Best restaurants in Fitzrovia

Looking for a restaurant in Fitzrovia? We’ve done the hard work so you don’t have to, and compiled a handy list of the best. Whatever your budget or taste, SquareMeal is here to help, with a selection of the best restaurants for every occas

Updated on 31 July 2018

Best restaurants in Fitzrovia


Beast

Beast

Over £80
Steak
International
Fish

3 Chapel Place, W1G 0BG

A basement revellers’ hall with gleaming candelabra and endless wooden tables channelling medieval feasting (especially during bonus season for City boys), Beast is Goodman’s tribute to high-rolling surf ’n’ turf. It was all change in 2016, though, with the fixed-price option of nibbles, king crab and steak jettisoned in favour of a steakhouse-style, all-day menu that’s priced no less ruinously. Still, you get what you pay for; witness the free glass of vintage fizz on arrival, the blue-tinged tanks of gargantuan, prehistoric-looking king crabs and an aging room of long-shrivelled Nebraskan beef. It’s all top-end stuff, but unimpressed visitors (ourselves included) feel the place is “nothing special” and “overpriced for what it is”, with ancillary items such as Wagyu tataki, shrimp tempura, and crab and foie gras gyozas eliciting little praise. Wines (from £40 a bottle) are no less punishing, while service strikes us as directionless.

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Pied à Terre

Pied à Terre

£50 - £79
French
One michelin star

34 Charlotte Street, W1T 2NH

From its prized modern art and groaning cheeseboard to legions of suited staff, Pied à Terre remains “timeless in its class” – “always original, always fun, always great”. Head chef Asimakis Chaniotis has made the kitchen his own and can deliver some truly dazzling dishes, judging by our recent experience: roasted veal sweetbread and plump cockles drenched in seaweed butter; delicate squid ‘linguine’ under buckwheat and sea herbs; and a modernist spin on coconut rice pudding have all impressed mightily. The classics aren’t forgotten either – roasted and braised lamb is served alongside London’s most sophisticated take on ratatouille, while original chef Richard Neat’s foie gras and borlotti beans in Sauternes consommé is still fresh after 25 years. Apart from the bargain set lunch, prices are reassuringly top-end, but there’s ample value in a book-sized wine list, with “incredibly helpful” sommeliers. While the detail-rich dining room is pokey for some (and cosy for others), a recently refurbished upstairs bar is perhaps Fitzrovia’s best kept drinking secret. “Just simply fabulous”, sums it up.

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Lima

Lima

£50 - £79
Peruvian

31 Rathbone Place, London, W1T 1JH

Forget the hot barometer of Peruvian food, Lima is one of the few restaurants in London making the unfamiliar utterly delicious. Start with an easy-drinking Pisco Sour plus some puffy pumpkin seed bread, but defer further choice to staff who know the baffling menu inside out. From crisp octopus tentacles on polenta-like maize and olive purée (a riot of purple) to blood-red potatoes set against sour, yellow dressing and artichokes, every dish is a picture in vibrant Technicolor. Elsewhere, sweet potato melded into corn purée is a veggie spin on ceviche, while the real thing is spiky, silky perfection involving dense-fleshed chunks of sea bass. Pressed suckling pig is a standout main (especially with a side of creamy sun-dried potato), while avocado cream and chocolate mousse is a knockout dessert. With its neat, grey-on-grey room recently revamped and extended, Lima is now a true destination – a “fun place with a fun atmosphere”.

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Kitchen Table at Bubbledogs

Kitchen Table at Bubbledogs

Over £80
Modern European
One michelin star

70 Charlotte Street, London, W1T 4QG

“Mind-blowing food, exceptional wines and perfect service” – that’s what punters can expect if they venture into this semi-secret dining space behind a leather curtain at the back of funky Bubbledogs. True to its name, Kitchen Table’s U-shaped counter fits snugly around the kitchen, where up to 20 diners can perch on stools, elbow-to-elbow with their neighbours, watching and listening to chef James Knappett’s team as they prepare (and often serve) the day’s Michelin-starred menu. Nibbles of chicken skin, bacon jam and rosemary mascarpone generally open the show, while each of the subsequent 12 courses is described by a single word on the blackboard (‘oyster’, ‘shrimp’, ‘potato’). That said, the results are bold, ultra-modern and revelatory: a dish simply entitled ‘scallop’ might see a fleshy raw bivalve in harmonious company with lightly pickled cucumber, elderflowers and a frothy elderflower kombucha (a fermented beverage). James’ partner/sommelier Sandia Chang takes care of Kitchen Table’s 100-bin wine list, which plunders the exclusive ‘grower’ Champagnes on offer at Bubbledogs next door. “A little pricey, but you really pay for what you get – namely quality”, concludes one reader.  

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Picture

Picture

£30 - £49
Modern European

110 Great Portland Street, London, W1W 6PQ

Equally suited to a quick business meet or a special night out, this “fantastic oasis behind Oxford Street” is clearly doing something right – perhaps because its three owners all met at Arbutus, where they learned the knack of serving classy food at unexpectedly keen prices. Picture’s six-course tasting menu is one of London’s bargains, but without a whiff of cost-cutting – witness Cheltenham beetroot tartare with pomegranate, feta and pine nuts, lightly smoked pork with Jerusalem artichoke, quince and pickled shallot, or cod fillet with sprouting broccoli, celeriac and trompette mushrooms. Elsewhere, crispy beef ‘bites’ and a dessert of chocolate mousse, salted caramel and milk jam are fixtures on the carte. The no-frills room is all bare boards and stripped, industrial-chic walls, but padded seats and glossy wood tables don’t compromise on comfort – no wonder it’s also a “great-value” lunchtime magnet for Fitzrovia’s too-cool media crowd. Service is “friendly and knowledgeable”, while savvy wines deliver on price and quality.

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Bao Fitzrovia

Bao Fitzrovia

Under £30
Taiwanese

31 Windmill Street, London, W1T 2JN

Hot on the heels of Bao Soho, this second restaurant sticks to the blueprint: contemporary Taiwanese small plates served in an intimate dining space. In contrast to Soho, Fitzrovia’s open kitchen, as well as a bar nestled in the middle of a giant sharing table, results in a more dynamic and inclusive dining experience. After ticking off our choices on the paper menu, we ate our way through a steady stream of served-when-ready dishes. Xiao-chi (appetisers) include crispy prawn heads dipped in mayonnaise and fried chicken chop, served alongside egg yolk and hot sauce. The famed soft-steamed buns don’t disappoint and the confit pork belly option, paired with crispy shallots and soy-pickled chilli, gets the flavour and spice balance just right. A concise list of cocktails named after Taiwanese films offers the perfect accompaniment to this affordable comfort food. If you have room for dessert (these are deceptively filling small plates), a refreshing chocolate and toasted rice milkshake ably offsets the flavour-packed mains. Servers on our visit were knowledgeable and attentive, but with bookings only taken for groups of at least four, you’ll probably be queuing to get in – Bao’s greatest drawback is its own popularity. 

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Hakkasan Hanway Place

Hakkasan Hanway Place

£50 - £79
Chinese
One michelin star
£50 - £79

8 Hanway Place, London, W1T 1HD

“Wow, wow and wow!” exclaims a fan of Hakkasan, who reckons it’s definitely the “sexiest restaurant” he’s ever frequented. Certainly, there’s a “sultry charm” to this “sensual”, barely lit basement, with clubby VIP vibes, easy-on-the-eye staff and black-lacquered interiors making it “perfect for a hot date”. Kick off with Asian-inspired cocktails at the bar, then try definitive versions of takeaway classics and “impressive” ‘small eats’ such as jasmine tea-smoked ribs or “amazingly light” Shanghai dumplings boosted by chilli and vinegar. To follow, readers rave about the gigantic spicy prawns with asparagus, almonds, lily bulbs, spring onion and water chestnuts (“a riot of colourful tastes and textures”), but we’re hooked on the salt and pepper squid, the duck braised with truffle and the “riveting” crispy lamb salad with peanut dressing. No one escapes the top-end pricing, but readers agree that “you pay for what you get”. Multiple tasting menus can keep the bills in check, although the ambitious wine list might push them back up again. Either way, it’s “absolutely outstanding”.

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Bubbledogs

Bubbledogs

Under £30
International

70 Charlotte Street, W1T 4QG

Launched at the height of ‘gourmet fast food’ mania, Bubbledogs’ still-snaking queues prove that grower Champagne and high-class hotdogs are a combination built to last. This quirky match-up works, thanks to “awesome service” and a “cool ambience” in the smart, brick-on-wood room. Co-owner Sandia Chang’s passion for small-producer fizz rubs off on staff who know her treat-packed list inside out, while James Knappett’s kitchen applies similar respect to pork, beef or veggie dogs, with some 17 versions, including Sloppy Joe (beef chilli, Cheddar cheese and onions) and José (fresh tomato, avocado, jalapeños and sour cream). Our pick, however, is the purist’s dream – a New Yorker’s onions and sauerkraut drenched in table-top French’s and ketchup, backed up by ruthlessly addictive sides of ‘tater tots’ and sweet-potato fries. Those less enamoured of fizz will find on-point cocktails, craft beers and even a few still wines from the Champagne region.

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Mere

Mere

£50 - £79
Modern European

74 Charlotte Street, London, W1T 4QH

Monica Galetti, MasterChef judge and former senior sous-chef at Le Gavroche, offered herself up for public scrutiny when she opened Mere, but reports of “understated excellence” suggest she is on a winning streak. An elegant, sumptuously upholstered bar allows guests to peruse the menu, and the striking design continues downstairs, where a double-height glass frontage makes Mere equally appealing for lunch or dinner. Galetti’s Samoan and Kiwi heritage blend seamlessly with Gavroche-style haute cuisine for a contemporary take on high-end dining that’s harmonious, pretty and shot through with “simply amazing” flavours and textures. A springy curl of octopus comes hot and sticky from the plancha with an addictive caper and raisin jam on the side, lobster is simply poached and served with potato purée, cabbage and a bisque sauce, while 30-day aged sirloin is accompanied by puffs of onion beignets, glazed cheek and a tarragon crème fraîche. After that, the coconut cream pie filled with roasted banana and drizzled with rum caramel is the stuff of sweet dreams. The wine list is also “a joy” – in short, Ms Galetti has stamped her identity on one of London’s most famous foodie streets.

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Kazu

Kazu

£30 - £49
Japanese

64 Charlotte Street, London, W1T 4QD

Located at the far end of Charlotte Street, Kazu blends traditional minimalist looks (bare wood, a sushi counter, an open kitchen and severely black-clad staff) with a friendly welcome and some contemporary flourishes on a menu that rarely puts a foot wrong. Sharing plates might bring stir-fried pork belly with kimchi, beef tataki and renkon chips (actually deep-fried lotus root), while agedashi tofu sees lightly fried, barely set beancurd in a delicate broth. Elsewhere, our hamachi (yellowtail) with jalapeño was prettily arranged (we were grateful for the sparing use of the fiery pepper), although nothing could trump the flavour-packed, miso-marinated ‘fisherman’s roll’ wrapped in a fold of seared salmon and packing a wasabi punch. We’re also pleased to report that the menu now offers bigger portions and friendlier prices, with all-in set lunches offering particularly good value for the likes of chicken teriyaki, grilled sea eel and prawn tempura – all served with miso soup, rice, salad and dessert. In short, Kazu’s low-key approach will appeal to diners turned off by the wallet-emptying flash of some other modern Japanese hotspots.

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Berners Tavern at The London Edition

Berners Tavern at The London Edition

£50 - £79
Modern European

10 Berners Street, London, W1T 3NP

“I love this place!” chimes one reader – and rightly so. Jason Atherton’s 21st-century reinvention of hotel dining has made Berners Tavern one of the hottest tickets in town. Sporting “the most beautiful dining room in London” (think towering ceilings, mosaics, gilt-framed oil paintings and a soaring, yellow-lit bar), this place oozes glamour, pizzazz and grandeur, without feeling remotely “stuffy”. There are many foodie triumphs here, although the reimagining of the hotel dining-room trolley is one to really savour – watch as a giant, perfectly cooked pork pie is sliced tableside and artfully arranged with pickled carrots, fennel, piccalilli and mustards. Other classic British options include the “best prawn cocktail ever” (loaded with sweet lobster jelly, avocado and crispy shallots), but the menu’s versatility ranges from gloriously indulgent five-cheese macaroni topped with slow-cooked beef blade (“to die for”) to roast Cornish cod with crispy squid, basil fregola and soothing tomato consommé. For a final touch of theatre, go for the buttermilk Alaska, finished with flaming liquor, soft hunks of rhubarb and pistachio. Service at Berners Tavern is “second to none” – as we’ve come to expect from Mr Atherton. 

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Portland

Portland

£30 - £49
International
One michelin star

113 Great Portland Street, London, W1W 6QQ

Will Lander’s Portland is a rare thing – a thoroughly grown-up, relaxed and “cosy” restaurant that deals in neighbourhood fine-dining without a hint of stuffiness. The cool, “understated” dining room is as dashing as a Savile Row suit, with its dark-wood flooring, Scandi furniture and watercolour portraits – all leading towards the Michelin-starred open kitchen. The menu wows without overcomplicating things, and every dish “hits the heights” – from a show-stopping snack of crispy chicken skin loaded with rich chicken liver parfait to a little bowl of silky crayfish flan with a foamed, buttery bisque.

Elsewhere, simplicity also reigns – witness thick, creamy mozzarella topped with the last of the summer’s tomatoes, tarragon leaves and earthy kombu seaweed or a dish of translucent cod with squid ink, hazelnuts, kale and a plump oyster. For dessert, strawberries atop a yoghurt cake with cashew-nut butter really highlights Portland’s use of stellar ingredients. “Textbook” wines are listed on the back of the menu, “friendly” staff are “attentive but don’t hover” and portions are big enough to “satisfy a rugby player” – in fact, it’s hard to have anything less than a “great experience” here. 

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Noizé

Noizé

£30 - £49
French

39 Whitfield Street, London, W1T 2SF

It’s a brave restaurateur who would take over a site as garlanded as what used to be Dabbous but having been co-owner, manager and sommelier of Pied à Terre, Mathieu Germond has built up a loyal following in Fitzrovia and beyond. The place is unrecognisable from its former life, not only in looks – the raw industrialism of Dabbous has been smoothed over with a lick of turquoise paint and an upholstering of red and grey velvet – but on the menu, with former Pied à Terre chef Ed Dutton cooking classic French bistro food, but executed with a finesse several notches of sophistication higher. Warm cheese gougères are thickly stuffed with strong Cheddar, glazed sweetbreads come with a liberal scattering of bosky morels, beautifully cooked scallops sit under thinly sliced cauliflower and, best of all, there’s  a superb plateful of meltingly soft suckling pig belly with crisp crackling and silky, tarragon-infused pomme purée. Steep prices are generally worth it, although a terrine of foie gras, leek and pork simply advertised as ‘foie gras’ on the menu seemed disingenuous. Otherwise, this place is a charmer – Germond even nipped round to Pied à Terre to fetch some crackers for our plate of well-chosen cheese. Noizé, incidentally, is the name of a village in the Loire where Germond’s grandparents owned a farm, and the sparkling Vouvray is just one of the excellent Loire Valley wines on a list that can be sampled in the basement bar. 

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Salt Yard

Salt Yard

£50 - £79
Tapas
Spanish

54 Goodge Street, London, W1T 4NA

It’s easy to see why Salt Yard’s genuinely shareable, sensibly paced small plates are loved by Londoners, because its “consistently great food” is leagues ahead of your average tapas. In fact, its top dishes wouldn’t be out of place in a far more formal setting than this bar-like amalgam of bare wood, brown banquettes and brass lampshades. Just consider gooey and crisp smoked eel croquetas on precise dabs of vivid pink beetroot purée, hake fillet and baby artichoke with foaming ajo blanco or rosy slices of Ibérico presa and calcot-style grilled onions with a ruby romesco sauce like pure silk.

Cream stools are comfy, but it’s the sharp cooking, keen pricing and ever-changing menu that keep in-the-know regulars perpetually hooked. “Lovely staff” buy into the concept and advise with confidence; we certainly appreciated their suggestion of a classy chocolate mousse with mini-churros and cherries for dessert. The cracking Mediterranean-leaning wine list is strong on by-the-glass options.

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Mac & Wild Fitzrovia

Mac & Wild Fitzrovia

£30 - £49
Scottish
British

65 Great Titchfield Street, London, W1W 7PS

Great food starts with great produce – a mantra that’s taken Andy Waugh from game-butcher’s son via award-winning pop-ups to Mac & Wild. His acclaimed ‘veni-moo’ burger is still a mainstay, and its combination of beef and wild venison patties, cheese, béarnaise and caramelised onions is an understandable hit with loyal regulars. Meanwhile, purists arrive early to bag chateaubriands from an ever-depleting blackboard. The stripped-back, brick-on-wood interiors here are strewn with deer hides and butcher’s hooks. In fact, Scottish tones are pervasive, with craft beers hailing from north of the border, chunky tables hewn from trees felled on the family estate and plenty of whiskies to choose from. Staff may lack the accent, but they certainly know their meat.

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Clipstone

Clipstone

£30 - £49
Modern European

5 Clipstone Street, W1W 6BB

Following the success of Michelin-starred Portland, this sibling – a less ambitious (but no less enjoyable) venture – has quickly become a top-notch Fitzrovia favourite. Whitewashed walls, gleaming tiles, wood furnishings and wraparound windows set the scene, the atmosphere is welcoming and the menu spins through sharing plates and bistro-style dishes with lower prices to match.

Plump mussels poached in saké come with bouncy sourdough, and the same dough is used for pizzas (perhaps topped with clams, crème fraiche and garlic), although we favour the premium Yorkshire hogget, served pink atop coco beans and girolles, followed by Paris-Brest – a deliriously sweet, ridiculously enjoyable concoction of hazelnut praline and choux pastry. Wines also punch way above their weight, with superb on-tap options including Château Pesquié Terrasses Rouge. In short, the kind of relaxed, accomplished, good-value restaurant we’d all love on our doorstep.

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Greyhound Café

Greyhound Café

£30 - £49

37 Berners Street, London, W1T 3NB

Greyhound Café is a side project from Thai designer Bhanu Inkawat that stretches to 17 cafés across Asia. Its London debut may look dark and minimalist but, once seated, you’ll find a riot of fun. An overwhelming menu (we counted at least 10 pages) features artily-shot food imagery, and we’d recommend ordering four to five small plates between two and then a large plate each. Zanily-named dishes include Complicated Noodles, which arrives as a DIY plate of rice noodle sheets and iceberg lettuce to be topped with spicy minced pork, a chilli-spiked lime sauce and chopped coriander. Much of the food is messy and designed to be eaten with your hands; a mound of crunchy, juicy pork knuckle arrives alongside fiery dipping sauces and a box of sticky rice, while crispy chicken wings are zingily marinated in fish sauce. The fun continues through to the signature Happy Toast for pudding: golden brioche toast next to the word ‘happy’ spelled out in flour, and a range of sauces to top it with – you’ll see it a lot on your Instagram feed this year. Luminous soft drinks, a buzzy atmosphere and staff wearing t-shirts that read ‘I don’t speak Thai, but I recommend good dishes’ are further pluses. Prices are on the steep side, but sizeable portions mean you won’t leave hungry. 

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The Ninth

The Ninth

£30 - £49
Modern European
One michelin star

22 Charlotte Street, London, W1T 2NB

The sum of 26 years working in big-name kitchens, this is the ninth restaurant that chef/owner Jun Tunaka has worked in – with a shiny new Michelin star to boot. Despite a sharing concept that screams ‘on-trend’, tables are regularly full to overflowing and there’s a lot to like in dishes that are “inspired, simple and of the highest quality”. A square of punchy rabbit lasagne is the ultimate in refined comfort eating, dinky spherical oxtail croquettes are impossibly moreish, and roast quail is balanced by sharp pickled cherries, with bursts of foie gras, bacon and pistachio. Check out the ‘raw and cured’ or ‘vegetable’ sections for lighter picks, and don’t pass up the caramelised lemon tart (gleaned from Jun’s time under Marco Pierre White). The two bare-brick rooms, all gleaming tables and shiny floors, are chic and contemporary. Service is “skilled and friendly”, the wine list covers all bases, and at lunchtime you’ll bag three plates for £23.

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La Tagliata Grafton Way

La Tagliata Grafton Way

Under £30
Steak
Italian

45 Grafton Street, London, W1T 5DQ

This second branch of Liverpool Street’s La Tagliata  occupies the old Sardo premises near Warren Street tube and does the site’s Italian heritage proud. One half is occupied by an L-shaped  wine bar for aperitivi, pizzas and Bulgari estate wines; the other is a restaurant proper decked out in wood panelling and white leather, as well suited to a low-key business lunch as a midweek supper with friends. Pasta and the namesake tagliata steak are the top draws, although our very rich carbonara had been made with such a generous quantity of butter we were grateful we’d ordered it as a starter rather than a main course. The steak is excellent, charred and smoky around the edges, tender and full-flavoured within, and needing no accompaniment beyond a sprinkling of salt and a slick of the olive oil served in a small bowl – although it would take an iron will not to order a portion of garlic and rosemary potatoes, which are the roasties of your dreams.  Slow service is the only downer at the sort of neighbourly local everyone would be glad to have on their doorstep. 

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Kyseri

Kyseri

£30 - £49
Middle Eastern

64 Grafton Way, London, W1T 5DN

Modern Turkish Oklava won legions of fans when it opened in Shoreditch back in 2015 and now restaurateurs Laura Christie and Selin Kiazim hope to repeat their success with this stylish and intimate follow up, right by Warren Street tube. The menu is inspired by dishes from the city of Kayseri; the ‘a’ has supposedly been dropped in order to show that Kyseri offers up Turkish dishes with a twist, although we suspect it’s also because it makes the restaurant easier to Google.

Innovative small plates to share include the likes of a canapé-sized lamb and loquat skewer: dainty, yet punchy, the sweet and juicy loquat providing a perfect contrast to the intense, spice-laden lamb. We were also impressed by veal sweetbreads, which saw meltingly soft meat massaged with creamy hazelnut yoghurt and brown butter. The Turkish pasta is another highlight: manti (dumpling-style pasta parcels) are stuffed with sour cherry-flecked beef and served with a blend of yoghurt and a peppery red sauce, which you’ll have to resist licking clean off the plate.

An intriguing wine list champions small producers from Turkey and the Middle East, while desserts also excite: we were particularly taken by the sweet-as-can-be honey ice cream, sandwiched between two crumbly crackers. Cool, calm and seriously delicious, Kyseri is a little slice of Turkish heaven.

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Honey & Co

Honey & Co

£30 - £49
Middle Eastern
Cafes

25a Warren Street, London, W1T 5LZ

Freshness and subtle spicing are the hallmarks of Honey & Co’s relentlessly popular re-invigoration of Middle Eastern dining. Punters pack the diminutive room surrounded by shelves deep-laden with preserves, produce and cookbooks, while the kitchen delivers “adventure and flair” right through the day. Like the space itself, staff are warm and inclusive, showing a passion for a menu that blends comfort and care. Mezze is the smart sociable choice, with tables heaving under bowls of pillowy hummus, carrot falafels, braised aubergines, feta borek, house pickles, labneh, olives and home-baked breads – all before the mains arrive. Our roast lamb on a zingy grape and bulgur salad was highly enjoyable, though minced lamb with a tahini and yoghurt crust proved an indulgence too far. The iced teas are a booze-free delight and the cheesecake with Greek thyme honey is irresistible. Meanwhile, breakfast pastries are a “favourite pick-me-up” for one regular.

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Roka Charlotte Street

Roka Charlotte Street

Over £80
Sushi
Japanese

37 Charlotte Street, London, W1T 1RR

A Fitzrovia hit since launching in 2004, Roka’s trailblazing modern Japanese cuisine and “sophisticated atmosphere” are still a universal smash with readers. Some enjoy “chilling out”, others love its “romantic vibe”, but the expertly fashioned food is what really turns heads. Most diners are old hands at navigating a menu packed with modern-day classics (black cod in yuzu miso, wafer-thin truffled yellowtail sashimi, scallop and shiso lollipops, baby spinach in creamy sesame dressing) although clued-up staff still offer ever-changing seasonal tips – perhaps grilled cobia fish with mushrooms and truffle, or indulgent Wagyu tartare sushi rolls topped with caviar. The sleek glass-fronted room is all polished wood and industrial ceilings, with in-demand seats ringing the frantic action around the fierce robata grill (mercifully with an efficient extraction system). Prices merit either an expense account, or a very careful eye, so maybe grab a tasting menu to keep bills in check or skip the ostentatious dessert platters. Wine fits the top-end bill, but eye-opening saké and classy, shochu-based cocktails steal the show.

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