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21 August 2014
(menu)

Fera at Claridge'sone star

020 3551 2823

Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR

£115.00 British Mayfair, Oxford Street

Overall Diner Rating

 

Based on 8 ratings. Rate it!

  • Wine: £29.00
  • Champagne: £68.00
  • Lunch: £35/45 (2/3 courses)
  • Dinner: £85/95/125 (3/6/10 courses)
  • Opening Hours: Mon-Sun 12N-2.30pm 6.30-10pm

Square Meal Review of Fera at Claridge's ?

With the launch of Fera, Londoners have their first chance to sample Simon Rogan’s food since his extended pop-up Roganic closed. The name means ‘wild’ in Latin, and the man himself has said that the restaurant contains the DNA of his two-Michelin-starred L'Enclume in Cartmel, while being respectful of Claridge’s heritage: what was formerly Gordon Ramsay’s domain remains a grand art-deco space of ocean-liner proportions, but the new walnut tables are bare, and the combination of green leather seating and stone and slate crockery references Rogan’s earthy, farming-and-foraging approach to things. Memorable flavour hits are many and thrilling: a dense whip of potato and Winslade cheese studded with springy diced duck heart; garden-fresh pea wafers with fennel and flowers; a dish of stewed rabbit frilled with crisp ribbons of batter; and a grilled salad involving Isle of Mull cheese, truffle custard and sunflower seeds. On the downside, we felt that flavours were not sustained as vividly as they are at L’Enclume, and the attentions of myriad staff (including chefs) was off-putting – first-week jitters, perhaps. Even so, Fera is dazzling confirmation of Rogan’s arrival in gastronomy’s international big league.

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  1. Fera at Claridge's

    Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR
    Overall rating:
     
    Deborah A.

    Flavours defying description

        (4)

     
    • Food & Drink: 10
    • Service: 8
    • Atmosphere: 6
    • Value: 5

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  2. Fera at Claridge's

    Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR
    Overall rating:
     
    James S.

    Perfection

        (1)

     
    • Food & Drink: 10
    • Service: 10
    • Atmosphere: 10
    • Value: 10

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  3. Fera at Claridge's

    Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR
    Overall rating:
     
    David H.

    We anticipated excellence and got it

      Gold Reviewer  (38)

     
    • Food & Drink: 9
    • Service: 8
    • Atmosphere: 9
    • Value: 8

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  4. Fera at Claridge's

    Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR
    Overall rating:
     
    Nicole G.

    Fera is not wild enough

        (13)
    Editor's pick

     
    • Food & Drink: 7
    • Service: 6
    • Atmosphere: 8
    • Value: 7

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  5. Fera at Claridge's

    Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR
    Overall rating:
     
    Fiona D.

    Excellent

        (2)

     
    • Food & Drink: 10
    • Service: 10
    • Atmosphere: 10
    • Value: 8

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  6. Fera at Claridge's

    Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR
    Overall rating:
     
    DL

    Dinner at Fera

        (1)
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful.

     
    • Food & Drink: 6
    • Service: 4
    • Atmosphere: 6
    • Value: 4

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  7. Fera at Claridge's

    Claridge's, Brook Street, London W1K 4HR
    Overall rating:
     
    Georgia D.

    Fera at Claridges

        (1)
    1 of 1 people found this review helpful.
    Editor's pick

     
    • Food & Drink: 9
    • Service: 10
    • Atmosphere: 7
    • Value: 7

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  1. Claridge’s is amongst the creme de la creme of London hotels. To have a flagship restaurant without a Michelin star is all rather awkward. Step-up Simon Rogan (aged 46), of the 2-starred L’Enclume fame, and henceforth came the “concept” of Fera, meaning wild in Latin. Over the years I have become somewhat jaded by tasting menus. Overly fussy and generally more expensive than a la carte, it more often than not left me with an upset stomach as my unprepared digestive system battled with all kinds of experimental cooking. I had been to one of Simon Rogan’s earlier London ventures Roganic, which left me unimpressed and exasperated by the increasingly unnecessary complication of cooking. Fera’s tasting menu was given a chance on the recommendation from a Scottish friend who will be referred to a “SC”...
    More from Life's Indulgences »

  2. Published : Tuesday, 12th August 2014

    Nomface :: Fera at Claridge

    Our meal of 2013 was undoubtedly at L’Enclume, the mothership of Simon Rogan’s empire. When we found out that he would be taking over the restaurant at Claridges and that the opening month coincided with my birthday there were no longer questions on choosing a venue. The restaurant opened in May and I have just summoned the courage to write up the blog post. I guess the sheer length of the menu and pictures has put me off until now. One thing I find annoying when reading other blog posts about Fera is that some people complain about the length of the tasting menu and describe them as sixteen courses. It irks me as I don’t really class the opening seven ‘snacks’ as courses, some are merely a bite and are served in quick succession. Since our visit I see that the tasting menu has been trimmed down slightly to thirteen items along with a price reduction from £120 to £105. I was lucky to book a table within the opening weeks and reservations were like gold dust in May, however during the current slow month of August it seems you can pretty much dictate a time and date from the online reservations. The interior entrance to Fera is quite understated and somewhat concealed as we walked straight past the subtle Fera signage and doorway without realising. The dining room is dominated by a tree in the centre and the décor is classy without needing the bling like the crystal chandeliers at The French, the Manchester restaurant of the Rogan group...
    More from Nomface »

  3. We had a wonderful meal at Simon Rogan's Roganic last year, and when it closed without any confirmation of a follow up London venture I was disappointed that we would not be able to sample his cooking again without a long journey up to Cumbria. So, to my delight, when Claridges announced he would be taking over the restaurant from Gordon Ramsay, I knew we would be heading for lunch as soon as we could.You can't help but feel a bit special when heading into Claridges, and as we arrived a little early we soaked up the ambiance in the lobby before heading in. The room is impressive, with Claridges stunning art deco architecture, but a natural, organic feel, with pebble stones on wooden tables with a comfortable ambiance.We were sat and Jack, joining Fera from our Fitzrovia haunt Kitchen Table, came over for a chat and took our drinks orders. Nice to see a familiar face. Throughout the meal the service from all was top class, just the type of consummate professionals I would expect at venue like Claridges, and not a hint of stuffiness.Starting with some cocktails, pea shoot, apple marigold and vermouth for my wife, and a lovage and herb rye whiskey for me.  Both were unusual, and quite different to anything I've had before, and as I'm a fan of lovage it was great to taste it in such a different way. However, note to self: Don't have whiskey cocktail instead of breakfast.The first dish was brought out by Simon himself, a rather impressive start. A crisp barley wafer with smoked eel, lovely, light and flavoursome. The canapes were all equally lovely, a mouthful of the sea in the form of a mackerel wafer, a fabulous bite of rabbit, crisp, warm and rich, and an absolute peach of a dish, a bowl with potato mousse and winslade cheese dish, including duck heart for myself, being particularly memorable. The last amuse bouche was clever, an almost ice cold salad of crab with rhubarb acting as a perfect palate cleanser before the bread course, a hunk of bread with butter and unusually a cup of sweet onion broth.The main dishes were all very much what I would expect from Simon, very light, bags of flavour, highly technical, unusual herbs and foraged ingredients. The cabbage/beef course had an amazing smoked broccoli cream I will remember for a long time but the star was a dish brought out by Simon himself, a grilled salad. This was amazing, a barrage of crunchy and crispy textures from the grilled leaves, underneath a gorgeous truffle custard redolent with strong truffle flavours served in a wooden bowl and with a large wooden spoon, which i used to scrape the bowl clean of every last trace of that custard. I've seen some of the opening reviews where some found they weren't so keen on some courses, but I couldn't fault a single dish, and every element from the shellfish butter with the prawn to some delightful discs of pickled tongue with the hogget an absolute treat.Desserts were similar, light, fresh with perfect balance. I loved the cherries that came with the yoghurt, and the celery pieces at the bottom of the ice cream dish were a touch of unexpected genius, I now know that if you do it right, celery can go in a dessert.  This was finished with a blackcurrant wafer and a fizzy blackberry concoction, which was excellent, and I think a much better choice than the chamomile milkshake I've seen described elsewhere.The petit fours were again something out of the ordinary, especially the sweet cicely cake, a ghost of a sponge so light it barely seemed real. We ended the meal with a fancy filter coffee poured at the table, in a rather cool Japanese filter kit, the coffee a fabulous Kenyan blend that we took without milk and clearly a cut above most coffees I've had.Our wine, recommended by the sommelier on my vague instructions for something sweet, fruity and fragrant was a bottle of Patrimonio ‘Grotte di Sole’, Antoine Arena 2010 (£75) and was perfect with the food, lasting us right to the petit fours.The bill came to around £420, our most expensive London meal, but with the surroundings, food, service, booze and a 15 quid (!) coffee it wasn't too much of a shocker. We enjoyed a memorable lunch, Simons food is exciting, unique and every bite a joy. Vegetarians are equally catered for, with Simons food naturally being more vegetarian friendly, especially with so much being sourced from the farm in Cartmel.Puffed barley, onion, watercress. Puffed barley, smoked eel, watercress.Berkswell cheese, pickled plum. Mackerel, seawater cream, caviar.Stewed rabbit and lovage.Chicken skin, thyme, roasted garlic.Scallops in buttermilk.Peas in buttermilk.Winslade and potato.Crab, rhubarb, goats cheese.Kohlrabi, rhubarb, goats cheese.Malt bread, onion broth.Raw beef, smoked broccoli cream, scallop roe, acidic apple juice.Sweetheart cabbage, smoked broccoli cream, fresh curd, acidic apple juice.Oxalis, smoked yolk, carrot, juniper.Prawns from Gairloch, picked alexander, asparagus, shellfish butter.Asparagus, picked alexander and sunflower.Grilled Salad, Isle of Mull, truffle custard and sunflower seeds.Cods cheeks poached in dulse stock, artichoke, beetroot and sea orache.Artichokes with dulse, beetroot and sea campion.Herdwick hogget, pickled tongue, mushroms, turnips.Celeriac baked in hay, crispy skin, hen of the woods, turnips and hazelnut.Chamomile, butterscotch, celery.Sheep's yoghurt, cherries, Douglas fir.Hampshire Strawberries,woodruff and elder flower.Blackberry and lemon verbena.Sweet cicely cake.Banana mint drops.Smoked meringue.Fera At Claridges
    More from Edesia Is Hungry - Food of the Gods »

  4. We do a lot of things that our ancestors would find regressively, inexplicably primitive. In the past (and right now in the developing world while we’re at it), living in a field without running water, electricity or plumbing would be considered poverty. In the modern West, we call it camping and subject our children to it. Foraging arguably falls into the same category – scouring the wilderness for ingredients may turn up the freshest greens, but it seems terribly inefficient and inconsistent to the layman observer. If chef Simon Rogan is best known for anything, other than having his Cumbrian restaurant L’Enclume appear in The Trip, then it’s for his dedication to foraging. While foraging isn’t explicitly stated to be in use at the kitchen of Fera at Claridge’s, his newest restaurant, the menu is allegedly all about seasonal ingredients. Then again, it’d be hard to find a restaurant in London that claims it isn’t about seasonality – it’s the latest fad...
    More from The Picky Glutton »

  5. Published : Sunday, 18th May 2014

    Lady Aga :: Fera at Claridge's

    Fera as in wild - like feral. It’s Latin and it’s also the latest dining installation at Claridges hotel from Simon Rogan who hails from, most notably, L’Enclume up in Cumbria; a two Michelin star establishment with a heavy focus on foraging and locality. I’ve never been, but I know people who have and they say it’s better than The Fat Duck. Wild is perhaps not an attribute you would necessarily align with Claridges hotel; one of London’s chicest hospitality destinations - all elegant sophistication and not in the least bit untamed. I might have felt a little vulnerable and prey-like having flung myself through the revolving doors into Claridges vast urban safari of Art Deco luxe and encountered a distinct lack of enthusiasm to show me to the dining room but, once you’ve located the red velvet curtains of Fera, it’s hospitality central. The staff are so charming and pitch-perfect in their reception it’s almost comical. It also helps that they all look, well, just so damned good! I particularly loved the girl’s uniforms of colourblock navy and black long sleeved shift dresses; a look that The Blonde summed up as ‘futuristic air hostess’...
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  6. Published : Tuesday, 13th May 2014

    Samphire and Salsify :: Fera at Claridge’s

    Fera at Claridge’s is the hotel’s brand spanking new restaurant by Simon Rogan – his first London venture since the very successful “pop-up” Roganic in Marylebone. Having eaten particularly well at L’enclume and The French, we were really excited to be trying his new place. Fera (which means ‘wild’ in Latin) has replaced the old Gordon Ramsay restaurant and what a transformation it is. The dining room is ever so handsome. It’s a very battleship grey affair with plush carpets, dark leather seating and beautiful sections of stained glass on the ceiling...
    More from Samphire and Salsify »

  7. Fera at Claridge’s is Simon Rogan’s 2014 London venture at what used to be Gordon Ramsay’s art deco dining room. Remodelled with a chic olive grey and silver colour scheme, this is without any doubt one of the most stylish dining rooms in London. The food served is equally beautiful too. This is partly achieved through the way Rogan sources and selects his ingredients. With the amount of greenery and flowers on show, he gives Columbia Road market a run for its money, though these impressive dishes are also a result of his meticulous, artistic style. But what about the food and its flavour? Strangely, Fera was a bit of a roller-coaster experience for us. Strange, because months and months of preparation would have gone into creating these menus. Successful influences would have been adopted from his **2 star l’Enclume and elsewhere. While some dishes were wonderful, others were just nice or even a bit flat. A shorter, punchier menu could have achieved a higher level of consistency with less work. That said, the wonderful things were outstanding, so the overall feeling we came away with was very, very good...
    More from vialaporte »

  8. It's finally here - the biggest and most anticipated opening of the year. The excitement hasn't been just contained to London, but globally. Renowned chef Simon Rogan was chosen by Claridges to take up residency at the hotel after a long stint with Gordon Ramsay - whose restaurant i visited about 10 years ago. If my memory serves me well, i loved it a lot, so the new restaurant Fera, had some big shoes to fill. Simon runs some of the UK's best restaurants, such as the famous L'Enclume and recently publicised The French in Manchester on TV's Restaurant Wars. Fera, which comes from the Latin word 'wild' was named so to reflects Simon's cooking utilising foraged and wild ingredients - all affected by the seasons and weather. The restaurant itself also deserves mention. Designed by Guy Oliver this art deco room is as opulent and stunning as its food, a perfect match. Cooling calm colours of pastel greens and ocean blue grey and a ceiling adorned with stained glass, it really is spectacular on the eye...
    More from londonfoodaholic »

  9. Published : Saturday, 10th May 2014

    Dancing In High Heels :: FERA AT CLARIDGES

    I have often walked past but have never stepped into Claridges before, so it was nice to finally see what laid within the legendary walls of this Mayfair hotel.As we walked through the revolving doors, I instinctively walked straight up to the reception at The Foyer, but was then approached by Restaurant Director, Ben Hofer, who led us down the other side of the hall to the entrance to Fera. The latest venture from Michelin-starred chef Simon Rogan, the name Fera comes from the Latin word 'wild', which reflects the use of seasonal ingredients and the influence of nature in his style of British cooking. Warmly greeted by the reception staff, we were seated along the sofas with a nice view of the glamorous room. I really liked the centrepiece, with the lighting giving it a dramatic setting. | Pea wafer, fennel and flowers |Or first little snack was served to us by chef Simon Rogan himself - so pretty and colourful, I was reluctant to eat it. Delightfully smooth and creamy and really light and crunchy wafer.| Stewed rabbit with lovage |Crispy on the outside, and moist and tender on the inside. | Mackerel, caviar, seawater cream || Winslade, potato, duck heart |I don't think I've ever eaten duck heart, and only just realized what I had eaten after having a glance at the menu. I was probably too distracted by the food that I must have missed out some bits of the explanations by the waiter - typical me.I swiftly cleaned up my bowl and found it very appetizing - sometimes it's best not to know what you're eating and just enjoy the moment. I suppose I won't feel as queasy now about eating hearts, now that I have actually tasted it and surprisingly liked it.  The bread was served with bone marrow butter and a warm cup of mushroom broth.  | Raw beef, smoked broccoli cream, scallop roe, acidic apple juice |Having a great love for tartare and raw dishes, this was naturally up my street. Unfortunately I hadn't realized that my dining partner was not a fan of raw beef. Hence, being a good friend, I willingly volunteered to eat his share as well - can't let good food go to waste! | Prawns from Gairloch, prime pork fat, borage and chicory |Amazingly fresh and juicy prawns, and again very pleasing to the eye. | Brill cooked in whey flavoured with hogweed, Jerseys, blewits and beach herbs |The brill was cooked perfectly, as well as the little Jersey potatoes. Sauce was nice without overpowering the flavours of the fish.Absolutely brill-iant.Pardon the pun, I just couldn't help myself... | Middle white pork, caramelised leek broad bean and mead reduction |Another faultless dish, and that mead reduction had me wanting more... | Baked yoghurt, pear poached in perry, mint and muscovado | I have a real weakness for good desserts, and this has got to be my favourite dish of the meal. Sweet and refreshingly cooling. I was tempted to do an Oliver Twist impersonation - 'Please sir, I want some more...' | Iced beech leaf, nitro sweet cheese, apple and sorrel |Another deliciously refreshing dessert. One of my five-a-day, sorted. | Chamomile milkshake, chocolate malt | Chocolate malt hidden underneath...sneaky! And to finish off our meal, more little snacks to nibble on.    Overall a very pleasant experience - impressively good food and very hospitable staff.An elegant room with a touch of vintage and contemporary chic. Did I also mention that they have a really beautifully designed back wall - something to keep in mind for my future dream house! Unfortunately I forgot to bring my scrapbook diary with me today, but I did take the menu to add to my little book of memories... - I promise I will bring it in next time, Ben :)Address: 49 Brook St., London W1K 4HRTel. No.: 0207 7107 8888Opening hours: 12:00-14:30 (lunch) ; 18:30-22:00 (dinner)The Cheekster, signing out x
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