The Waterside Inn 4444

Ferry Road, Bray , Maidenhead, SL6 2AT

14 reviews

176 French Berkshire

  • The Watershed Inn
  • The Watershed Inn Food

SquareMeal Review of The Waterside Inn

SquareMeal award hall of fame 1999-2018 logo badgeIts picture-book riverbank location may look and feel as English as The Wind in the Willows, but everything else at the three-Michelin-starred Waterside Inn speaks of top-end French gastronomy with a real sense of occasion – the culinary equivalent of haute couture. It’s all about silky sophistication and Gallic polish here, from the sumptuous furnishings and punctilious professionalism of the “impeccable” staff to the intricacies of the “perfectly executed” cooking. Expect a cavalcade of masterstrokes with that unmistakable Roux thumbprint: teasing amuse-bouches such as venison tartare on potato and whipped goats’ cheese; flaked Devon crab with ginger-scented cucumber jelly and oscietra caviar; fillet of turbot roasted in nut-brown butter with root vegetables, morels and vin jaune sauce; grilled pigeon breasts and crispy leg served with sweet pepper pipérade, potato terrine and ‘devil sauce’. After that, a cleansing granita sets things up for some truly astonishing showpiece desserts – perhaps chocolate cannelé with hazelnut praline and lime. “Everything par excellence”, drools an admirer. The wine list delves deep into the archives of French oenology and prices are scary, yet the sheer joy of dining at this serene stronghold of subtly reinvented haute cuisine is unsurpassed: “it’s hard to find a poor place to eat in Bray, but every visit feels incredibly special”, quips one admirer.

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Nearby Tube/Rail Stations

Maidenhead Station 1km

Taplow Station 1km

Address

Address: Ferry Road, Bray , Maidenhead SL6 2AT

Opening times

Wed-Sat 12N-2pm 7-10pm Sun 12N-2.30pm

Nearby Landmarks

Braywick Golf Club 1km

Maidenhead Golf Club 1km

Details

Telephone: 01628 620691

Website:

Cuisine: French

Private Dining: 12

8.5

Food & Drink: 8.2

Service: 8.9

Atmosphere: 8.9

Value: 7.1

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 4.0

Paul A. platinum reviewer 21 May 2018

In a way it is almost like stepping back into the old world of classic French dining with an atmosphere and service to match when you treat yourself to dinner at The Waterside with its super riverside setting. At first glance the menu appears familiar and conventional, but in fact a good deal of updating has taken place in the presentation and the combination of ingredients, as exemplified by the introductory plates, which were far from simple canapés: goat’s cheese and asparagus mousse with Campari and grapefruit jelly and salmon roe, followed by olive palmiers, an outstanding hot smoked eel and apple mousse, and a jokey ‘pork pie’. The assembly of flaked crab influenced by the effect of a ginger scented cucumber jelly and oscietra caviar showed how standards can be upheld, and a second inspired entrée mixed and matched foie gras, capers, bean sprouts and terrific caramelised orange - à la grenobloise maybe but entirely modern. The fish dish was probably the standout for us - superb turbot with a hint of marjoram and its beurre noisette, parsley sauce, swede and root vegetables, excellent morels, and an exemplary vin jaune. The pigeon breast main course took things down a peg for us as it seemed rather underseasoned, although it has to be said that the sauce diable was devilishly good, as was the barbajuan with the bird. A basil sorbet with mango espuma led us into the first dessert - delicious cannelé with hazelnut praline and citron vert at its centre. A good old soufflé, rhubarb this time, enhanced with raspberries, finished things off, a perfect example properly coming away from the sides of the dish without collapsing and literally melting in the mouth. With a wine flight of high quality, we can only say that for once a three star rating is deserved.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 5.0

Paul A. platinum reviewer 14 November 2016

The dining room seemed more modern and welcoming, and we were happy to find ourselves at a table with a good view of the river without being right next to the window. The staff seemed brighter and more professional than on our previous visit, and all was set for a three-star meal. Our tasting menu was indeed the epitome of classical French cuisine with apposite modern touches and it was accompanied by a wine flight of suitable quality. Three lovely teasers comprising delicate lobster with marie-rose sauce, wonderful venison tartare on potato and whipped goat’s cheese on the signature light-as-a-feather sablé preceded the amuse bouche proper, a trompette de la mort omelette with spinach, hazelnuts, lamb’s lettuce in a spectacular dressing, parmesan crisp and pear slices - a dish that was relatively small in quantity but big on flavour. Then came one of the best plates of the evening, a salad with a very decent portion of delicious native lobster, a very up-to-date beetroot gel, rocket leaves and crème fraiche seasoned with ossetra caviar, the different elements each making for a terrific balance of flavour. Another masterpiece followed, pheasant velouté with super diced foie gras and sweetcorn, the taste sensations being finished off with some confit pheasant for a worthy tribute to the game season. Something of a sense of humour in the kitchen then manifested itself, although perhaps Fabrice Uhryn, the head chef, was paying homage to his homeland with a classy variation on fish and chips in the form of turbot à la meunière with cheeky deep-fried croutons and green beans, almonds and a grape emulsion. We stayed with the more obviously game choice for the main course, which was an absolute picture - roasted loin of venison in a pastry crust, aka venison Wellington, broccoli florets, wild mushrooms, a fabulous Hermitage sauce with blackcurrant vinegar, and last but certainly not least a taste and texture contrast with chicken mousse in pastry as a sort of lieutenant to Wellington. The intermediate dish, a cider granita with fig mousse and orange, did the job perfectly as an introduction to the first dessert which provided a good texture contrast, the creamy yoghurt, fresh and slightly tart raspberries, lime marshmallow and yoghurt ice cream bouncing off each other then melding beautifully on the palate. The meal was completed with a mirabelle soufflé, quite nice but perhaps the least convincing of the barrage of taste bombs. As usual the petits fours were first-class, and amidst the welter of three-star criticism it was clear that The Waterside stands above it all.

Food & Drink: 3.0

Service: 2.0

Atmosphere: 3.0

Value: 3.0

Paul A. platinum reviewer 30 November 2015

In a three-star restaurant you would expect perfection in every respect, and this had been our experience on previous visits to The Waterside. Unfortunately this evening did not come up to our high expectations and we found ourselves questioning the various elements that contributed to this feeling of disappointment. Was it the fact that we were seated in the narrower part of the room just opposite the point of service where all the dishes were brought in from the kitchen and where we were aware of some of the numerous junior staff being too obviously instructed and corrected? Was it because some of the staff seemed less at ease and lacked any ability to communicate with the diners? Had the usually impeccable Diego failed to do his homework when he failed to acknowledge our return visit, something he did without fail before? Had we had occasion before to criticise any dish on the Menu Exceptionnel or wonder about the comparative quality of the wine flight which accompanied it? The meal started off well enough with lovely canapés, comprising caramelised pork belly pieces, a surprisingly successful match of salmon and beetroot in a smooth mousse, and whipped goat's cheese on beautifully light sablé. These were followed by what seemed to be almost a pre-entrée special with a very successful roquefort, artichoke, pear jelly and frisée combination. The first dish proper was a bit of a puzzle - ceviche of seabass and sliced octopus in a passion fruit jus, the latter far too strong for the fish but not the octopus, together with an ordinary green salad and some surprisingly large and crunchy grains of salt which also affected the overall taste. Definitely ho-hum. We were amused to find that we had enjoyed a very similar dish to the next course in a hotel in the Cotswolds just a few weeks before and we had to admit that this was even better - an epic warm escalope of foie gras with amazing gingerbread, quince compote and mulled wine sauce. Pike often gets bad reviews, but we have been in favour of it ever since we had it as the signature dish in a Paris restaurant, and this perfect soft and tasty quenelle was served with some brilliant langoustine tails which had us smiling with pleasure. There was a choice to be made for the main course and we opted for the "duo of seasonal game", basically a partridge breast rolled and wrapped in a thick coating of partridge mince along with soft and tasty venison, a mushtoom and spinach parcel, some hispi and a poivrade; however, the standout element of this dish was a superb pumpkin subric, which begged the question should the minor outshine the major? Our palates were then properly cleansed by a magic match of tequila and lime sorbet with raspberries, which set us up for first dessert of coconut meringue with pineapple and a pomegranate sorbet and mint leaf. For me the pineapple overpowered the coconut but the sorbet was good. We finished on a better note, though, the warm orange soufflé with firm strips of orange peel and properly slightly sharp lingonberries being a classic. While the balance of overall appreciation was then tilted back again towards good by the top-class petits fours, the number of question marks meant that we were less impressed than on previous occasions.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 5.0

Paul A. platinum reviewer 15 December 2014

What can one say about this amazing place that has not been noted before. The whole experience is near-on perfect - everything is polished and professional, the staff confident and relaxed and able to interact perfectly with the diners, the setting marvellous even in the winter, the food nothing less than exceptional, the wine flight dripping with class and expertly served and commented by Maxime the sommelier, and, the icing on the cake, a long chat with the immensely modest and charming Alain Roux. While it was natural to select the menu exceptionnel, we were surprised to see dishes listed that looked similar to those we had enjoyed in September last year, what was on the plate, though, was quite different. Interestingly, the three canapés, delicate cod tempura on a fresh pea base, subtle foie gras paté, and gruyère goujons, were not served to us, we were allowed to take what we wanted, almost as if some diners were likely to make the mistake of leaving one of these superb mouthfuls for someone else. Our amuse-bouche of smooth, fine-tasting boudin noir in a Calvados jus served with apple was a lovely classic taste combination which set up the palate for the following dish to perfection. The menu proper then started with a ceviche of sea bass and octopus marinated in a slightly citric passion fruit juice and matched with a crunchy salad - almost too simple sounding but oh so delicious. A signature dish followed, escalope of first-class foie gras with a slice of brilliant ginger bread, a mulled wine sauce, apple and quince compote and a mini pak choi. This was a complete and utter wow dish, and we stayed on our high when the next dish came - a very generous pan-fried medallion of excellent, tender, tasty lobster with a white Port sauce and a mind-blowing ginger vegetable julienne. What we had had up to this point left us musing on how often we would be obliged to dine here if we lived within easy striking distance of Bray. We both opted for the seasonal game rather than duck as our main, and the good, strong partridge was a great partner for the excellent venison, but the star turn here was the sensational pumpkin subric, backed up by a brussels purée and magic wild mushrooms. From previous experience we knew that the desserts were likely to provide a distinguished finale, and, sure enough, the palate cleanser was good enough to be the main dessert in some other restaurants, a raspberry cream with Tequila set against a lime sorbet did both jobs more than adequately. First of the two desserts proper was a picturesque teardrop of real milk chocolate, not a trace of vegetable oil, with filling of mango and a gesture of passion fruit, yet another winner. Soufflés are notoriously difficult to serve exactly right to the second, but this scrumptious example with its scent of orange, orange peel and lingonberries was without question one of the best ever. There was also a super selection of mignardises with coffee, our favourites being a seasonal mince pie with impeccable pastry, and an incredibly light palmier. The sheer pleasure of the evening was immeasurable.

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 5.0

BoatLady platinum reviewer 23 June 2014

I wasn't really looking forward to lunch at The Waterside Inn as my husband and I were in the middle of a war of attrition and we had got to the silent recrimination stage. I didn't have the enthusiasm to read further than the first page of the extensive menu and so we went for the set lunch and decided to choose wines separately to go with each course. A G&T in the cosy ante-room with some delicious amuse-bouche morsels and the freeze began to thaw. The meal that followed was stunning: a foie gras/chicken terrine consisted (unusually!) of more of the former than the latter with a sauce that perfectly cut through the slab of creamy richness, the only disappointment being the sauternes jelly which could have had more oomph; my lamb was light and tender but still substantial; my dessert had one small element which outshone everything else- an incredible sweet but sour green apple sorbet, surely the work of a culinary magician balancing those sophisticated Tangfastic flavours. Our sommelier chose a beautiful (and fairly priced) Gewurtz carafe to substitute for the out-of-stock house Riesling; patiently suggested a Paulliac (which matched my meat better) when I couldn't spot a Pinot Noir; and finally chose a fresh, light dessert wine more suited to my dessert than the Tokaji style I'd normally pick. He was charming, personal, approachable and typical of the fantastic (but not fawning) service in general; case in point, one waiter teasingly commented within the sommelier's earshot we “shouldn't trust the Italian selling French wine”! Love the banter. The dining room itself is a bit odd: it feels like an 80s conference room in conservatory but you can't help admire the riverside setting and the atmosphere still buzzes anyway. At £110 a head it was astonishingly good value but more importantly by the end, thanks to the food, drink and staff, my husband and I had re-established friendly relations, and you can't put a price on that.

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 2.0

London Gourmet platinum reviewer 28 January 2013

I couldn't help but felt a bit of let-down with this place. The setting on the river bank couldn't be more beautiful (and they have some lovely rooms and suites there as well – pricey but absolutely lovely), service being great and the food not to be faulted (just to be clear). My issue was that all the food was perfectly cooked but neither inspiring or “earth-shaking” – that might sound cruel but than again you don't go to a place like this for just a lunch or dinner but do expect something special

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 3.0

Mark bronze reviewer 21 August 2012

We are off to the Waterside Inn at Bray and thank God for satellite navigation systems. You punch in a postcode and hey presto, it guides you to your destination without any fuss or blazing rows over some inadequate map reading and it even bleeps a warning system if you come near one of those nasty speed cameras. However, following my experience in high end dining, I have an idea for satellite systems! They should also contain a new warning system, one that warns against pending enormous expense. Maybe instead of the voice announcing, "turn around where possible , it should say Bleep, Bleep “Unless you are travelling with your bank manager turn around bloody quick!” Bray itself has been called a foodie heaven whereas others say this sleepy village has the ability to break any man or women financially in a matter of hours. Maybe the local Bray Village Council should erect a sign, which instead of suggesting you slow down and abide the 30mph speed limit, should state “Beware – Serious risk of poverty”. We have been told the 3 star Waterside Inn now open for an impressive 40 years is expensive so our little piggy banks lay in pieces on the floor at home and we come with bulging wallets. The satnav leads us down a pretty lane with picture card cottages and at the end of the lane, we find a charming looking restaurant full of character and sitting right by the river. We are welcomed by the smart and friendly doorman and met with a smile from Maître Diego Masciaga whose genuine charm will warm any diner. He offers his hand to welcome us and we offer ours back, but still clinging with the other to our wallets like two school children gripping their mothers hands on the first day of school. We know we will have to surrender them up at some point, but for the moment we are still flush. The weather is fine so we are led onto the terrace where we enjoy two glasses of very expensive Champagne before dinner and admire the passing boats with their well-heeled occupants who all seem to know the staff and wave and shout various greetings. We love this perfect setting which reminds us of a Miss Marple murder mystery film set and how very English it feels. Those in the know, organise a short trip along the river on the restaurant's own boat and enjoy their champagne chugging along the water. We are given our own tray of exquisite and very tasty hors d oeuvres and settle down to watch the smartly dressed diners as they arrive, many it seems are on first names terms with the staff and some looking like film stars themselves, but I am pleased there is no stuffiness here which is all too common in some fine dining restaurants. Again, credit to Diego as I fear without him, things could take a more serious note. In fact the whole process of arriving, taking pre dinner drinks on the terrace and siting for dinner is extremely well practiced and works like clockwork. Staff and there are many, are just a tiny bit too attentive and as there are so many, you struggle to get any relationship going with anyone in particular. We did feel our wine waiter was a nudge away from being too pushy with the 1000 odd wines this restaurant stocks and was intent on making sure we finished our bottle of Sancerre before our mains arrived, so he could then offer some suggestions on a red wine. If we come again, we would be ready to nudge him away and nip that in the bud immediately. So after a scan of the delightful menu, we both opt for the tasting menu aptly named “Le menu exceptionnel”. Needless to say, the food is quiet exceptional and my hand picked Devon crab with a marinated prawn, melon and fresh almonds is a real stand out dish. Service was slightly rushed to begin with and a request to the waiter that we wanted to be given 15 minutes before our mains led to a raised eyebrow and “I will have to check with the chef” comment. We were given a 15 minute break, so thank you and I guess my slightly over duck was a consequence of this request. The food served here is very French and traditional in presentation, although I convinced that with Alain Roux's ability he could adopt more modern approach if he wished to. I personally now favour more lighter dishes then I did some years ago and many younger diners are finding their love of food from a city awash with establishments that serve food in tapas and sushi size portions. The foie gras with chicken breast was lovely, but uninspiring for me and just lacked something vibrant and with more texture than the crisp vegetable salad served with it. Again with my duck breast, I felt it just needed a lighter touch and fresher presentation. With the word French in mind, the dishes are what you expect and who am I to comment otherwise, but I would like to see some of these dishes given a modern touch. I am sure their loyal customers would be happy to give some feedback and this may help in the transition which is no doubt enviable at some stage. We finish our coffees with treats back on the terrace and reflect on the evening. This is truly one of the best restaurants this Country has, not because of the great food, but the whole ambience and character of the place leaves you feeling very content. We look at each other and both say “We have reached our destination!” We head outside clutching our wallets. They are now empty, limp, skinny affairs and I am hope the few coins remaining will be enough for the bus fare home, but for the moment, who cares! Le restaurant exceptionnel!

Food & Drink: 1.0

Service: 2.0

Atmosphere: 3.0

Value: 2.0

benn s. 17 September 2011

Dined 11/8/11. Well hopes were high. Personally I was shaking with anticipation, we had previously been to Le Gavroche but this was the mecca of the Roux dynasty. We were a bit early for our table, so the staff put us in a side room and simply left us there. After 10 minutes I went to the reception and asked for menus and then ordered 2 coffees. When the waiter returned he took our order. I was having veal which then sparked a lengthy explanation of how it would be cooked the french way ‘pink’, I felt this was slightly patronising but I played along and saying that this was the way I liked it. By now the time of our booking had well past and we were left there again. Eventually I went and asked to be seated…all the wrong way round. On to the meal. It was the first time my wife had eaten lobster and her response after was ‘is lobster supposed to be chewy?’ What a shame for such a sublime ingredient. Our main courses were steak (ordered rare) and veal. Both were over cooked, not a little bit but by a country mile. During the meal I stopped a waiter and asked for another glass of champagne, he simply did not understand the request. I asked him 3 more times with ever increasing simplicity but to no avail, in fact he did not say one word throughout. The wine that the sommelier ordered for us was fantastic and resonably priced, I was willing to pay alot more. I wanted to have the ‘selection of 6 desserts’ that were offered on the menu because I was finally going to taste a Roux dessert, 6 in fact. They were awful and tasteless. One even had white bread rolled thinly as a base and that is what it tasted like..odd. I got no prob paying £100's for meals but £24 for 2 black coffees, come on!!! It was as if 1st year catering students had taken over the kitchen and there was no lecturer present. It was best summed up by my wife when she said it was as if another couple had ordered the exact same meal 3 hours earlier and had not eaten it, so it had been left to one side and then we came in and they just served it straight up. To say it was a disappointment does not go anywhere near to covering it. The boys at the Fat Duck must be laughing their socks off as they see the Waterside chefs tramping past to start a shift…nothing to fear from that lot then.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 5.0

Barry M. 30 April 2011

The ULTIMATE in cooking and service in Great Britain…a temple of excellence not to be missed I’ve been visiting Waterside Inn with my family for around twenty years however I’ve only very recently started posting on Tripadviser and this is my first ever post on the internet about Waterside Inn, which has been consistently excellent …unlike most well-known restaurants we visit. Waterside Inn never disappoints. I used to enjoy and be a great fan of Gordon Ramsey in his younger, Aubergine days but I found his restaurant quality evaporated the more famous he became. I now avoid all of his restaurants. For fantastic food and service, we either go abroad…or in the UK we visit the true temple of culinary perfection, Waterside Inn, where we can both relax and be spoiled by their level of excellence…and avoid chef’s who cook with nitrogen and test-tubes…not our thing! Back in the 1970’s my favourite restaurant in the world was Alain Chapel, in Mionnay, near Lyon in France, with three Michelin stars. I’m very lucky…I’ve spent years visiting Michelin establishments and so I can speak from some experience. Waterside Inn is the 2011 equivalent of the late Alain Chapel and indeed Waterside’s Maitre d’, Diego reminds me of Herve Duronzier, the legendary Maitre D’ at Alain Chapel in being absolutely fantastic in every way. Chatting to Diego about the menu prior to ordering is an absolute must and at times the result may be quite a surprise. On one previous visit, Diego explained that Waterside Inn were one of only two restaurants in the world that served Duck Presse. We asked if we could try it. What a superlative experience…it was real theatre, different, delicious, interesting… and we look forward to doing it all again one day. I’m posting a photo of Diego beside Waterside Inn’s gleaming Duck Presse machine. Sophisticated diners need to experience this most spectacular recipe of the classical French repertoire, made famous by the Tour d'Argent, the oldest restaurant in France, at least once in a lifetime. In over 20 years I’ve only been served wonderful food at Waterside Inn and Diego is the most knowledgeable restaurant manager I have ever encountered and who always ensures guests are served what they want, irrespective of what is stated on the menu. Assistant Maitre D’, Freddy is also absolutely superb as are the sommeliers. The talented chef, Mr Alain Roux (son of founder, the legendary Michelle Roux) always appears to greet customers towards the end of service. We find him to be the most modest of chefs…he doesn’t need to tell everyone how brilliant his cooking is…it’s obvious. No TV super-chef rubbish for him. There’s something to be said to sticking to being a top chef, when you are a top chef. Last year the Dorchester Group opened Cowarth Park close to where we live. We tried their two rosette chef’s “tasting menu” which, had we not double ordered two of the courses, would have left my wife and guests hungry. With Waterside Inn nearby, I don’t see the point of returning to Coworth Park. We recently tried Waterside Inn’s new tasting menu along with some A La Carte dishes and a few specials which superb restaurant director and Maitre d’ Diego Masciaga suggested. Everything was impeccable and flowed with perfection… In fact we left all the decisions to Diego. After canapés, my wife and I both started with a freebie being a smooth parmesan cream with truffle and pink fir apple potato, served with almond pastry straw. Next came a Courgette flower filled with wild mushrooms, spring vegetables tossed in a warm olive oil with chopped truffle…incredible flavours from perfect ingredients. The kitchen then brought brought my wife a wonderful cheese soufflé while I enjoyed Pan-fried escalopes of foie gras Grenoble style with caramelized slices of orange…this unusually served with some bean sprouts, something I’ve never experienced with foie gras before…excellent. (on our previous visit, while I enjoyed escalope of foie gras with cardamam, glazed root vegetables, verjuice and sultana sauce…terrific, my wife who can’t deal with escalope of foie gras, had seasonal game pate wrapped in pastry with truffles and a pate of foie gras which she told me was incredible). Next item on the tasting menu was pan-fried lobster medallion with a white port sauce and ginger flavoured vegetable Julienne, which I’m sure anyone would enjoy…but as we don’t ever eat crustacea, Diego substituted with perfectly roasted, moist Turbot, on the bone served with soft tarbais beans and lardons, black trumpet mushrooms and a full flavoured Hermitage wine sauce. This was followed by “duo of seasonal game” with a pumpkin subric, parcel of wild mushrooms and spinach and poivrade sauce. This was a very substantial course indeed, more than equal in volume to Coworth Park’s entire tasting menu…and some! A partridge and a pheasant arrived which were then prepared at the table by Diego and an assistant and served to us together with venison. Wonderful taste, perfectly cooked. While we enjoyed this, my adventurous eight year old son, explained to Diego exactly how to filet a whole Dover sole (he is genuinely interested in cooking and can actually do this himself) while he was served roasted Challandais duck, with slices of poached quine, soft polenta with chestnuts and cider flavoured sauce (unusually for a child, he will try anything from any Michelin rated menu, although his favourites are pigeon, rabbit, anything to do with artichokes and soufflés). Pudding was a teardrop of milk chocolate mousse flavoured with caramel, mango and passion fruit filling and this was followed by a sensational warm date soufflé flavoured with cognac. We could barely manage the mignardises which followed…there was no tummy room left for the usual cappuccino with Baileys. I missed the selection of deserts from the summer menu (all truly “historic”) but I guess some of it isn’t in season. On our last visit to Waterside Inn, we enjoyed the best cooking anywhere since our previous Waterside visit…the service and cooking is just so superior to anywhere else we have visited in the UK and yet the cost of their tasting menu is no more than that of many lesser restaurants. Our most recent dinner must have been ten times better than any of the London restaurants that my wife and I visit…it may not have “buzz” of Scotts/Wolsely but nor does it have the high noise level. For the best food in the UK, Waterside Inn still remains supreme…in our humble opinion. When I want fantastic value and top quality perfection in every way, that is where I go and I create my own entertainment with my choice of guests. It’s where HM the Queen goes (as well as The Ritz of course). When I want a great buzz and a fun experience then we may go to the Wolseley and accept what I’m served without complaint or be squashed in at Scotts (I could barely move, I was so hemmed in on my last visit)…but I’ll still keep returning to them both. However when I want to be spoiled, or for a special occasion or to celebrate…then we go to Waterside Inn. There are some wonderful new bedrooms at Waterside Inn, we stayed a couple of years ago with our three children, even though we live only a few miles away…it was a special celebration. I would highly recommend the accommodation. During summer it is one of life’s great pleasures to enjoy pre-dinner canapés and drinks on the terrace, over-looking the river. The people watching is can also be quite interesting…all in all, unbeatable in the UK.

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 3.0

Mitzie8cake platinum reviewer 17 March 2011

In a word; sublime. Everything, from the moment you drive up to the quaint close and exit your vehicle for it to be valet parked by a flat capped gentleman, to the moment you leave feeling like you've tasted a slice of the ‘high life’, is sublime. Service, atmosphere and most importantly the food all deliver and Diego's men work with precision and panache, not an easy feat when you've a roomful of diners expecting nothing but the best. The bill at the end does leave you feeling somewhat high and dry but then you very quickly remember the accurate and effortless table theatre, that was the deconstruction of a whole Cornish lobster fresh out of the kitchen and on to a dressed plate in a mere five mins. Or you could cast your mind back to the delicious mango and chocolate dessert that filled your mouth with surprise and your heart with glee. Or it might be the fact that you only have to look up from your table and away from the beautiful vista that is the Thames, and a waiter is at your table in seconds. If you like Sublime. You've found your perfect meal.