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23 August 2014
(menu)

Augustine Kitchen

63 Battersea Bridge Road, London SW11 3AU

French Battersea, Clapham Junction

Overall Diner Rating

 

Based on 4 ratings. Rate it!

  • Opening Hours: Mon-Sun 12N-3pm 6-10.30pm

Square Meal Review of Augustine Kitchen ?

After 10 years as head chef at Covent Garden’s Mon Plaisir, Franck Raymond has moved across the river to set up shop just south of Battersea Bridge. The new venture is sure to win as many plaudits as his former establishment – particularly as it deals in the kind of honest, unshowy Gallic cooking that made his name, at prices suited to the neighbourhood location. Unremarkable interiors (white tablecloths, high-backed chairs and specials boards) set the scene for patriotic wines and a refined bourgeois menu served by attentive staff. Shelled snails in a creamy parsley and butter sauce or lobster soup spiked with Armagnac promise gutsy French flavours elevated by touches of finesse, while perfectly roasted cod with quinoa, orange and rosemary sauce is a standout main course. For afters, fluffy chocolate mousse is pure heaven. An instant local gem.

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  1. Augustine Kitchen

    63 Battersea Bridge Road, London SW11 3AU
    Overall rating:
     
    Simon F.

    Great French restaurant

        (1)

     
    • Food & Drink: 10
    • Service: 10
    • Atmosphere: 5
    • Value: 8

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  2. Augustine Kitchen

    63 Battersea Bridge Road, London SW11 3AU
    Overall rating:
     
    Robert Y.

    Enticing authentic French cooking at a great price.

        (1)
    Editor's pick

     
    • Food & Drink: 10
    • Service: 10
    • Atmosphere: 8
    • Value: 10

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  3. Augustine Kitchen

    63 Battersea Bridge Road, London SW11 3AU
    Overall rating:
     
    Alice B.

    I love it.

        (1)

     
    • Food & Drink: 10
    • Service: 8
    • Atmosphere: 6
    • Value: 10

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  1. So i had that rare opportunity recently of going back to a restaurant which i dined at last year, and said i wouldn't be returning too. Everything i ate last year looked clumsy on the plate, attention to detail was minimal and things just didn't leave me longing for them again. But something unprecedented has happened. Just take your time, visually to look at my review of Augustine Kitchen last year and you can noticeably see the improvements. The head chef and owner , Franck Raymond has certainly taken customer feedback to the max, because he's managed to turn what was just another French bistro restaurant in Battersea, to THE best French bistro in Battersea. From the moment i walked in to Augustine Kitchen again, something felt noticeably different. I'm not sure what, maybe it was the torrential rain outside which left us warm and cosy besides a bottle of Provence rose on our table. Maybe is was our waitress who was attentive yet unobtrusive. Or maybe i was yet again swooned over by the outstanding prices for this part of London. Who knows. Once we managed to gulp down some of that delicious cold rose, our first, of many starters arrived. A sublime duck terrine with a prune and ginger marmalade, a rich meatiness and great texture. There was so much flavour to it, with that marmalade adding a lovely coating of sweetness. We actually scraped the pot of marmalade dry - it was that good...
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  2. Published : Sunday, 12th January 2014

    The Swindian :: Review of Augustine Kitchen, Battersea

    Augustine Kitchen is located in Battersea, which I had never visited before, but really liked, particularly due to the gorgeous weather yesterday. My friend and I were treated like royalty, as the waitress gave us a table by the window, started us off with pink champagne (the key to my heart!) and then brought out Franck himself to explain just what he would be cooking. Let me talk you through the 5 courses, one by one, as they were presented. Try not to drool too much. The first course was lentil salad, with grapes, croutons and small pieces of cheese...
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  3. Published : Tuesday, 12th November 2013

    Sybaricious :: Augustine Kitchen, Battersea

    There is such a thing as damning with faint praise and our experience of Augustine Kitchen was the victim of such by A just minutes in to our main course when she said with a sigh and a disappointed frown; "oh but I had really wanted to like this place'. I couldn't have put it better myself. I had high hopes. Chef Franck Raymond crossed to the south of the river with a reputation cemented during his time at Mon Plaisir in Covent Garden and a Twitter feed had talked of excellent food and wine suppliers.At 7pm on a Saturday night we were the only diners in the main room. By 9pm it was a third full. At first we felt bad for them as I would love to see a really good neighbourhood restaurant succeed in this location and if you can't be busy on a Saturday night just weeks after a reasonably well publicised opening then when can you?  Nearby Buchans has been closed for years and other restaurants near Battersea Bridge seem to come and go like ghosts. "Oh please write them a lovely blog post" A commented looking around and I agreed. Unfortunately the mood had changed somewhat by half way through our main course.I started with a cassolette of snails with garlic and parsley butter. What arrived was a very thick, glutinous beige sauce with a strong garlic kick and some little black snails perched delicately on top. The sauce was really very tasty and I enjoyed the dish but it would have been nice to have felt that the snails had been poached in the sauce rather than being a last minute addition. The sauce also wasn't exactly what I would have described as a garlic and parsley butter but hey ho. A had a well executed duck terrine with a prune and ginger marmalade. The terrine was very meaty indeed. Magret of duck came with a pear poached in red wine and spices and chicon. No carbs on the plate and it was the weekend so a portion of chips was suggested to me and accepted (after all what fool says no to chips?)  The duck was well cooked and served pink but had a very strong flavour to it. I love duck as much as the next man but this had an overly gamey hint, like when a pheasant is hung until just before it rots off the hanging string.A had steak and chips, the steak being cooked well and meat of good quality (but its no Hawksmoor or Goodman). Perfectly acceptable though.The chips were, to say the least, a disappointment. Rifling through the two metal plant pot things that the chips were served in (are chips ever not served in metal plant pots now by the way?) we were unable to find a single chip that was longer than a 1.5cm. These really were the tiny, scrag end offcuts of a woeful excuse for a potato. Fried to within an inch of their life they were more like those little pointy, salty stick things you could buy for 8p a pack out of the vending machine after swimming lessons in the 80s. So we did the only sensible thing you could in such a situation and asked for a little pot of mayonnaise. The waiter left. A conference was held, the maitre d' returned. The response was that "We do not have mayonnaise............. and we wouldn't have ketchup either". OK no mayo, shame but no biggie, but hang on there, why the ketchup comment? What exactly was she getting at with the completely rude and utterly superfluous addition of  "... and we wouldn't have ketchup either" accompanied by a raised eyebrow and a scarlet lipped smirk?  I didn't ask for ketchup, I didn't mention ketchup, I wanted mayonnaise. Furthermore, would it really have been such a crime if I had asked for ketchup, after all they merrily serve steak and (substandard) chips so it would seem like a reasonable condiment to ask for. Or perhaps she thinks herself and her establishment as being above mayonnaise? There's no other word for it, its just downright bitchy. Being a bitch to your customers is perhaps not an ideal way to garner popularity or future custom, it should be rule 101 in the basic manual to running a restaurant.There seems to be a polar difference between self perception and reality in this place. You offer 2 course for £9.95 lunches and boast on Twitter about being the cheapest in the postcode but you're too good for customers who politely ask for mayonnaise? It may have been a condescending attempt to belittle me as a diner but I see it as more of a reflection on them and their over exalted view of their establishment. Ultimately you're a little neighbourhood brasserie on the Battersea Bridge Road surrounded by high rise council blocks. Get over yourselves. Oh and finish decorating the women's loo too.Despite the main course fail, I can never say no to tarte tatin. On the positive side this version was excellent. A classic French dessert executed to perfection. The apples were buttery and soft throughout held together with their caramel coating. Worth noting though that it was dish of the day so might not always be available. Dark chocolate mousse was less of a success, more milk chocolate with a central core of whipped cream topped with dark chocolate shavings and berries. Not bad but not excellent either and another case of not being what was described on the menu. So whilst some of the dishes are excellent, others are very hit and miss. Combine that with running the gamut of the maitre d's claw sharpening comments and I don't see any reason to return. Whilst another decent neighbourhood French would have been nice, I'd rather have a steak round the corner at Butcher & Grill or a burger at the Drafthouse, served with a smile and none of the attitude.4/10Augustine KitchenBattersea Bridge RoadLondon SW11
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  4. Battersea is an area which i really love, but it lacks very good restaurants - especially in the Battersea Bridge area. I was very excited when i heard a French restaurant had just opened just over the bridge from Chelsea, led by head chef, Franck Raymond who already worked wonders at Mon Plaisir in Covent Garden, with its authentic French food. Here, Franck is focusing on a menu led by ingredients from his home town, Evian. The dining room of Augustine Kitchen looks as though its been here for years and while it does have some charm to it...
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