Best London gastropubs

Looking for a gastropub in London? Of course you are: we’re British, after all. Whatever the weather, it’s always pub o’clock, so check out our selection of the best gastropubs in London right here. If you’re in the mood for a craft brew, a traditional Sunday roast or a sun-drenched beer garden, these London gastropubs won’t disappoint.  

Updated on 24 August 2018

Over the last two decades, London has seen an explosion of gastropubs opening up, the perfect combination of a British and good quality restaurant. Gone is the notion of unattractive restaurants serving below average food, the gastropub has brought dining bang up to date with smart and stylish dining areas and high quality menus. Gastropub cuisine is wide and varied and encompasses cuisines from all over the world. Some focus solely on British cuisine, others offer an eclectic mix of dishes, but above all, each gastropub serves food of a high quality.

London boasts a fantastic range of great gastropubs, whether it’s gastropubs in the heart of the City, the HammersmithKensington or any other area of London, you’ll always find a great gastropub in the vicinity. Fashionable, laid back and comfortable, gastropubs are well –loved by everyone. SquareMeal has carefully selected the best gastropubs cuisine in London to help you with your choice.

Every one of the gastropubs cuisines featured in SquareMeal’s list of London’s top gastropub cuisines have been tried and tested by food critics and our own customers so check out the reviews and book a table online with SquareMeal today. Each SquareMeal listing features an independent review, as well as reviews from diners, together with unique special offers such as free drinks and discounts.

The Malt House

The Malt House

17 Vanston Place, London, SW6 1AY

This dressed-up SW6 gastropub with rooms originally dates back to 1729. By 1900 the pub was known as The Jolly Maltster and despite a major overhaul in 2013, many of the building’s standout Victorian features remain -think wood panelling, high ceilings and tasteful décor. Chef Oliver Tobias is behind the Bosi-approved menu, with classics such as steak, Guinness and mushroom pie or charcoal barbecued steaks alongside a list of seasonal specials. Sundays are a good excuse for a meaty feast of Duke of Buccleuch roast steak, pork belly or corn fed chicken breast, while sweet finishes include apricot and almond tart or white chocolate ice cream with biscotti. Berry Brothers & Rudd consult on the international wine list, there’s a range of craft lagers and cocktails and a snug, sheltered garden in which to enjoy them.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Drapers Arms

The Drapers Arms

44 Barnsbury Street, London, N1 1ER

It may look gentrified, but The Drapers Arms is a lively place, with the ground-floor bar humming like a good ’un when the locals flock in. The Georgian building’s fine features have been left well alone, which makes for spaces of generous proportions and classic design. To drink, there are real ales at the bar and a wine list offering glass and carafe options. Head upstairs to the serene dining room to escape the hubbub (assuming it’s not booked for a private party). A patio garden provides another alternative in summer. The kitchen satisfies with its mix of modern comfort food, such as the house cheeseburger, but is equally happy knocking up duck breast with roasted black plums, or packing guinea fowl, bacon and mushrooms into a pie. To finish, gingerbread pudding competes with Neal’s Yard Dairy cheeses with crab apple jelly (is it OK to have both?).

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Orange

The Orange

37-39 Pimlico Road, London, SW1W 8NE

Attracting a younger crowd than its swanker sibling The Thomas Cubitt, this huge Belgravia gastropub earns its keep with plenty of buzz on the boozy ground floor and the wood-fired oven pumping out fresh, crisp pizzas, while the bartenders pull pints of Canopy beer and mix the odd cocktail. Upstairs, others make reservations for dinner and there’s proper table service in a serene space that resembles a country pub dining room. The kitchen does a good trade in pizzas up here too, but it also turns its hand to more cheffy dishes such as grilled sardines with coddled egg and sheep’s cheese, balsamic braised lamb pie with sour-cream mash, or gingerbread with port figs and brown bread parfait. Order ahead if you want your own joint to share for Sunday lunch. “Very moreish” says one fan, who is also quick to praise the “very accommodating, helpful and patient staff”.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
Duke of Sussex

Duke of Sussex

75 South Parade, Chiswick, London, W4 5LF

Character aplenty suffuses this sizeable old pub, constructed on a corner site towards the end of the 19th century and now owned by the Metropolitan Pub Co. Don’t miss the stonking skylight in the dining area, adorned with cherubs and glitzy chandeliers – though the place as a whole isn’t overdressed. Its unreconstructed bar is stocked with real ales and the menu takes inspiration from Spain. There’s a great garden to enjoy in good weather as well. Tuck into classic tapas such as chipirones, tortilla and ham croquetas, or order them as a starter if you’re taking the three-course route. Main courses aren’t entirely Iberian, so you’ll find rib-eye steak with peppercorn sauce, and chicken pie for two, sitting alongside pork, chorizo and bean stew. Finish with chocolate brownie or sherry cream with raspberries. The wine list sticks to Europe, apart from Spanish-speaking Argentina and Chile, though there’s nothing from Sussex. The Duke would not be amused. 

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Eagle - Farringdon Road

The Eagle - Farringdon Road

159 Farringdon Road, London, EC1R 3AL

The kitchen may be a bit of a squeeze (it’s only big enough for two), but since launching in 1991, The Eagle has maintained a reputation for gastropub food of the best sort. It’s was the first of a new breed when it opened its doors, a trailblazer that’s still deserving of your attention. The daily menu is scrawled on blackboards, you order at the bar, the decor is “unreconstructed corner pub” and there’s an impressive range of beers, while the intelligent wine list offers everything by the glass. It’s an all-round winning format. The robust flavours of southern Europe and the Med are prominent, but not exclusive, and everything is spot on from an onglet steak served rare with roast potatoes to grilled mackerel with an Asian spin. After that, desserts such as buttermilk pannacotta with spiced plums round off proceedings in fine style.  

£30 - £49
Gastropub
£50 - £79
Railway Tavern

Railway Tavern

2 St Jude Street, London, N16 8JT

Back in the day, this was Old Henry’s Freehouse, but it has moved on, smartened up its act and now trades as the Railway Tavern (or the Railway Tavern Ale House, if you prefer). Located in the district of Mildmay – the hinterland between Islington and Dalston – the modest corner site mixes some rather sedate Victorian features and grey walls with 1950s panelling, film posters and a few comfy armchairs. Serious beer drinking is the main business here, with up to nine ales on tap including the likes of Brewdog, Adnams, Redemption’s Trinity (produced in Tottenham) and tipples from Purity Brewing Co in Warwickshire, plus Meantime lager, a couple of European representatives and ciders too – not forgetting a host of bottled stuff. Food looks to the Far East for slow-cooked Thai curries, stir-fries and noodles.

Pubs
Thai
Cross Keys Chelsea

Cross Keys Chelsea

1 Lawrence Street, London, London, SW3 5NB

A worthy reimagining of a classic Chelsea pub, The Cross Keys’ latest guise sees it kitted out like the illegitimate offspring of a country boozer and an artfully distressed Manhattan steakhouse. For our money, it kind of works – bar stools, real ales and excellent Scotch eggs keep the local drinkers happy, while low-hanging industrial lights, rustic panelling and brown booths provide a cosy restaurant setting for some polished British grub at the back of the pub. Depending on the season, you could kick off with a bowl of green pea soup with pig’s head croquette, before tackling a meaty slab of cod with brown shrimps, broccoli, toasted almonds and a rich chicken jus. After that, the beautiful peach and mascarpone cheesecake with charred peach and pistachio makes a wonderful finale. Sunday roasts are well worth the trip, with whole roast chickens served ready for carving at the table.

£30 - £49
British
Gastropub
The Long Arm Pub & Brewery

The Long Arm Pub & Brewery

20-26 Worship Street, London, EC2A 2DX

This eco-friendly pub and brewery is the brainchild of Tom and Ed Martin, who oversee the ETM group which also looks after nearby The Jugged Hare and Aviary to name a few. The buzzy space was brimming with City suits on our mid-week visit, keen to try The Long Arm’s take on brewing. The pub follows a ‘tank fresh’ approach thanks to its on-site micro-brewery – this means drinks are served directly from the tank, cutting out the need for bottles and packaging. It may come across as a gimmick, but we did find our IPA beer tasted fresher for it. Other options from punters to choose from include stout and ale, while there’s also a small-batch gin too. Food wise, there’s an impressive, if a little overpriced, menu of modern pub grub, including superfood salads for the health-conscious. From a selection of starting snacks, we chose crispy battered squid rings, and rich, warming mac ‘n’ cheese croquettes. Mains consist of burgers and hotdogs, paired with craft beers. We opted for the shorthorn cheese burger – two tender beef patties slathered in melted cheese and sandwiched between a soft brioche bun – and a side of thin, crispy French fries. There are no desserts at The Long Arm, so swap them out for a selection of beery cocktails, including the tart El Matador (Tequila, lime juice, agave nectar strawberry, basil and a lager top). 

Under £30
Gastropub
The Crabtree

The Crabtree

4 Rainville Road, Fulham, London, W6 9HA

South Hammersmith residents should rejoice: in The Crabtree, they have a pub with one of London’s best Thames-side beer gardens, located in a position that only locals and hardy beer fans bother reaching. Nevertheless, the place buzzes on a sunny afternoon – as the barbecue sends grilled meat aromas over the river, and the Harrods depository looms handsomely on the opposite bank. Real ales are kept meticulously, and an outside bar sells chilled bottles of lager to sun-hungry drinkers. In chilly weather, the smart Victorian interior comes into its own, and the British-led menu is full of warming dishes such as pan-roasted lamb’s liver and herb butter on sourdough with salsa verde, or Barnsley chop with Chantenay carrots and mint jus. Prices are pretty high, but service is prompt and cheery.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Hour Glass

The Hour Glass

279-283 Brompton Road, London, SW3 2DY

Following on from its 2015 relaunch, this once-tired boozer has been given a new lease of life courtesy of the brains behind the nearby Brompton Food Market. The diminutive dark-wood bar is the perfect spot for a pint of Sierra Nevada and a Scotch egg, but we’d recommend heading upstairs to see what The Hour Glass is really capable of. With its sash windows and a feature wall of old doors, the restaurant offers an elegant – but straightforward – menu of British-themed dishes that yields satisfying results: our whipped cod’s roe on sourdough was a creamy, native take on a taramasalata, topped with crunchy raw fennel, while a crackly slab of pork belly came with butter beans in a rich, show-stealing jus. A silky rhubarb posset with ginger biscuit finished things with aplomb. A well-rounded wine list and snappy, smiley service also hit the mark – in short, a great addition to Brompton Road.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
Norfolk Arms

Norfolk Arms

28 Leigh Street, London, WC1H 9EP

If it weren't for the legs of Ibérico ham hanging in the window and the meat slicer on the counter, you might think the Norfolk Arms was just another jam-packed Bloomsbury boozer, with its tiled facade, ornate plastered ceilings and prim window boxes. Spanish influences hold sway in the kitchen, with a lengthy tapas menu delivering Padrón peppers, chorizo in cider and Serrano ham croquetas alongside international big-hitters including taramasalata, Scotch eggs with mustard and spare ribs with crackling. The more conventional daily menu also casts its net wide, moving from tiger prawns with guacamole via braised beef cheeks or free-range chicken breast stuffed with black pudding to salted caramel ice cream with toasted sesame seeds. Familiar draught beers are outshone by a sharp globetrotting wine list with plenty by the glass or carafe.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Pig

The Pig's Ear

35 Old Church Street, London, London, SW3 5BS

Here’s a real rarity – a genuinely charming, almost rustic local boozer in the midst of Chelsea’s backstreets, complete with twinkling fairy lights, jumbled auction-room furniture, movie posters and music memorabilia. Pints of signature Pig's Ear Ale (brewed locally by the London Beer Factory), Orchard Pig cider and Belgian lagers go down well with a gooey Scotch egg at the bar, or you can nip upstairs to the oak-panelled dining room for “British comfort cooking executed with style and panache”. Porky pickings are arrayed on charcuterie boards, but also expect market-led dishes ranging from devilled chicken livers on toast to beer-battered codling fillet, braised beef shin with horseradish mash or grilled veal chop with black bean salsa. Roasts rule the roost on Sundays, and the Francophile wine list also does its job. “A gem”, says one fan – and we agree.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Alma Wandsworth

The Alma Wandsworth

499 Old York Road, London, SW18 1JF

This green-tiled beauty of a pub provides a proper welcome to locals who drop in for a drink, and might later decide to have a snack. There’s also a dedicated dining room and some rather beautiful bedrooms, while the bar is stocked with Young’s draft beers and all the usual pub fare (they’ll even do you a Bloody Mary if needs must). For something a bit different, quaff a pint of the regularly changing cask beer guest and snack on the likes of sandwiches, confit duck wings with chilli sauce, soup of the day or you could pick a sharing board. Customers heading for the dining room might be treated to wild boar meatballs with roasted carrots and mash, roasted gnocchi with butternut squash, or there’s always the range of burgers to choose from. Sunday lunch means a separate menu of various roasts, while The Alma is also a welcome spot for sports fans looking for somewhere to watch the game. 

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Victoria - Sheen

The Victoria - Sheen

10 West Temple Sheen, Richmond, London, SW14 7RT

With a popular primary school behind and some of Richmond’s largest houses around the corner, The Victoria has its market on its doorstep. From breakfast to supper time, the place hums with activity, though is seldom overstretched. Celeb chef Paul Merrett’s menu ticks all the right boxes – properly poached eggs and decent coffee to start the day, moving on to appealing bar nibbles and snacks (almonds, king prawns a la plancha, chorizo) or a full-on menu. Merrett’s cooking has always been a draw, and with the likes of pan-fried sea trout on mussel and celeriac chowder, high-quality steaks with proper béarnaise sauce, and a Sunday slow-roast pork with apple sauce, he’s keeping everyone happy. The large enclosed playground allows children to let off steam at the weekend while their frazzled parents pore gratefully over the wine list or sample one of the cask ales from a choice line-up.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
Canton Arms

Canton Arms

177 South Lambeth Road, London, SW8 1XP

Located on scruffy South Lambeth Road, this “fantastic” neighbourhood boozer got a minimal makeover in 2010 when it was taken over by Aussie chef and writer Trish Hilferty (ex-The Eagle and The Anchor & Hope). Expect a daily menu full of pared-down British and European flavours, from smoked cod’s roe with Jersey royals, horseradish and dill or home-cured bresaola with mustard fruits to grilled Cornish lemon sole with salsify and brown shrimps or braised Creedy Carver chicken with cannellini beans and wild garlic aïoli. Meanwhile, the Canton’s food-friendly wine list is packed with “amazing finds and organic jewels” – plus lots of big flavours. No bookings, but friendly staff operate a waiting list for those who are happy to hang around in the bar until a table becomes free. It may not be in the most fashionable part of town, but the Canton Arms is “always buzzing”.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Garrison

The Garrison

99-101 Bermondsey Street, Bermondsey, London, SE1 3XB

Bermondsey favourite The Garrison is a stylish, relaxed venue that regularly plays to full houses. Mismatched chairs, slightly wobbly reclaimed tables and an eclectic array of lampshades make for a quirky space that serves eaters and drinkers equally well – there's even a highly recommended pocket-sized cinema in the basement. Sunday roasts can be rather hit and miss (we like our roasties crispy), but the evening menu shows more precise cooking – think crab on toast with watercress and samphire or glazed chicken breast with sweetcorn purée, crushed new potatoes, bacon and rosemary. To finish, the flourless chocolate cake is the stuff of pudding lovers' dreams. With decent prices, terrific breakfasts, all-day snacks, unusual beers and a decent wine list, it's easy to see why The Garrison is always packed.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Thomas Cubitt

The Thomas Cubitt

44 Elizabeth Street, London, London, SW1W 9PA

The smartest of a trio of Belgravia gastropubs that also includes The Orange and The Alfred Tennyson, this perfectly proportioned Regency townhouse is appropriately named after one of London’s most renowned master builders. The ground-floor boozer (and a fair amount of the pavement outside) play host to drinkers and socialisers who can pick from an easy-going menu of pub staples ranging from chilli/salt squid to lamb burgers and fish and chips. Those wanting a smarter, more intimate repast head upstairs to the pretty Regency dining room, where the wine list takes precedence over the beer taps, and the cooking cranks up a notch – think seared scallops on radish tagliatelle or Middle White pork chop with black pudding, caramelised onions and some sweetly acidic gooseberries. Helpings are generous, but it’s worth bracing yourself for puds such as lemon and raspberry baked Alaska. “A really good local restaurant – not the cheapest, but a great vibe”, concludes one fan.
£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Fox & Grapes

The Fox & Grapes

9 Camp Road, London, SW19 4UN

Located on the edge of Wimbledon Common, The Fox and Grapes is now run by TV chef Paul Merrett, after its gastropub credentials were established by Michelin-starred Claude Bosi. A 2018 refurb added splashes of colour, but the characterful original features of the building, which dates back to 1787, stay the same. The buzzy atmosphere is also still intact, complete with canine companions, who are welcome to join their owners here. Merrett, a regular on Saturday Kitchen and Sunday Feast, sticks to a crowd-pleasing formula that mixes British pub classics such as burgers or beer-battered fish & chips, with more ambitious dishes and some international flavours.

We kicked off with moist Thai crab cakes and crisp chicken Caesar croquettes served with baby gem, parmesan and soft boiled egg for a twist on chicken Caesar salad. Mains include cod fillet with anchovy butter and beef sirloin, but our stand-out dish was juicy pork ribeye steak (not a common cut), perfectly cooked and served with braised cabbage and a piquant cider and mustard sauce. Native sourcing, including foraged herbs and seasonal veg from local allotments, is a real plus. Behind the bar, expect a choice of craft beers and real ales, alongside a dependable wine list from Berry Bros & Rudd. Three rooms are also available for overnight stays.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Princess of Shoreditch

The Princess of Shoreditch

76-78 Paul Street, London, EC2A 4NE

A stone’s throw from Old Street station, this 18th-century boozer is a Mecca for hipsters and city slickers alike, who appreciate its no-nonsense pubby vibe, potable tipples and simple but effective food. Drinkers congregate at the ground-floor bar, where three regularly rotated real ales go down well with sophisticated snacks of celeriac soup with truffle oil or scallop ceviche with burnt sweetcorn salsa. However, it’s worth booking ahead for something more special in the subdued upstairs dining room, which puts seasonal produce centre stage – think burrata with pickled radishes, crispy quinoa and mint salad or Swaledale lamb chops with pumpkin pistou, sprouting broccoli and buttermilk dressing. To finish, desserts might feature sticky toffee pudding with vanilla ice cream and a drizzle of bourbon toffee sauce. Also, don’t miss the choice of Sunday roasts. No wonder this regal gem still has plenty of devoted followers. 

£30 - £49
Gastropub
Anchor & Hope

Anchor & Hope

36 The Cut, London, SE1 8LP

The ‘no reservations’ policy, dishevelled interiors and jam-packed tables aren’t enough to deter south London’s dining cognoscenti from patronising its best-known gastropub – although recent reports suggest the Anchor & Hope is getting ‘tired’ and ‘trading on its longevity’. Once you’ve negotiated the scrum at the bar and secured a coveted spot in t he no-frills dining room, you’ll be rewarded with a short (and rapidly depleted) blackboard menu of unreformed grub with a trencherman British accent – perhaps a ‘flavoursome’ warm salad of snails and bacon, Middle White pork faggot and mash, grilled lemon sole with samphire, or fried ox cheek. The enticing wine list has plenty below the £25 mark, although not everyone is happy drinking out of cheap tumblers. You can book for Sunday lunch, with a single sitting at 2pm sharp (very civilised).

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Tommy Tucker

The Tommy Tucker

22 Waterford Road, London, SW6 2DR

The trio behind Claude's Kitchen in Parsons Green wanted to open a pub that they'd be happy to call their local. The result is The Tommy Tucker – more restaurant than boozer (despite the choice of cask ales), with a metallic bar, open kitchen and scrubbed pine tables. Expect robust, fairly priced and confidently executed food featuring elegantly arranged seasonal ingredients. Top picks from our visit included three dense crunchy crab cakes mollified by the accompanying roasted garlic mayo, a slab of perfectly roasted hake and tender, flavoursome beef short-rib – butchered in-house, braised for eight hours then smoked. OK, a side of sweet-potato mash veered into baby-food territory, but we couldn't fault a beautifully boozy, rum-infused 'choc-ice' with moreish salted caramel cream. We'll be back.

£30 - £49
British
The Hero of Maida

The Hero of Maida

55 Shirland Road, London, W9 2JD

Henry Harris’s makeover of this much-loved Maida Vale local (formerly The Truscott Arms) is a boon to the area. Here is a chef who really knows his oignons, and the elegant upstairs room certainly has a smart restaurant-style vibe, although the revamp has kept the heart of the business as a proper pub, complete with a beer garden. A splendid square zinc-topped bar dominates the rich blue boozing space downstairs, with an array of boards and jars nestling among the beer pumps for those who fancy a snack with their pint – although the full menu is available to allcomers, upstairs and down.

Harris’s cooking has always leant towards ‘Franglais’, and he’s a master of the style – witness grilled onglet (charred on the outside but served classically rare) with bone-marrow butter adding a sophisticated gloss. Elsewhere, sweet black bacon is layered atop generous slivers of perfectly pink calf’s liver on a pillow of proper mash, while a lovely chunk of pearlescent cod is simply paired with brown butter and capers. Puds such as lemon posset, poached peach and chocolate pots tend to stay this side of the Channel, and they’re spot-on for those who still have room. 

As befits a really good hostelry, the mainly French wine list has plenty of choice by the glass, but there are some serious bottles for those looking to push the boat out.  Lots of customers, however, stick to pub drinks – there’s an impressive line-up of lagers and ales on draught, as well as some decent cider.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Jugged Hare

The Jugged Hare

49 Chiswell Street, London, EC1Y 4SA

“Fantastic place, really different, but not for the faint-hearted (unless you’re a complete carnivore)”, says a fan of The Jugged Hare – a well-polished gastropub from the ETM group, who also run the nearby Chiswell Street Dining Rooms. With its stag’s heads on the bare brick walls and strung-up rabbits by the toilets, it’s an unabashed celebration of huntin’, fishin’ and shootin’, with “top-quality game” as a standout feature of the seasonal menu: grouse, wild duck and venison shank (with crushed turnip cake and Cumberland sauce) all have their moment, but don’t miss the titular jugged hare – an extremely rich concoction served with heaps of creamy mash, cabbage and bacon. Starters of Brixham scallops, black pudding and cauliflower are filling and well-seasoned, while puds include sweet banoffee pie with salted caramel drizzle. Portions are huge, wines are carefully paired to each dish, staff are “faultless” and the whole place “delivers every time”.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
St John

St John's Tavern

91 Junction Road, London, N19 5QU

The good folk at the strapping St John’s Tavern make no bones about their dedication to the food side of the operation – this is a pub of the gastro variety, with a retro finish, where the triumvirate of rustic tucker, cracking real ales and European wines keeps the punters happy. The Victorian-era space with its generous proportions is ideal for hosting both casual drinkers and full-on diners; shabby-chic decor confirms the everyman appeal. The kitchen’s repertoire, listed on blackboard menus, is grounded in British cooking, yet looks to the European mainland for further inspiration. Provenance is an evident watchword. Kick off with grilled herring with pickled tomato, or a classic fish soup, and then dive into English rose veal chop with wild mushrooms, or lemon sole with a Mediterranean spin. Puds have the same Brit/Euro mash-up, and Sunday lunch will warm your cockles – especially if you sit by the open fire.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Gun

The Gun

27 Coldharbour, London, London, E14 9NS

“If the sun comes out on the terrace, there’s nowhere better”, declares a fan of The Gun and its striking riverside position. Pints have been poured at this Docklands site for 250 years (famous drinkers include both Lord Nelson and Tinie Tempah), but the boozer passed into London food history as one of Ed and Tom Martin’s first gastropubs. Now owned by Fuller’s brewery, it’s still an “amazing location” full of possibilities for lazy Sundays – try the whole roast Suffolk chicken for two. Otherwise, bangers and mash are a speciality in the bar, alongside beer-friendly snacks including devilled whitebait. The restaurant set-up is smarter, with posh dishes such as seared scallops with brown onion consommé, charred button onions, grilled leeks and white onion purée followed by roast Yorkshire pheasant with sour pear jus or cod fillet with braised fennel fondue. Beers reflect the pub’s ownership, and there’s a full roster of food-friendly wines.

Under £30
British
Gastropub
The Marksman

The Marksman

254 Hackney Road, London, London, E2 7SJ

This stylish born-again boozer is a co-creation from chefs Tom Harris (ex-St John) and Jon Rotheram (ex-Fifteen). They've gone with tradition on the ground floor, refurbishing the bar, but upstairs you'll find a highly original dining room with a woven ceiling and zany lino floor in primary colours. One menu is served throughout, with signatures such as kid goat curry, beef and barley bun or honey and brown butter tart alongside less attention-grabbing (but delicious) items including cod with leeks and brown crab or Tamworth pork with hispi cabbage and mustard. To drink, pick an Old World wine or join the locals for a pint of Meantime Yakima Red. Handy for Columbia Road flower market on Sundays, when the pub serves brunch and roast lunches.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
One michelin star
The Harwood Arms

The Harwood Arms

Walham Grove, London, London, SW6 1QP

‘Not your average gastropub’ says the tagline, and for once the hype is fully justified. This Fulham boozer has been a pack leader for many years, staking its claim with urbane ingredients-led cooking and handsome gentrified interiors (bare-boarded floors, chunky wood furniture, mirrors and monochrome photos on pastel walls), all overseen by starry backers (it’s co-owned by Brett Graham of The Ledbury). The Harwood Arms kitchen specialises in remarkably seasonal British victuals – including bags of furred and feathered game (roast Berkshire deer with baked carrot, pickled walnuts and juniper, for example). Other highlights from the daily fixed-price menu might range from the famous crab muffins or new season’s beetroots with smoked eel, pumpernickel and purple rocket to calendar-tuned desserts such as blackberry and bay-leaf trifle with brown sugar meringues or cherries with vanilla cream and a brandy snap. It may tout a Michelin star, but The Harwood Arms still trades as a dyed-in-the-wool watering hole, serving pints of real ale, venison Scotch eggs and cauliflower croquettes to the drinkers, and making a big splash with its sell-out Sunday roasts – although the serious wine list is several notches above the pub norm.   

£30 - £49
Gastropub
One michelin star
Parlour

Parlour

5 Regent Street, London, NW10 5LG

Main man Jesse Dunford Wood has a wacky sense of humour, but he's a serious chef – no wonder fans say his all-purpose venue is "a really fun place" noted for its consistently good food, infectious vibe and generous hospitality. The comfortable, light-filled bar is a great place for breakfast and all-day snacks, but most people head to the dining room for tongue-in-cheek British food. Seasonal ideas such as red-legged partridge with clementines and game chips or herb-crusted cod with roast squash appear right on cue, although some "hearty" dishes are fixtures – especially the 'cow pie' with glazed suet-crust pastry. Elsewhere, 'back door' smoked salmon is advertised with 'that soda bread', and the reworked chicken Kiev means no more garlic butter spurting down your front. Kids have their own little menu, while grown-ups can trawl the wine list, sip cocktails or sup craft ale at the bar.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Camberwell Arms

The Camberwell Arms

65 Camberwell Church Street, London, SE5 8TR

Fans of Southwark’s renowned Anchor & Hope and its spin-off The Canton Arms will find many similarities at this handsome Camberwell boozer from the same stable. The ox-blood walls, bistro chairs and dishes to share (rib of South Devon beef, say, or spit-roast chicken for two or four) could have been lifted from its elder siblings, along with the accessible, reasonably priced wine list. But this is no identikit chain, so the kitchen has produced its own take on the gutsy cooking for which the group is known – adding a touch of New York deli (house-smoked pastrami and pickles), the American South (barbecue chicken wings) and even North Africa (punchy house-produced goat merguez matched with spiced aubergine, bulgur wheat and garlic yoghurt). At lunchtime, you’ll find a pared-down version of the evening menu, though there’s usually a hearty pie for two to share. A first-floor cocktail bar adds drinks appeal.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Empress

The Empress

130 Lauriston Road, London, E9 7LH

Right next to Victoria Park, this regal Empress receives a number of important local dignitaries throughout the day: the fishmonger, the butcher, the baker… all pay their respects here. As a result, chef Elliott Lidstone’s menu is a celebration of the foodie scene flourishing on his doorstep – though his influences are more global. Bold, bright seasonal flavours are the cornerstones, witness prettily presented, shareable plates of fried duck egg and trompettes on toast or cured sea trout with orange, fennel and hazelnut. These vie for attention with generous mains of roast pork belly and apple sauce or cod with Moroccan-spiced chickpeas, monk’s beard, yoghurt and sumac. Other attractions at this art-filled bistro include “great” weekend brunch, £10 Monday suppers, BYO ‘frugal feasts’ and all-day tapas-style snacks to go with London beers, classic cocktails and modern wines from hotly tipped producers. Sadly, the service is less consistent than the food.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The Cow - Westbourne Park Road

The Cow - Westbourne Park Road

89 Westbourne Park Road, London, W2 5QH

In 2015, Tom Conran celebrated 20 years at The Cow by giving the place a makeover – well, the upstairs dining rooms at least. The ground-floor pub and terrace remain pleasantly scruffy, while the restaurant has been enlarged and smartened up with red leather banquettes, a matching colourful floor and quirky modern art. Thankfully there’s been no consequent hike in prices and the menu remains reassuringly unaltered wherever you eat: pâté with piccalilli, fresh soups, sausages and mash and so on. Shellfish and crustacea are the perennial stars (don’t miss the oysters and dressed crab), while daily specials ring the changes – from a trendy plate of smoked trout with fennel, samphire, orange and tarragon salad to stonking rib of beef with perky green peppercorn butter. You can order ales and Guinness in the pub, and there’s a refined wine list to choose from too.
£30 - £49
Gastropub
£50 - £79
The Havelock Tavern

The Havelock Tavern

57 Masbro Road, London, W14 0LS

With its shimmering blue-tiled frontage and brickwork that matches the surrounding housing, The Havelock Tavern recalls the golden age of British pubs. Times have changed, but the good folk here in Masbro Road have the best of both worlds – a proper pub and somewhere to eat first-rate grub with a modern rustic spin. The interior is opened up and suitably bare (with rough wooden tables and mismatched chairs); the bar is stocked with beers from the likes of Battersea’s Sambrook’s Brewery and Truman’s of east London. Everything, from the bread to the ice cream, is made in-house and the menu crosses international borders with impunity: mussels infused with South-East Asian flavours, Greek lamb rump, and roasted fillet of cod dished up with a white bean and smoked bacon casserole. Then it’s back home for treacle tart with double cream. Outside, the patio garden is a fair-weather friend: another asset of this gem of a pub.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
The White Swan Pub & Dining Room

The White Swan Pub & Dining Room

108 Fetter Lane, London, EC4A 1ES

It's a wrench to tear yourself away from the cosy wood-panelled bar on the ground floor at The White Swan but it's not such a sacrifice when you have a seat reserved in the dining room upstairs. Pristine white tablecloths, heavy leather chairs and a mirrored ceiling lend the place a clubby, urbane air, and the cooking is the perfect complement – in other words, sophisticated restaurant food rather than the pub grub served downstairs (think rib and shin burgers with smoked Cheddar). The kitchen puts its own spin on the classic repertoire – such as a pea velouté with ham-hock Scotch quail's egg or a bouillabaisse of red mullet, scallops and cod cheeks with saffron potatoes. For dessert, treacle tart is paired with zingy lemon and yoghurt ice cream. Wines start at £19, with the upper end dominated by France.

Gastropub