Fera at Claridge's 333

Claridge's, Brook Street , London, W1K 4HR

020 7107 8888

Visit Fera at Claridge's

SquareMeal Review of Fera at Claridge's

SquareMeal London Hot 100 2018Simon Rogan may have left the Claridge’s fold, but Michelin-starred Fera is still turning heads with protégé Matt Starling at the helm. The restaurant’s name means ‘wild’ in Latin, and the menu showcases carefully sourced and foraged native ingredients in a line-up of wondrous, highly sophisticated dishes “created with great imagination”: a devilled scallop flavoured with mushroom and pine (served in its shell on a bed of pebbles) or raw Dexter beef partnered by a sliver of smoked cauliflower, sweet cicely and shiso – an elegant take on beef tartare that combines earthy notes with a fresh citrus zing. Elsewhere, Cornish lamb and belly with king oyster mushrooms packs an umami punch, while anise and hyssop mousse matched with sweet soft cheese delivers delicate herbal freshness. Left-field wine pairings feature ‘natural’ tipples from small producers, service shows the expected Claridge’s polish, and the setting marries the hotel’s traditional art-deco styling with a soothing palate of muted greens and browns. For the full Fera experience, however, we recommend booking a place at the six-table ‘development kitchen’ to explore a raft of more experimental dishes. Clearly, this restaurant still has the power to surprise, with readers regularly reaching for the superlatives.

Fera at Claridge's is recommended for

Big And Bold | Formal | Glamorous | Quiet Conversation | Widely Spaced Tables | Group Dining 8 Plus | Special Occasions Under 40S | One Michelin Star

Special offers

Taste of Fera and a glass of Champagne £85

5 course tasting menu with snacks. Please note this offer is not combinable with 1,000 points programme.

From: 01 December 2017

To: 31 August 2018

Max: 7

Maximum of 7 diners. Includes VAT, excludes service.

Summer at Fera: 3 Courses, Wine, Water, Coffee £55

3 courses from a set menu including ½ bottle or 2 glasses of wine from the sommelier’s selection, 330ml mineral water, house tea/coffee. Please note that all tables are allocated for 120 minutes. Please note this offer is not combinable with 1,000 points program.

From: 01 July 2018

To: 31 August 2018

Max: 7

Maximum of 7 diners. Includes Tax, excludes service.

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Nearby Tube/Rail Stations

Bond Street Tube Station 218m

Oxford Circus Tube Station 558m

Address

Address: Claridge's, Brook Street , London W1K 4HR

Area: Mayfair Oxford Street

Opening times

Mon-Sun 12N-2pm 6.30-10pm

Nearby Landmarks

Bonhams 145m

Fenwick of Bond Street 208m

Details

Telephone: 020 7107 8888

Website:

Cuisine: British

Lunch: £35/45 (2/3 courses)

Dinner: £85/95/125 (3/6/10 courses)

Private Dining: 12

8.9

Food & Drink: 9.1

Service: 8.7

Atmosphere: 8.1

Value: 7.7

Food & Drink: 3.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 4.0

Mike S. bronze reviewer 12 December 2017

My friend is going to hate me for this review, but I just don't get Fera... Maybe I'm choosing wrong? Maybe my pallet just isn't up to the genius that is Fera but every time I've come here I always feel let down by my main course. I'll go through to positives first, the space is one of the best in London, big dinning area with a fantastic centerpiece of a white tree, fantastic stained glass in the ceiling and big windows means the area is always well lit, perfect for those Instragram selfies and food pictures. Service is impeccable as you'd expect with friendly and passionate staff and the wine is always fantastic. Maybe it's my fault, then, my friend loves it more than she loves 1920s themed cocktail bars, which is a lot, but every time I've ordered the fish I've always felt it was slightly undercooked, resulting in me not being able to eat it all and feeling slightly queasy... This time's offender was hake in savoy cabbage. Everything else is always delicious, and the dessert I had I could have eaten 10 of, a fantastic quince, honey and marzipan course. I'll come back, I have to for my friend's sake. I'll just have to be more astute with my ordering...

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 4.0

jasmine h. 10 September 2017

Fera was a surprise, the food is very sophisticated, localy sourced and created with great imagination. We had the 5 dish tasting menu(£85). It was excellent and so good I actually added 2 more dishes. Great place for a celebratory evening. I will go back

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 3.0

Atmosphere: 2.0

Value: 4.0

Paul A. platinum reviewer 07 April 2016

Surprisingly the restaurant was no more than half-full which muted the ambience somewhat, but as the evening wore on and we worked our way through the updated tasting menu we noticed this less and less. Our reasonably priced (unlike some of the other wines on show) English fizz aperitif (Davenport Limney) was accompanied by chick pea mousse with a rosemary crisp and curd cheese artistically decorated with assorted flowers and leaves. As usual there was a multiplicity of hors d’oeuvres with a smoked seaweed cracker, scallop cream and alexanders making a comeback at the expense of celery; stewed rabbit with lovage cream, and caramelised onion in a tapioca flour bhaji; unctuous yet light, aerated Tunworth, three-cornered garlic and slow-cooked duck heart; and mushroom cake with juniper providing a sweet undertone, fennel, inoki mushrooms and a finish of subtle pine. Then we were on to the starters, four of them, starting with raw scallop, salsify cooked in squid ink, pearl barley, anise and a whey and verjus sauce; followed by raw veal in a crunchy kohlrabi wrap, apple and a sauce redolent of oyster; next came white crab meat with a delightful compressed rhubarb sauce and goat’s milk yoghurt; the final plate was sea-fresh Fowey mussels with crispy hispi, toasted sunflower seeds and an unidentified pale ale. Moving on to the mains, we found the cod disappointingly sous-vide-like and it didn’t really work with the hen of the woods mushrooms, crispy-skinned Jerusalem artichoke and roasted artichoke sauce. The Cornish lamb was properly tender and reasonably well supported by roast chicory, turnip disks and a purée probably of turnip tops but tasting like kale. The two desserts varied in their appeal: the buckwheat cream and stout ice cream? with verjus was unconvincing, whereas there was a perfect balance between all the elements in the sheep’s milk yoghurt mousse, rapeseed cake, honey, juniper, and tarragon sorbet. On our previous visits we had been quite convinced that this L’Enclume offshoot was at least as good as its Cumbrian cousin. This time the wow factor was not so evident.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 5.0

Paul A. platinum reviewer 31 August 2015

This was one of those occasions when you wonder whether the second visit will be up to the first, especially when you have been thoroughly convinced that, whatever the doyenne of food criticism may have thought, a restaurant actually fully merits another star. Happily we found that we had absolutely no reason to change our minds. The art deco glamour of the imposing dining room, the expert service by the well-trained, interactively skilled and knowledgeable staff, the attractive menu of dishes cooked to perfection by a kitchen which has the technical prowess to produce imaginative dishes without having to exaggerate, all combine to offer a positive, top-class dining experience. We were lucky enough to have a table opposite the kitchen, and it was clear that everything was proceeding smoothly throughout, even on a busy Saturday evening, which gave us confidence from the start that all would be well with our meal. The tasting menu bore more than a passing resemblance to its May predecessor, and we were in the mood for one or two bigger helpings, so we went à la carte. A good choice as it turned out since as well as the beautiful blue cheese foam on chickpea crisps with edible flowers with our champagne, we were treated to five amuse-bouches/starters, including a sensational brand new one. We had raved about the rabbit in onion crumbs with lovage cream, the seaweed crisp with its filling of fish roe cream and nasturtium leaves, and the pea mousse with cod and calamint on previous Rogan occasions, but now added to these we were able to exalt in crispy cheese and onion ashes, which were basically cheese and onion crisps Mayfair style, and, the star of the opening act, a striking combination of lardo and smoked eel in potato canelloni with horseradish sauce, which gave rise to a string of exclamations announcing the wow factor, and something that continued with the following courses. The rich, luscious lobster was made even more special by the quite amazing black garlic emulsion and perfect chicken wing, not to mention a light, tasty anise hyssop foam and baby potatoes done in chicken fat, and our second main course of possibly water-bathed but nonetheless excellent halibut in pine oil was distinguished by three variations on turnip, including a sauce, a mix with spring onion sticks, and a sticky concoction with truffle, and heightened by a squid ink and truffle emulsion. Then came what passed for a palate cleanser/pre-dessert, but which was well worthy of inclusion on the dessert menu - freeze-dried blueberries, yoghurt, crunchy honey cake, lemon thyme and blackcurrant snow. The desserts were also memorable, the first a strawberry macaroon-like texture with the signature sweet cicely custard, buttermilk and sorrel from the Cartmel farm, and a totally historic mélange of rock pumpernickel ice cream, apricot and Assam tea sauce, wonderful goat's cheese and simply mind-blowing macerated cherries, which climaxed an evening full of class.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 5.0

Paul A. platinum reviewer 02 June 2015

We've had some very good lunches in the last few months, including one that we thought was the best ever. Well, Fera was right up there with the best. And, after this, and following our recent disappointments in starred venues in the north-west, we are coming to the conclusion that there are more and more reasons for indulging in the highest quality of fine dining in London and more or less giving up engaging in wearisome journeys to the rest of the country (with the notable exceptions of Port Isaac, Bray, Amersham and Oxton). Here at Claridges, once you've found and negotiated the dark and unimpressive entrance to the dining room, you are treated to the impressive Grand Room with all its art deco charm and the wonderful glass panels in the ceiling, the very professional and properly interactive staff make you feel very welcome and the atmosphere is immediately one of relaxed class. In addition, and unlike our bad luck elsewhere a couple of weeks before, there were two top chefs present, Dan Cox and David Simms, ensuring that the highest standards were achieved and maintained throughout. The tasting menu comes at a London price level, but in our opinion is well worth the money, and the wine flight comprises a series of well-chosen, perfectly matching organic selections in accordance with the Rogan philosophy. We started with an English organic fizz, the Davenport from West Sussex, opted for the tasting menu and sat back to enjoy what promised to be a belter judging from our initial exchanges with our two main interlocutors, Toni on food and Alessia on drink, and from the light, palate-provoking rosemary wafer with elderflower jelly and cream we sampled with the fizz. Given that it was lunchtime and that we were going to be getting four types of amuse-bouche, four starters, two mains, two desserts and three mignardises, we were a bit apprehensive at the possibility of a lunchtime tempo, but not a bit of it. Mind you it was four hours later that we left, having had an instructive visit to the kitchen, whence a stupendous sequence of dishes had emerged giving rise to an unremitting sequence of words of pleasure such as we remembered pronouncing on our first visit to L'enclume. The plates were all beautifully presented works of art which individually and in their ensemble made perfect sense and made for a perfect all-round balance throughout the meal so that we left the restaurant replete but not overstuffed and already recalling the masterly contrasts and accords of the three Ts - tastes, textures and temperatures - we had savoured. The light, warm rabbit faux Scotch eggs in mild onion crumbs were terrific and enhanced by a beautiful lovage cream; the fish roe cream decorated with nasturtium leaves on seaweed was out of this world; the delicate beef tendon and onion puff was sweet and light; the quirky sweet and earthy beetroot soup with freeze-dried yoghurt and contrasting oxalis leaf was a fitting climax to the first courses. The first starter was a perfect stage for asparagus with asparagus juice poured on smoked egg yolk and salty crispy ham making a perfect partner along with surprising pickled mushrooms and some minty perilla; then came tender raw veal wrapped in kohlrabi and oyster and apple jus the acidity of which was surprisingly softened by the veal and neatly finished off with apple marigold from the Cartmel farm. We found inestimable pleasure in what sounded like a prosaic vegetarian dish described as grilled salad smoked over embers, Isle of Mull, truffle custard and sunflower seeds, but actually crispy smoky lettuce leaves nestled in cheese sauce, truffled cauliflower and broccoli, and the truffle custard just blew your mind! No wonder it was the star dish at the 2012 Great British Menu banquet! The first main was a turbot dish that had more artistic validity than any recent Turner Prize entry and the fish, finished in the pan after the water bath, with its mussel companion, courgette and courgette flower, complements of sea lettuce, fennel and rapeseed and an amazing tomato granola was definitiely worth a prize. Curiously, we found the à point Cornish lamb far more to our taste than its Cumbrian cousin which we had at L'enclume, possibly because it had more taste, especially the marvellous sweetbread, and also because the sheep's milk yoghurt and emulsion, the lovely white asparagus, the ramsons and the allium somehow produced a more rounded dish. The desserts were gorgeous, the brilliant honeycomb with pear in a superb combination with lemon thyme, and perfect strawberries with cicely custard, and a counterpoint of sorrel and buttermilk crunch rounded off our splendid meal. And, finally, excellence of this lunch emphasised a point that we have become convinced of, namely that anyone associated with the restaurant trade and any self-respecting foodie will be justifiably certain that fine dining in the UK is at least as good as it is in France, but the number of starred restaurants in the former is a disproportionately low one quarter of those in the latter. It is time Michelin recognised that it is out of step with reality, started promoting the UK scene and had the courage to award a significantly greater number of stars at all three levels.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 4.0

Foodess platinum reviewer 02 April 2015

Bright pink and violet flowers garnishing a blob of delicately tangy cream on a wafer thin base demanded pause for admiration. Once very contentedly munched, the palate was suitably aroused and prepared for a mouthful of deliciously, soft rabbit which had been formed to resemble a tiny defensive hedgehog whose spikes provided the contrasting crunch. Third and identically ranked in taste preference was a cheese and potato pot with duck heart confit at the base - heart from such a small creature was thankfully only miniscule and although described as confit the tiny cubed muscle had quite a firm texture – the highlight for me was the punchy cheese flavour. A generous portion of crab meat and mousse with yoghurt for starter was so pleasing that I didn’t mourn not trying the smoked lobster. Outstandingly yummo was halibut with wild mushrooms, crushed Jerusalem artichoke, spinach, laced with a perfect granola and the all-important truffle - each and every component delivered on taste, texture and put together in such a harmoniously balanced way to hit the bulls-eye for ultimate satisfaction. This proved that the master of masters had organised and trained his troops in the capital to rival the best of the best. The wine was a stunning Cote de Nuits which blew a significant portion of the budget, the source of which was courtesy of Squaremeal - thank you. Such amazing food however, just about managed to justify the classy match. My dearest’s description of his meal as ‘spectacular’ surprised me because he had always claimed l’Enclume and Roganic to be more her style than his. However, here he liked the option of a more traditional a la carte format enabling him to choose what he fancied; on this occasion swede dumplings in a sauce perfumed with truffle, followed by lamb two-ways. Dessert list sounded so tempting and interesting, that after some indecision we chose three : apple, rhubarb and clementine. Special mention goes to the forced rhubarb, perhaps because I just happen to love rhubarb when done properly. Impeccably attentive, yet unobtrusive service completed an experience in the superlative. This was my first time at Claridges, and now to hopefully soon be one of many in their Fera dining space with opulent glass-panelled ceiling coupled with a subtle modern, organic touch. If you hadn’t guessed, then Fera soars straight to the top of my list.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 4.0

Rebecca L. gold reviewer 16 February 2015

I was a huge fan of Gordon Ramsey at Claridges so was very excited to try Fera. It is certainly different - far more modern and relaxed (although I wouldn't go as far to describe the setting and atmosphere as 'informal' as some people have - you definitely still feel you're at Claridges). We visited on a Sunday lunch time and dined from the set lunch menu, priced very reasonably at £30 a head. It's very limited, as you'd expect from a lunch menu somewhere like this, only two dishes per course but between us we tried everything and honestly couldn't fault a morsel. The flavours are sublime and at times very unusual but never for the sake of being different. Food wise, everything is flawless - from the actual dishes to the bread, amuse bouche and petit fours. The service is quite muted and hands off which I liked to some extent but very occasionally it felt a little too hurried. I think it's supposed to add the more informal feel of the restaurant but didn't always strike the right chord with me. That said, it really didn't detract from the food and I'm being very picky. Overall, I had a wonderful time and shall certainly be returning for dinner. An absolute gem of a restaurant for a special occasion.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 3.0

London Gourmet platinum reviewer 08 December 2014

Finally London has the chance to experience Simon Rogan's food again following the closure of his temporary Roganic venue (btw one of the closings I felt most sad about in recent years). The main difference with Fera is its more upmarket settings and more refined food - both not really surprising given the location within Claridges I'm sure most people will by now know about his food (including the famous foraging he is know for). Upon first visiting (or even as repeat costumer) I guess most people will go for the tasting menu as it gives a wide range of different - and all excellent - food. For me one pointer for a great meal is if you can't name the top course, simply because all of them have been great. Attentative service with the only small set-back being the fact that the atmosphere in such a comparatively large dinning room will always suffer somewhat

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 3.0

Value: 2.0

Deborah A. 13 August 2014

Lunch at Fera was a birthday surprise from my husband, so had no preconceived notions having never eaten at L'Enclume. Every dish had phenomenal depth of flavour and was pure beauty on the plate. Service was attentive without being obsequious. Only three tables occupied over several hours though (with one occupied by someone spending more time photographing his food than eating it) so by no means a special atmosphere. A warning: wines by the glass are an embarrassing rip-off, with most above £20.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 5.0

James S. 08 July 2014

Just that – it's perfect

  • Fera at Claridge
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Experience Fera at Claridge’s almost as nature intended: choose to dine privately in a beautiful space for up to 12 people.

Private Dining Room
Capacity: 12
Special offers

Taste of Fera and a glass of Champagne £85

From: 01 December 2017

To: 31 August 2018

Max: 7

Maximum of 7 diners. Includes VAT, excludes service.

Summer at Fera: 3 Courses, Wine, Water, Coffee £55

From: 01 July 2018

To: 31 August 2018

Max: 7

Maximum of 7 diners. Includes Tax, excludes service.