The best Prosecco for 2020: What we think and where you can buy it

Move over, Champagne - this fizz is more affordable and just as delicious

Updated on 24 February 2020 • Written By Deborah Reda

The best Prosecco for 2020: What we think and where you can buy it

As Brits drink more Prosecco than anyone else, including the Italians who produce it, we thought the time was ripe for a guide to the best Prosecco on the market right now. You might ask what qualifies us to decide what constitutes the ‘best Prosecco’, and the simple answer is that we drink it all the time. We know what you’re thinking – what a hard life for SquareMeal writers! But it’s not all sipping chilled glasses of fizz, you know; we’ve suffered a fair few hangovers for our craft. (Okay, we’re fibbing, it wasn’t a hardship at all and we never drink to excess.)

Chances are you’ll have sampled a few of the labels on this list already, as many are actually supermarkets’ own brands, but we recommend giving any that you haven’t tried a whirl, as they’re all refreshing and delicious. And you don’t even need to wait for an occasion, as there’s no designated time of day to enjoy this elegant drink; plus there are always plenty of Prosecco offers that make it the same price or less than a regular bottle of wine.

We won’t go on, as we know you’re eager to get to our list of the best Prosecco brands to try right now, but we did just want to share a few facts about Prosecco that we learned from our friends over at the premium Prosecco brand, Mionetto Prosecco. As producers of one of the UK’s best-selling Proseccos they know a thing or two about Italy’s effervescent export, the most interesting of which (we think) is that ‘extra dry’ is not the driest Prosecco. ‘Brut’ Prosecco is, in fact, the driest while ‘dry’ actually describes fairly sweet Prosecco.

Next fun fact: like Champagne, in order to be classed as ‘Prosecco’, the sparkling wine must be produced in the Veneto region of Italy and the best way to be sure your fizz is authentic is to look out for the DOC or DOCG seal on the bottle. The most important nugget we want to share with you, though? Prosecco contains fewer calories than our favourite gin and tonic. Cheers to that!

 

Mionetto Prosecco DOC Treviso Brut

What: You can’t go wrong with a bottle of Mionetto Prosecco – its entire range is stylish and delicious, after all – but we’re particularly partial to its so-called ‘Orange Label’ for its aromatic notes of apple, honey, white peach, and acacia blossom. Light, fresh and dangerously moreish, it’s great as an aperitivo, as an accompaniment to food or sipped from a chilled flute at any time of the day or night.
 Buy it: £19.99, Ocado

 

Aldi Prosecco Superiore DOCG

What: There’s a reason Prosecco drinkers flock to Aldi to stock up on its Prosecco Superiore DOCG, and it’s not just price (though £7.49 a bottle is a steal for sure). The hundreds of five-star reviews praise its perfect balance – not too sweet and not too dry – as well as its creamy taste and smooth texture. We also love its gentle bubbles and the fact that it as works well in cocktails as it does when drunk on its own.
Buy it: £7.49, Aldi

 

Sacchetto Col de L'Utia Prosecco Brut

What: Pushing the boat out for a special occasion, such as a wedding or Christmas party? Order a case of Sacchetto Col de L'Utia Prosecco and watch your guests’ smiles light up. As it’s a Brut Prosecco it’s very dry, almost like Champagne, but its zingy flavours which include lemon, lime and gooseberry keep it lively. It pairs particularly well with fish and seafood, but works just as well as an aperitivo.
Buy it: £14.99, Naked Wines

 

Freixenet Prosecco

What: Fancy bottles are definitely a plus when it comes to buying a bottle of bubbly, but only if what’s inside is as impressive as the vessel. Luckily, when it comes to Freixenet Prosecco, it’s a case of style and substance, as the pale golden liquid within is crisp, light and refreshing. Notes of citrus, including lemon and grapefruit, are sweetened by crisp apple and floral aromas, culminating in a smooth and highly-sippable Prosecco that’s ideal for a big event or your next special party.
Buy it: £12, Waitrose

 

Tesco Finest Prosecco Valdobbiadene Docg

What: Prosecco connoisseurs (including us) rave about this Tesco Prosecco, not only because it tastes incredible, but because it’s just a tenner a bottle! The quality of the grapes, which come from the slopes of Valdobbiadene, translate into superior flavours, including peach, pear and white blossom, which go particularly well with canapès and summer salads. That’s not to say you can’t toast with it on Christmas morning, though – this Prosecco is definitely an all-season fizz.
Buy it: £10, Tesco

 

ASDA Extra Special Prosecco Asolo Brut DOCG

What: Asda Prosecco might sound like a budget option – and at just £8 a bottle, it’s certainly wallet-friendly – but in terms of taste, it really lives up to its claim of being ‘extra special’. Fruity and fragrant, it contains notes of wild flowers and ripe stone-fruits that balance its depth with a light, refreshing taste. Another one that works all year round.
Buy it: £8, Asda

 

Lidl Allini Prosecco Spumante

What: It might be the cheapest prosecco on this list, but that’s definitely not to say it’s the least tasty. With undertones of pear, citrus and lychee, this Lidl Prosecco provides an elegantly-balanced sip that’s ideal for getting a party started. It also pairs well with cichetti (but then, very few Proseccos don’t).
Buy it: £5.99, Lidl

 

Aldi Organic Prosecco

What: The market for organic Prosecco is getting stronger all the time, but it’s still not too easy to find a decent one at most supermarkets. Fortunately, Aldi does a delightful organic Prosecco that not only tastes light and fresh, but comes in a gorgeous bottle too. A superb aperitivo, this eco-friendly fizz is produced on the Corvezzo family’s 150-hectare estate, where grapes are grown without pesticides or herbicides and are predominately hand-picked. The winery also uses renewable energy wherever possible, so if you’re conscious about the environment, this delicious bubbly is a great shout.
Buy it: £7.99, Aldi

 

Canti Prosecco Spumante

What: Dry and crisp, Canti Prosecco is always a safe bet when faced with a choice of unknown labels. Beautifully pale, Canti Prosecco evokes flavours of green apples, honey and fragrant flowers and is pleasantly bubbly without being excessive. Canti produces a whole range of bubbly, including Asti, rosé and organic prosecco.
Buy it: £10, Tesco

 

Morrisons The Best Valdobbiadene Prosecco

What: Not only is Morrisons Prosecco tasty and affordable, it’s also suitable for vegans – bonus! Made with grapes sourced from the best area in Italy, Conegliano Valdobbiadene, Morrisons The Best Valdobbiadene delivers intense flavours of fresh green apple and pear and overtones of apple blossom.
Buy it: £10, Morrisons

 

Looking for the French version? Check out our guide to the best Champagne for special celebrations.