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22 July 2014

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The Kipling Suite at Brown's

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Browns Hotel - 0807_Classic_Suite_at_Brown's_Hotel.jpgPerfect for the guest who wants to spend more time entertaining than sleeping, the Kipling Suite is all about the lounge. Located on the first floor, with enormous windows looking out over Albemarle Street, this is a grand, high-ceilinged space, adorned with beautiful artwork. You could easily host anything from interviews and business meets to private dinners or even cocktail parties here.

By comparison, the residential areas feel quite small – but there’s absolutely no skimping on luxuries. The bed comes topped with the most comfortable mattress we’ve ever slept on, while the bathroom fits a tub with built-in television, his & hers sinks and a walk-in rain shower, plus a generous scattering of Penhaligon’s toiletries. There is also a separate ‘front door’ in here, allowing partners free access to their room even when their other half is entertaining next door. 

The suite gets its name from famous author Rudyard Kipling, who often stayed at Brown’s Hotel and actually penned his most famous work, the much-loved Jungle Book, from this very room. It’s easy to see why he found the space so inspirational. With loads of natural daylight and a very sizeable desk, it even offers encouragement from one Sir Winston Churchill, who seems to be cheering you on from his desktop photograph.

Those wanting distraction can play with one of two B&O televisions or hook their iPod up to the remote-controlled Bose docking station before sinking into an armchair with a volume from the well-stocked bookshelf.


This article first appeared in Square Meal Venues & Events magazine, Autumn 2008.


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