Itsu Notting Hill

100 Notting Hill Gate , London, W11 3QA

  • Itsu
  • Itsu
  • Itsu

SquareMeal Review of Itsu Notting Hill

An instantly recognisable yellow and pink butterfly now flies above some 35 branches of Itsu, both takeout shops and swish flagship restaurants. The links in the chain (founded by Julian ‘Pret a Manger’ Metcalfe) vary in size and promise, but all share the brand’s ‘health and happiness’ ethos – a philosophy that translates into light, fresh and fashionable Japanese-inspired sushi, soups and salads served with some style. For a quick lunch, try a sandwich-salad hybrid or one of the ‘grab and go’ bento boxes; otherwise simply snack on wasabi popcorn and dark chocolate rice cakes. From the conveyor belt – Itsu was a kaiten pioneer in the UK – go for colour-coded plates such as tataki beef salad or ‘new style’ salmon sashimi. Exotic cocktails including kiwimanjaro and lychee martini have the edge on the to-the-point drinks list.

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Nearby Tube/Rail Stations

Notting Hill Gate Tube Station 109m

Holland Park Tube Station 623m

Address

Address: 100 Notting Hill Gate , London W11 3QA

Area: Notting Hill Holland Park

Opening times

Mon-Sun 12-11pm Sun -10pm

Nearby Landmarks

The Coronet Cinema Notting Hill Gate 63m

Gate Theatre 102m

Details

Telephone: 020 7229 4016

Website:

Cuisine: Japanese

7.0

Food & Drink: 8.0

Service: 6.0

Atmosphere: 7.0

Value: 7.0

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 3.0

Atmosphere: 3.0

Value: 3.0

Jessica S. 23 November 2010

My husband and I were intrigued to watch the huge Itsu on Notting Hill Gate take shape over the winter months, and so it was with some excitement that we went almost as soon as it opened. Set over two floors, its ambitious scale belies its laid back atmosphere, as does its glamorous, high octane decor. The designers of this impressive space have managed to create a cool, clubbish vibe which provides a stunning backdrop to the dining experience rather than competing with it. Not easily achieved. The ground floor is home to three enormous conveyor belts with well-priced. well-judged and delicious Itsu classics. Fresh and sparky, the seafood is partnered with a variety of interesting sauces and marinades which add drama and depth not usually found in the world of conveyor belt sushi. Special mention should go to the crab crystal roll, dreamily fresh and taken to new levels by a vibrant green-herb sauce and the yellow tail “new style”, hot with chilli and beautifully seasoned. From the hot menu, we tried tiger prawn tempura – light and delicious – and langoustine gyozas in “dynamite” broth – good gyozas, brilliantly flavoured broth, alive with lemongrass and a surprising but delicious note of aniseed. Above, the huge bar is set out in distinct zones, with large booths, delicate velvet chairs and space to mingle. Clever “cake stands” allow drinkers to become diners by helping themselves to dishes from the conveyor belt and stacking them, a great idea which had quickly caught on. No doubt this place will be heaving at the weekends but on the Thursday we visited it was well populated but not packed. When it opened, Itsu managed to build on the concept of the conveyor belt restaurant in excellent style. The same trick has been pulled off here, the Itsu concept itself refined and raised a few notches. We'll be back very. very soon. Note 23.11.2010: I have edited my original scores for this place to reflect the poor service we have experienced here. On 2 occasions now the conveyor belts have been turned off despite us and other diners being only halfway through dinner! When we complained the waitress bought a selection of food to our table, but that is hardly the point. I suspect that this policy is down to the restaurant being only half full most of the time – the much anticipated crowds have never materialised and the ambitious first floor is completely empty – but I would suggest that penalising those of us who do choose to go is a flawed tactic. We still eat here from time to time as the food remains fresh and delicious, but my (considerable) enthusiasm has definitely waned!