Best restaurants in Fulham

Looking for a restaurant in Fulham? We’ve done the hard work so you don’t have to, and compiled a handy list of the best. Whatever your budget or taste, SquareMeal is here to help, with a selection of the best restaurants for every occasion. Read on for our pick of the best restaurants in Fulham.

Updated on 24 August 2018

Best restaurants in Fulham


The Harwood Arms

The Harwood Arms

£30 - £49
Gastropub
One michelin star

Walham Grove, London, SW6 1QP

‘Not your average gastropub’ says the tagline, and for once the hype is fully justified. This Fulham boozer has been a pack leader for many years, staking its claim with urbane ingredients-led cooking and handsome gentrified interiors (bare-boarded floors, chunky wood furniture, mirrors and monochrome photos on pastel walls), all overseen by starry backers (it’s co-owned by Brett Graham of The Ledbury). The Harwood Arms kitchen specialises in remarkably seasonal British victuals – including bags of furred and feathered game (roast Berkshire deer with baked carrot, pickled walnuts and juniper, for example). Other highlights from the daily fixed-price menu might range from the famous crab muffins or new season’s beetroots with smoked eel, pumpernickel and purple rocket to calendar-tuned desserts such as blackberry and bay-leaf trifle with brown sugar meringues or cherries with vanilla cream and a brandy snap. It may tout a Michelin star, but The Harwood Arms still trades as a dyed-in-the-wool watering hole, serving pints of real ale, venison Scotch eggs and cauliflower croquettes to the drinkers, and making a big splash with its sell-out Sunday roasts – although the serious wine list is several notches above the pub norm.   

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The Malt House

The Malt House

£30 - £49
Gastropub

17 Vanston Place, London, SW6 1AY

This dressed-up SW6 gastropub with rooms originally dates back to 1729. By 1900 the pub was known as The Jolly Maltster and despite a major overhaul in 2013, many of the building’s standout Victorian features remain -think wood panelling, high ceilings and tasteful décor. Chef Oliver Tobias is behind the Bosi-approved menu, with classics such as steak, Guinness and mushroom pie or charcoal barbecued steaks alongside a list of seasonal specials. Sundays are a good excuse for a meaty feast of Duke of Buccleuch roast steak, pork belly or corn fed chicken breast, while sweet finishes include apricot and almond tart or white chocolate ice cream with biscotti. Berry Brothers & Rudd consult on the international wine list, there’s a range of craft lagers and cocktails and a snug, sheltered garden in which to enjoy them.

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Claude

Claude's Kitchen

£50 - £79
Modern European

51 Parsons Green, London, SW6 4JA

Canny Claude Compton has struck exactly the right chord with his quietly brilliant little bistro above the Amuse Bouche Champagne bar. The low-lit, low-key ambience might be more rive gauche than haute cuisine, but the upcycled furniture, stripped floors and chirpy staff belie the ambition behind the pass. The kitchen has plenty of fun with flavour and texture on its weekly menu, pairing squid and seared tuna with confit lemon, hemp seeds and herbaceous lovage foam or introducing vanilla notes into a pretty plate of smoked eel, dressed with grated horseradish and wispy fennel tops. Desserts also turn heads – perhaps blackberry and fig, with quark soft cheese, porridge tart and lavender flowers. The fact that it manages to pull off these dishes is testament to serious talent and lightness of touch, as well as inventiveness. If that sounds sufficiently colourful and brilliant, we recommend considering the excellent-value tasting menu, with its on-point wine pairings.

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The Little Blue Door

The Little Blue Door

International

871-873 Fulham Road, London, SW6 5HP

Fulham’s Little Blue Door is a restaurant and bar which imitates a house share, and everyone involved is 100% committed to the project. Reservations are made via WhatsApp, you have to ring the doorbell to be let in and there’s even a ‘utility room’ complete with bras hanging from a washing line and a dog bed. The kitchen acts as a supper-club space, the living room is the restaurant/bar and there’s a terrace for warm weather and post-work chilling.

It could all be a bit much, but Instagram-friendly features like the Prosecco vending machine and a neon ‘let’s get fizzical’ sign prove that The Little Blue Door doesn’t take itself too seriously, and neither do the fun-loving housemates (AKA the staff), who will probably be dancing on the bar come closing time.  

The menu is an international hodgepodge inspired by ‘the flatmates’ travels’. Expect to find crowd-pleasing dishes which boast subtly inventive twists on classic small plates: slithers of prosciutto served with juicy chunks of watermelon, or pimped-up chicken goujons involving intense, house-smoked strips of chicken wrapped in crispy panko breadcrumbs and served with a tarragon and roast garlic aioli.

The drinks, which are named after films, are fun too. We particularly enjoyed the Kill Bill – served in a teacup with an accompanying custard cream, this sip boasts a sour tang from lemon curd, before revealing its punchy depth from Earl Grey-infused gin. Buzzy, cool and lots of fun, this is one house party you’ll want an invite to.

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Koji

Koji

£50 - £79
Japanese

58 New Kings Road, London, SW6 4LS

The reinvention of pan-Asian hangout Mao Tai as Japanese-themed Koji has done little to dampen local enthusiasm for this bubble of West End glitz in SW6. Now centred around a "gorgeous" sushi bar, its sleek lines and seductive lighting suggest serious dining – although there's plenty of fun to be had under the feather chandeliers too. Attention to detail is evident throughout, from the "incredible" cocktails (don’t miss the chilli and lemongrass Martini) and “best sushi in SW London” to trendy tapas plates (chicken and shiso gyoza, summer rolls with yuzu dressing) and knockout robata grills served on pretty artisan crockery – perhaps pork belly with spicy sweet miso or glazed salmon teriyaki. The kitchen is now in the hands of Rolando Ongcoy (from the distinguished Nobu stable), and readers are blown away by his “sublime food”, as well as Koji’s “terrific ambience” and “always great” service. Prices can be eye-watering, but this hotspot is still a "must-visit, even if you don't live in Parsons Green".

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Eelbrook

Eelbrook

£30 - £49
International

Eel Brook Common, New King’s Road, London, SW6 4SE

Given that its chef arrived at this leafy corner spot via Hix and Ducksoup, it's no surprise that Eelbrook oozes class and confidence. There are hints of the building's former incarnation as a café in the clean-cut interior, but the Mediterranean-inspired menu delivers far more than coffee and cake. Impeccable British ingredients are handled with creativity and care – from tender, flame-licked squid with vibrant coriander mojo sauce to Elwy lamb sirloin with almond-flecked skordalia and thyme-roasted apricots. Other hits include roast duck breast with sweet potato, cherries and pistachios, but our vote goes to a thick tranche of Dorset hake with a silky swirl of cauliflower purée and beurre noisette. No wonder the relaxed, chirpy staff seem so proud of the place. Eelbrook's "green and calm" terrace (now under cover) is another reason to take notice.

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Market Hall Fulham

Market Hall Fulham

Under £30
International

472 Fulham Road, London, SW6 1BY

The Edwardian booking office that served Fulham Broadway Underground station before today’s shopping-centre entrance rendered it redundant makes an imposing centrepiece at Market Hall. The dark wood surrounds have now been repurposed as a food and drink destination with nine individual kitchens – although the vibe is less cool street food, more shopping-mall food court.

Still, there are some decent traders, and you can mix-and-match your way around to create a fun lunch or no-fuss supper, with seating on high stools at communal benches. We’d recommend the gai prik at Farang spin-off Thima – pimped-up chicken nuggets in a tongue-pricking fish-sauce glaze – the omelette kati rolls at Calcutta Canteen – part dosa, part tortilla – and a cup of matcha ice cream from Soft Serve Society.

To drink, the old ‘tickets and assistance’ windows are where to order distinctly current sips: Pisco Sour, Mezcal Margarita; an Elijah Craig 12 Old Fashioned; or half a dozen draft crafts on rotation and a dozen good wines that won’t break the bank.

Further Market Halls are due at Oxford Circus and Victoria. It’s a nice – and child-friendly – idea for quick, quality cheap eats.

Interior image by Jim Stephenson

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Bistro Mirey

Bistro Mirey

£30 - £49
International

98 Lillie Road, London, SW6 7SR

Bistro Mirey is a genuine original in this cheerfully unfashionable part of Fulham, where Lillie Road meets North End Road. It’s a French bistro with Japanese influences, reflecting the backgrounds of classically trained chef Gerald Mirey and his partner Ko Ito, who provides financial nous and charming front of house.

This surprising but successful combination has become much loved by the locals, drawn by excellent cooking and a great atmosphere. There are wine and saké tastings with a saké master, tricolour-waving celebrations for Bastille Day, and supper clubs with informal Japanese lessons and a quiz. The menu interprets bistro classics through a subtle Japanese prism. The signature steak tartare uses knife-cut Charolais beef, with ginger, carrots, black sesame seeds, chilli and soy sauce, plus a few edamame beans adding colour and crunch. A summer menu may have watermelon marinated in Roku gin and served with feta, cucumber and candied hazelnuts. There’s a fine pork cutlet too, served teriyaki-style, but as this area is west London’s vegetarian-central, you’ll also find plenty of vegan and gluten-free dishes such as bonsai garden vegetables with wasabi pea purée.

French cooking dominates for puddings and cheese, while the drinks list reflects Gerald’s native Normandy, with cider, beer and Calvados appearing alongside French wines and Champagnes. But don’t miss the fascinating list of sakés and saké-based cocktails, which comes with clear explanations for beginners.

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Black Bream

Black Bream

£30 - £49
Modern European

177 New King's Road, London, SW6 4SW

The first outing from Leon Costa and Simon Phillips (ex-J Sheekey, Milk & Honey and Rick Stein), this classy well-designed newcomer also has kitchen pedigree with chefs from Le Caprice and The Ivy manning the stoves. Their aim is to bring some reasonably priced West End panache to the Sloaney heartland of Parsons Green – and judging by their regular local clientele, it looks as if they’re getting it just right.

Playful modern art, comfortable seating and a large suntrap terrace set the scene, while the menu revolves around a tempting roster of small plates notable for their carefully sourced ingredients and pleasing textures. Hand-chopped beef tartare is topped with a jaunty Parmesan crisp, and we also like the nicely charred but succulent lobster and langoustine burger with spicy mayo. Elsewhere, butch chunks of roast octopus and ‘nduja croquettes are partnered by smooth pea purée and creamy mozzarella, while the signature ceviche of black bream is all dressed up with pink grapefruit segments, avocado and a polite scattering of chilli.

If you’re ravenous, order the 14oz New York strip steak with punchy chimichurri sauce or grilled whole sea bream with capers and brown butter. For afters, Eton mess adds the satisfying crunch of meringue to summer berries, while roast peaches are perked up with amaretto crumb and bitter chocolate ice cream. Wines come by the glass or carafe, but also visit the handsome bar for some cracking cocktails.

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The Tommy Tucker

The Tommy Tucker

£30 - £49
British

22 Waterford Road, SW6 2DR

The trio behind Claude's Kitchen in Parsons Green wanted to open a pub that they'd be happy to call their local. The result is The Tommy Tucker – more restaurant than boozer (despite the choice of cask ales), with a metallic bar, open kitchen and scrubbed pine tables. Expect robust, fairly priced and confidently executed food featuring elegantly arranged seasonal ingredients. Top picks from our visit included three dense crunchy crab cakes mollified by the accompanying roasted garlic mayo, a slab of perfectly roasted hake and tender, flavoursome beef short-rib – butchered in-house, braised for eight hours then smoked. OK, a side of sweet-potato mash veered into baby-food territory, but we couldn't fault a beautifully boozy, rum-infused 'choc-ice' with moreish salted caramel cream. We'll be back.

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Sapori Sardi

Sapori Sardi

£30 - £49
Italian

786 Fulham Road, London, SW6 5SL

Loosely translated as ‘Sardinian flavours’, this cosy family-run newcomer on Fulham Road nails its regional colours to the mast with a menu that highlights the island’s rustic specialities and native produce. Come here for bowls of spaghetti laced with bottarga (dried mullet roe), malloreddus ‘gnocchi’ with sausage ragù and pecorino or monkfish wrapped in Sardinian air-dried ham (served with sautéed courgettes, chilli and mint). The kitchen also knocks out its share of trattoria staples, from grilled calamari with tangy salmoriglio dressing to seafood risotto and calf’s liver with butter and sage – as well as keeping the lunch crowd happy with fresh paninis and other light options. Alternatively, drop by for a shot of espresso and some fresh pastries for breakfast. Drinks include an interesting choice of Italian regional wines.

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RIGO’

RIGO’

£50 - £79
Italian

227 New Kings Road, London, SW6 4RD

Overlook the rather precious typography: RIGO’ is an Italian restaurant with an ambitious, wide-ranging menu that tests the talent and technique of well-travelled Piedmontese chef Gonzalo Luzarraga. He uses luxury and humble ingredients with respect and imagination: bone marrow with oscietra caviar, an umami hit of porcini and a bonito dashi, or oysters with salty plums and bitter puntarella (a variant of chicory), for example. The prix-fixe offers plenty of exceptional stuff, but it pays it pays to trade up to RIGO’s tasting menu – an extravaganza of flavours and textures, kicking off with snacks such as slivers of crispy tripe with salmon roe on home-baked sourdough. After that, we’d single out the chef’s take on bagna càuda involving a rich emulsion of sea urchin, fermented milk and quail’s egg, as well the gutsy Cinta Senese pork with broccoli, scallop coral and a plump oyster. To conclude, a luxurious spin on crème brûlée uses chestnut cream, porcini, black sesame and caramelised popcorn, and there are artisan cheeses with wild honey too. The restaurant itself is a long narrow space with pleasingly minimalist decor, while service is friendly and well informed.

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The Fulham Wine Rooms

The Fulham Wine Rooms

£30 - £49
Modern European

871-873 Fulham Rd, SW16 6QP

Treading the same oenophile path as its Kensington sibling, this handsome venue puts down a serious marker with 48 selections offered by the glass – thanks to an Enomatic system. If drinking's on your mind, head to the bar, bag a stool, purchase a 'wine card' and get stuck into the line-up of global vintages – with perhaps a few tapas plates on the side. Alternatively, the brick-clad dining room provides a relaxed setting for some rather sophisticated cooking, with suggested wine matches alongside each item on the evening menu: a glass of Sicilian Arianna Occhipinti Bianco with crab cakes and smoked chilli jelly; a 1er cru Chablis Domaine Billaud-Simon with sea bream, pak choy, oyster mushrooms and saffron sauce; a Luddite Shiraz 2008 (from the Cape) to complement ibérico pork presa and romesco sauce. Brunch is a good shout at the weekend, and regular wine events are a big draw.

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