot pie and macaroni cheese vie for attention with buttermilk fried chicken and Cajun-spiced swordfish, while breakfast brings pancakes, French toast and duck egg hashes with a choice of black pudding, smoked haddock, mushroom and spinach or corned beef. For dessert, bananas Foster and a baked Alaska involving pistachios and cherries are prepared tableside. Jimmy’s (aka the American Bar) makes for an appealing, low-lit stopping-off point with a fondness for bourbon and American whiskey.

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High Road Brasserie

High Road Brasserie

£30 - £49
Modern European

162 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 1PR

A row of west London townhouses makes a good home for this animated brasserie where everything from breakfast through to late dinner is provided, not to mention a Champagne cocktail or two. There’s an art-deco spin to the interior with its banquette seating and spectacularly colourful floor tiles, which all makes an energetic space for an English breakfast or a croque monsieur, before the all-day menu kicks in with sandwiches, salads and hot food such as pumpkin risotto or pork belly with crackling and apple slaw. Steak frites is a speciality, and there are “great” Saturday brunches and “superb” Sunday lunches, rounded off by the comfort of a plum crumble, perhaps. Drink draught Chiswick Bitter or European lager, or perhaps something from the short, well-rounded wine list. With “fab service”, terrace tables and a laid-back vibe, HRB is the complete neighbourhood package.

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The Drapers Arms

The Drapers Arms

£30 - £49
Gastropub

44 Barnsbury Street, London, N1 1ER

It may look gentrified, but The Drapers Arms is a lively place, with the ground-floor bar humming like a good ’un when the locals flock in. The Georgian building’s fine features have been left well alone, which makes for spaces of generous proportions and classic design. To drink, there are real ales at the bar and a wine list offering glass and carafe options. Head upstairs to the serene dining room to escape the hubbub (assuming it’s not booked for a private party). A patio garden provides another alternative in summer. The kitchen satisfies with its mix of modern comfort food, such as the house cheeseburger, but is equally happy knocking up duck breast with roasted black plums, or packing guinea fowl, bacon and mushrooms into a pie. To finish, gingerbread pudding competes with Neal’s Yard Dairy cheeses with crab apple jelly (is it OK to have both?).

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The Guinea Grill

The Guinea Grill

£50 - £79
British
£50 - £79

30 Bruton Place, London, W1J 6NL

A microcosm of vintage Mayfair ringing with claret-fuelled guffaws, The Guinea Grill nestles behind a Young’s pub frontage in the clubbiest of rooms, all clustered white-clothed tables, tartan carpets, wine cabinets and prints of ruddy-faced soldiers in a wood-panelled wrapper. A green-coated doorman and waiters in black waistcoats play their ever-smiling parts, while a lone chef tends the furiously hot grill behind displays of prime, dry-aged fillets, rib-eyes and rumps from the Scotch Beef Club – it’s all very “old school”. The kitchen also sends out acclaimed suet-crusted pies by the score, as well as more delicate dishes such as crayfish and crab cocktail, smoked Gressingham duck or grilled Dover sole, while big helpings of suitably calorific cheesecake or fruit crumble may necessitate some belt loosening. “Just the tonic on a rainy Mayfair night”, concluded one fan.

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