Best London restaurants with private rooms for less than 10 people

Looking for a private room? Whatever occasion you’re celebrating, be it a birthday, working lunch or celebration dinner, we’ve got the private dining room to suit your needs. For groups big and small, from tucked-away private rooms to mezzanine levels offering you the buzz of the restaurant below, let us curate a unique private dining experience for your special occasion with our list of the best private dining rooms in London.

If you need help finding a venue, booking a private room in a restaurant contact the SquareMeal Concierge team.

Updated on 19 January 2018

Check out SquareMeal’s excellent selection of the best private dining rooms for less than 10 people. This extensive list covers all areas of London and features restaurants of all budgets and tastes, meaning that finding the right restaurant for your private party or meeting for fewer than 10 people is easy. Every one of the restaurants featured in SquareMeal’s list of the best private dining rooms for 10 people or less have been tried and tested by food critics and our own customers so check out the reviews and book a table online with SquareMeal today.

 

Ishtar

Ishtar

10-12 Crawford Street, London, London, W1U 6AZ

The inviting open frontage is a big advantage for this Turkish grill in the summer months, while the interior makes an equally bullish statement of intent: green walls, contemporary candelabra-style light fittings and a copper ceiling signal that this is no run-of-the-mill kebab joint. That said, the charcoal grill is a significant player, adding a smoky tinge to marinated aubergines, lamb chops or skewered minced chicken and peppers (curiously wrapped in a tortilla), but the kitchen also makes its point with rich flavours, slightly fussy presentation and a menu that runs from tabbouleh and falafel to poached octopus, braised lamb shank in tomato sauce and veggie moussaka. Set lunches and express menus are a big draw, while the drinks list includes a couple of Turkish wines. Handy if you’re looking for something posher than the ethnic eateries on nearby Edgware Road. 

£30 - £49
Turkish
Miyama City

Miyama City

17 Godliman Street, London, EC4V 5BD

With Toshiba’s UK headquarters nearby, it’s not surprising that this unreconstructed Japanese restaurant is popular with the local corporate crowd. Kimono-clad waitresses provide formal, ultra-polite service and the decor has hardly changed in nearly 30 years – so pull up a stool at the sushi counter or consider some theatrical, freshly sizzled teppanyaki prepared by knife-wielding chefs. For those who fancy something more elaborate, there’s a slightly-too-bright basement room where punters can work their way through soups, rice and noodle specialities, plus dishes such as chawan mushi (savoury egg custard), breaded pork tonkatsu, beef teriyaki or grilled sea bass fillet with salt. Bento boxes suit the lunchtime crowd and the sushi ‘happy hour’ brings nigiri from £1.50 a piece. To drink, check out the three-shot saké flights from a helpfully annotated drinks list.

£30 - £49
Sushi
Japanese
£30 - £49
Champor Champor

Champor Champor

62-64 Weston Street, London, SE1 3QJ

“Amazing“ Champor Champor delivers its creative take on Malaysian food against a “quirky” backdrop of incense-scented romance, with batik textiles and tribal artefacts adding exotic allure to the space – there’s even a table for two up in the mezzanine (“a good spot on date night”, notes a fan). Culinary ambition runs high here, with few classics left unmarked by the fusion brush – duck satay is served with almond-butter sauce and crispy lemongrass, spiced lamb fillet comes with sweet potato mascarpone and julienne of cucumber, while a king prawn curry is embellished with asparagus and butternut squash. You can still find beef rendang among the more innovative offerings on the “unusual but excellent menu” (along with a contingent of Thai dishes), although desserts return to crossover territory for the likes of tom yum brûlée or chocolate and chilli cheesecake. The eclectic list offers some interesting spice-friendly bottles at sympathetic prices.

Malaysian
Odette

Odette's

130 Regent's Park Road, London, NW1 8XL

Odette’s has been a fixture in Primrose Hill since the year north London boy Rod Stewart reached number one with ‘Da Ya Think I’m Sexy?’ That was 1978. Run since 2008 by Welsh chef-patron Bryn Williams, the place remains a shining northern star. It’s a place of balance. From coherent, smart decor to cooking that is satisfyingly modern, the enterprise is far, far more than a humble neighbourhood restaurant. Carte and tasting menus show what Bryn is all about – intelligent combinations, judicious sourcing (plenty of Welsh ingredients) and full-on flavours. Glazed pork cheek comes with apple and lobster bisque in a dynamite little surf & turf combo, with main-course loin of venison in the company of cavolo nero, celeriac and pear. There’s impressive technical skill on show, right up to dessert of lemon curd Arctic roll. The pretty little garden out back and fashionable kitchen table add to Odette’s broad appeal.

£30 - £49
Modern European
Defune

Defune

34 George Street, London, W1U 7DT

This oriental veteran claims to be the oldest Japanese restaurant in London, and it’s become renowned for offering standout traditional dishes in pleasingly approachable surrounds: relax in the tastefully plain sushi bar and dining room or descend to the tunnel-like basement for the “classier side” of teppanyaki. Other places trade on sex appeal or bargain-basement street food, but Defune’s impeccable reputation shines through on a menu that resolutely follows the well-trodden path through sushi and sashimi, soba and udon noodles, teriyaki and tempura, green salads anointed with vinegary dressings and other benchmarks of the old cuisine. Service is suitably polite and reserved, the overall quality is high and prices are “robust without seeming unfair”. Note that the dining room can often seem quite quiet, but that’s no bad thing – Defune was never designed as a party restaurant.

£50 - £79
Sushi
Japanese
£30 - £49
Pétrus

Pétrus

1 Kinnerton Street, Knightsbridge, London, SW1X 8EA

High expectations are matched by high standards at this Michelin-starred outpost of the Gordon Ramsay empire – a thickly carpeted, richly hued room with long skirted tables, sound-baffling furry walls and a huge circular wine store stacked with the titular Ch. Pétrus (and much, much more). Menus come topped and tailed with a panoply of dainty extras intended to supplement and complement “faultless” standouts such as seared curried scallop atop an umami-rich savoury sabayon with braised kombu and bacon, big-flavoured Herdwick lamb with beetroot and black garlic or fillet of Brixham turbot with pickled clams, samphire and lemongrass – all perfectly cooked and “meticulously presented” in the grand Ramsay manner. To finish, don’t miss the seasonal quince tart with poached rhubarb and ginger ice cream or the genius take on Black Forest gateau involving a light kirsch mousse, a dark cherry sorbet and more besides – although the small but interesting cheese selection is also worth a sniff. Those wanting the ultimate Pétrus experience should consider booking the eight-seater chef’s table in front of the kitchen – just brace yourself for a serious bill.  

Over £80
Modern European
French
One michelin star
SquareMeal Gold List
High Timber

High Timber

Paul's Walk, 8 High Timber Street, City of London, London, EC4V 3PA

A wall of glass gives a view across the Thames to Tate Modern, but if you look the other way there are some interesting South African artworks on the walls of this sleek contemporary space – although High Timber’s Cape connection really shows when it comes to the wine list, since the owners’ portfolio includes the Jordan wine estate. Homemade biltong is one of a few nods to the motherland on a menu that offers the comfort of a burger as well as Asian-inspired five-spice duck with pistachio yoghurt. It’s a broad church, with a fashionable salad to start alongside more luxurious seared foie gras with carpaccio, plus “very good” steaks from grass-fed herds leading the line among main courses. The walk-in wine cellar is home to an impressive collection, with good options by the glass and a few greatest hits from around the world supporting the South African majority.   

£50 - £79
Modern European
Cocoro

Cocoro

31 Marylebone Lane, London, W1U 2NH

“Really takes me back to life in Japan”, mused one well-travelled reader after visiting this bubbly oriental bolthole. Inside, Cocoro has a pleasingly offbeat, independent feel, whether you’re surrounded by Japanese students in the neutral ground-floor dining room or chilling in the sedate basement with its shoe-free tatami mats. Either way, expect a big menu with lots of pictures to help the uninitiated. Browse the list of nigiri, maki rolls and sashimi, try pork shabu-shabu salad with sesame dressing or go for some gyoza dumplings; otherwise opt for a bowl of udon noodle soup or a plate of sushi rice topped with breaded tonkatsu. Set menus proliferate at lunchtime, while dinner heralds some Euro/Asian crossovers in the guise of Camembert tempura or deep-fried chicken nanban with tartare sauce. The drinks list includes plenty of saké and shochu.

£30 - £49
Sushi
Japanese
Mr Chow

Mr Chow

151 Knightsbridge, London, SW1X 7PA

Like its evergreen septuagenarian owner, Michael Chow, this Knightsbridge institution seems to defy the sands of time. Almost 50 years down the line, it’s as handsome and elegant as ever with its chrome lampshades, monochrome colour schemes and artwork from the likes of Peter Blake. The restaurant’s rather sexy old-school demeanour lures in rich ‘new Knightsbridge’ types and corporate wallets – none of whom wince at the £30 price tag for a dish of citrus-flavoured crispy beef. The reason? When it comes to Chinese comfort food, few places can deliver quite like Mr Chow. There’s hardly a dish we don’t adore, from the sticky glazed prawns to lettuce wraps of minced spiced chicken, mixed seafood awash in a gooey white wine sauce, and – of course – the dessert trolley. Chow’s original vision of Chinese food served by Italian waiters happily lives on, epitomised by a charming maître d'.  

 

£50 - £79
Chinese
El Pirata

El Pirata

5-6 Down Street, London, W1J 7AQ

A favourite with Mayfair's Spanish community and converts to the new Iberian cause, El Pirata may not be as trendy as some of the young tapas upstarts in the capital, but it does the business by offering speedy service, authentic flavours and very fair prices into the bargain (note the set lunch deal for around a tenner). Staples such as albondigas, kidneys in sherry, grilled sardines and patatas bravas are supplemented by more enterprising daily specials including grilled pressa (shoulder of Iberian pork) or chicken breast wrapped in serrano ham with capers and Albariño jus – perfect with a bottle of Mahou beer, a tot of sherry, or something from the well-spread Spanish wine list. Eat in the lively ground-floor room surrounded by mirrors and Picasso prints, or bag a table outside when the weather's kind.

£30 - £49
Tapas
Spanish
£30 - £49
Ikeda

Ikeda

30 Brook Street, London, W1K 5DJ

Those seeking a side order of designer decor and celeb spotting à la Nobu will find little satisfaction at long-serving, family-run Ikeda, where ultra-traditional service and thoughtfully rendered food are the stars of the show. Revered dishes include flame-seared o-toro (tuna) steak gleaming with warm fat, grilled squid ‘legs’ with ginger, silky chawan mushi custard spiked with citrus, barbecued eel on rice with teriyaki sauce, and belly pork with garlic and miso. There’s also a top-drawer selection of sushi and sashimi loaded with spanking-fresh turbot, mackerel, shrimps, scallops and the like to go with Ikeda’s fascinating list of premium sakés and umeshu (plum wines). Mrs Ikeda and her smiling brigade of “delicate” waitresses in black kimonos run front of house, while busy action in the open kitchen adds some theatre to the discreet, understated room.

£30 - £49
Sushi
Japanese
Under £30
Rosa’s Thai Café Dean Street

Rosa’s Thai Café Dean Street

48 Dean Street, London, W1D 5BF

The various branches of this casual and affordably priced Thai café offer a warm welcome and a good mixture of the Thai top 10, plus some specialities you'd be hard-pressed to find elsewhere on the high street. Staples such as pad thai, som tam salad, stir-fries and green curries are carefully prepared and niftily spiced (for western palates, naturally), while more inventive options range from melt-in-the-mouth venison in a punchy pepper sauce to baked butternut squash filled with fragrant seafood mousse. The atmosphere is breezy and accommodating, with friendly staff, light modern furnishings and a boppy soundtrack helping to keep things upbeat. As for drinks, hot or iced teas and tropical juices have the edge over various boozy beverages. Rosa's also does a good line in lunchtime snacks, from satay wraps to hot-and-sour soup – ideal if you’re eating alone.

 

£30 - £49
Thai
Dinner by Heston Blumenthal at Mandarin Oriental

Dinner by Heston Blumenthal at Mandarin Oriental

Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, Knightsbridge, London, SW1X 7LA

With Heston Blumenthal’s name attached and a menu of eye-catching dishes that play with our perceptions of British cookery, Dinner was always going to be a hit with London’s gastro-tourists, and there are plenty of reasons for them to leave feeling satisfied – not least the beautiful daytime view of Hyde Park, the fun of the nitro-fuelled ice cream cart and the switched-on staff.

“Attention to detail is second to none”, observes a fan. Even if you don’t buy into the restaurant’s date-stamped reinterpretation of historical recipes, there’s a formidable cornucopia of gastronomic delights to relish – from the ‘meat fruit’ (c.1500) disguised as a mandarin with subtle citrus notes to the soft, juicy ‘tipsy cake’ (c.1810) with spit-roast pineapple. Also brace yourself for other extraordinary conceits ranging from ‘sherried’ scallop tartare with mushroom broth to chicken ‘oysters’ invigorated with horseradish cream and pickled walnuts. Sides are not to be sniffed at either – the mash is among the creamiest we’ve tasted. Obviously, such a “luxurious experience” doesn’t come cheap (especially if you commit to the wine flights), although set lunches offer a more accommodating prospect. Either way, prepare to be astonished. 

Over £80
British
Two michelin stars
SquareMeal Gold List
Boot & Flogger

Boot & Flogger

10-20 Redcross Way, Southwark, London, SE1 1TA

The original Boot & Flogger opened back in 1964, the first of many wine bars in Davy’s gentrified London empire. Today, the promise of superior imbibing remains satisfied, and it’s easy to see why this excellent wood-panelled watering hole is a favourite with the political and legal set, what with its fine upholstered furniture and list of limited-availability vintages (no hoppy draughts here). Dozens of affordable Old World wines by the glass are joined by a number of half-bottles, if time and clear-headedness are at a premium. The booze is matched by gentlemanly food offerings such as Morecambe Bay potted shrimps, game pies and cuts of rare sirloin, which simply add to the Flogger’s general air of geniality and old-fashioned charm.

£30 - £49
British
Wine Bars
The Gilbert Scott

The Gilbert Scott

St Pancras Renaissance London Hotel, Euston Road, London, NW1 2AR

Matching the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel’s awe-inspiring grandeur would be a tall order for any restaurant, but on current form, Marcus Wareing’s team can compete with the architectural splendour of this fabulous dining room. We swooned over plates of cooked-pink duck hearts and perky chanterelles on smoked bone marrow, before chomping on red mullet and roasted prawns perched on creamy brandade, and a dish of silky hake with pickled egg purée, summer vegetables and black pudding. As for pud, we’d advise saving room for the gorgeous praline tart with caramel ice cream. Lunchtime set deals such as mackerel with gooseberries and runner beans followed by lamb shoulder with glistening pea broth are worth it just to gawp at the room’s vast architraves, glorious art and gold lamé pillars, while suited service hits an informed (but informal) sweet spot. Linger over the chunky wine list or indulge in a swift flute of something English before the train.

£50 - £79
British
Afternoon tea
Habit

Habit

2-3 Friary Court, Crutched Friars, Aldgate, London, EC3N 2AE

A scattering of outside tables adds alfresco appeal to this snug, welcoming wine bar beneath a modern office building near Fenchurch Street station. Inside it has the look of a classic Davy’s, with sawdust on the floor & oak wine barrels serving as tables. A formal dining room to one side of the bar serves up char-grilled Donald Russell steaks, including a 35-day aged pavé rump & a 240g rib-eye. If your taste runs to lighter or less resolutely carnivorous fare the menu also touts sandwiches and salads. The creditable wine choice ranges from good-value, own-label bottles to an intriguing selection of finer wines.

£30 - £49
British
Wine Bars
£50 - £79
Benares

Benares

12a Berkeley Square House, Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London, W1J 6BS

A beacon for Asian fine dining since 2003, Michelin-starred Benares brings French-inspired refinement to spice-based cooking “without depleting the authenticity of Indian flavour”. The kitchen delivers “awesome food” and “real creativity” across the board, although tasting menus are the undoubted showcase for the kitchen's talents – from pan-seared scallops with broccoli couscous and pine-nut podi (dry powder) to a crisp, puffy chicken tikka pie or tandoori lamb cutlets with rich, rogan-inspired jus and creamy black dhal makhani. Inventive set lunches might include piri-piri quail with smoked beetroot or prawn curry with Bengali-spiced kimchi, while a dessert of tarte Tatin infused with anise and fennel typifies the crossover approach. Kindly, engaging staff deliver “spotless service” in the slick, smart, white-on-black dining room, while street food and quirky cocktails are the main business in the lounge bar. Wine picks tackle the spicing admirably. “Pricey, but perfect for special occasions”, says a fan.

£50 - £79
Indian
Halal
The Hat and Tun

The Hat and Tun

3 Hatton Wall, London, EC1N 8HX

Go-getting pub champions, Tom and Ed Martin, have revived The Hat & Tun in their signature style without losing an ounce of its Victorian charm. All the gussied-up trademarks are here, from a stuffed boar’s head to trendy designer lighting, although the sub-£10 lunch menu and lively cross-section of eccentric punters make this place more accessible than their glossier gaffs. Proper, unaffected pub grub is the order of the day; if they’re out of home-cured salt-beef doorstep sandwiches, go for a rare-breed burger, macaroni cheese or one of their freshly made pies (you can pre-order over the phone). Bag the leather armchair by the fire if it’s free, or have a natter with your neighbours at the bar over a big glass of Fuller’s London Pride or Adnams. ’Extremely accommodating’ staff are the icing on the cake.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
Joanna

Joanna's

56 Westow Hill, London, SE19 1RX

“Imagine a land untouched by small plates, sliders and kimchi cocktails – in this land you’ll find Joanna’s”, writes a fan. The ol' piano may be long gone, but a Rat Pack vibe lives on at this aptly named all-day brasserie with its “quietly classy” wood-panelled surrounds, ceiling fans and impressive cocktail bar. More than 30 years on, Crystal Palace locals still seek comfort in well-sourced steaks, burgers and “char-grilled Americana”, but there's plenty more to pique the interest. The Selsey crab mac ‘n’ cheese sounds fun, likewise roast pork belly with caramelised black pudding, savoy cabbage and grain mustard sauce. Off-peak deals major in nostalgia, daily breakfasts bring a dose of stateside indulgence, and Saturday brunch is a winning affair topped off by “towering” chocolate sundaes., Drinks include some of the best vodka-espresso shots in SE19, and service can’t be bettered – “whatever the occasion”.

£30 - £49
Modern European
China Tang at The Dorchester Hotel

China Tang at The Dorchester Hotel

53 Park Lane, Mayfair, London, W1K 1QA

Basement dining rooms must work hard to get noticed, and China Tang works harder than most in that department: down in the lower regions of The Dorchester, no inch of the restaurant goes unembellished. The inspiration is interbellum Shanghai, and while the dark wood and elaborate carpets aren’t looking box-fresh, it’s certainly an atmospheric way to kit out a dining space. China Tang’s food is straight-down-the-middle Cantonese, handled with care and served with a level of ceremony that suits the luxe hotel surroundings. To start, try delicate tomato and egg-drop soup, followed by golden prawns with salted egg yolk, stir-fried minced pigeon in lettuce wraps or, for a bit of fire and fragrance, fish braised with Szechuan peppercorns. Tang’s international clientele believe there’s no bad time for dim sum, so expect Shanghai dumplings, mango rolls, turnip cakes and roast pork buns right through the day. In the bar, cocktails are more fashion-forward than the food.

Over £80
Chinese
Dim Sum
Davy

Davy's at St James's

Crown Passage Vaults, Pall Mall, St. James's, London, SW1Y 6QY

With its restrained, dark-hued ambience, this branch of the trusted Davy’s chain is a popular haunt for the pinstriped brigade. Despite its proximity to St James’s Palace, prices here are good enough to suit parsimonious republicans: around £25 bags a cracking Rioja Crianza or Davy’s own deeply sinkable Pinot Grigio from a cannily collated list that includes three dozen by the glass & peaks with a patrician Chassagne-Montrachet at £75. To eat, Davy’s egalitarian nosh includes duck liver pâté, followed by 28-day aged steak, for example. And there are tankards of Davy’s Old Wallop or Whitstable Oyster Ale, too.

£30 - £49
British
Wine Bars
£30 - £49
Boyds Bar

Boyds Bar

8 Northumberland Avenue, London, WC2N 5BY

 

Occupying the dramatic marble lobby of what was once a palatial hotel (built 1887 in the grand Italianate style), Boyds certainly has the wow factor. The space around its substantial central island bar – there’s also a handsome Victorian-style ‘kitchen’ counter to one side – is given over to cocktailing and snacking. Although the decor (high tables, Starck-like ‘ghost’ chairs and 1960s-style upholstery) doesn’t quite live up to the majestic surroundings, this largely unsung old girl is a good-to-know spot for get-togethers off Trafalgar Square. Order Espresso or Porn Star Martini from a drinks list that offers a dozen wines by the glass and in flights, and bubbles from £8 a flute. For snacks, cheese and Trealy Farm meat boards are reasonable at just under £20 – as are small plates at £5 for the likes of smoked salmon tartare with mango, avocado and chilli; or beef and bone-marrow faggots in Bordelaise sauce.

Bars
Roux at Parliament Square

Roux at Parliament Square

11 Great George Street, Westminster, London, SW1P 3AD

Reliable and predictable, this Roux outpost runs like a well-oiled machine. Though Michel Roux Jnr is the figurehead, the kitchen is headed up by MasterChef: The Professionals winner Steve Groves, whose cooking is beyond reproach. Sit in the bar over cocktails or a glass of wine with something light to eat (an open smoked salmon sandwich, say); otherwise, join the corporate types and Westminster lobbyists in the dining room for the whole caboodle. The menu is chock-full of grand ingredients such as langoustine with prawn tortellini, Goosnargh chicken with liquid sweetcorn and delicate Parmesan dumplings to start, while mains range from roast turbot with dill and seaweed butter to the star turn of silky-soft confit suckling pig scented with star anise. Ripe cheeses and smart puds follow (roast peach with raspberries, Muscat and oats, say), while the steeply priced wine list is built to impress.

£50 - £79
Modern European
Gaucho Charlotte Street

Gaucho Charlotte Street

60a Charlotte Street, Fitzrovia, London, W1T 2NU

Set among concrete office blocks on the ‘wrong’ end of Charlotte Street, the Bloomsbury outpost of the Gaucho chain is a buzzy medialand haunt par excellence. The unassuming ground-floor lobby belies the ‘wow’ factor of the dining room below: descend into a cavernous, double-height space decked out in trademark black & white, with cowhide seating & pendulous light fittings casting a low, warm glow over diners, while ultra-attentive staff are keen to describe & show off the available cuts, from melt-in-the mouth lomo (fillet) to traditional churrascaria (a marinated spiral cut). Start with something Latin (a tangy ceviche made with thumb-sized queenie scallops or light crab & chilli salad with soft-boiled quail’s egg), & round off with sweet, creamy dulche de leche flan. Pre- or post-prandial cocktails can be sipped in the mezzanine cocktail bar.

£50 - £79
Steak
South American
Argentinian
Bright Courtyard Club

Bright Courtyard Club

43-45 Baker Street, Marylebone, London, W1U 8EW

Aiming to emulate the Shanghai original, this huge, high-gloss outpost of the Bright Courtyard Club comes complete with some lovely porcelain pieces, tea sets for sale, huge chunks of polished wood, screens and stools, plus an atrium for for dim sum. Naturally, much of the cooking has a Shanghai-style slant (dumplings, marinated tofu, smoked fish etc), and the menu has lots of luxe touches including Madagascan jumbo prawns with black truffle dressing; otherwise, expect intriguing ideas such as edamame with zhouzhuang pickles, braised sea cucumber in abalone sauce, dry-fried lobster with egg yolk or pork belly with ‘grandmum’s recipe’. Sadly the food is reckoned to be “OK, at best”, with long waits and “rude” service ruining it for one couple. Drinks-wise, a wine wall suggests an interest in the subject, but tea is also taken seriously.

£50 - £79
Chinese
Asadal

Asadal

227 High Holborn, London, WC1V 7DA

Long before Korean food became a “funky” fixture of the London dining scene, Asadal was already spreading the gospel of kimchi – though you might easily walk right past its unassuming entrance hidden next to Holborn station. "Descend the steps and you could almost be in Seoul", notes one reader. The key to genuine Korean cooking is balance, and the extensive menu in this softly lit, wood-panelled basement dining room is “still delivering”, with bags of choice from savoury pa jeon (seafood pancakes) to sweet-and-sour tang su yook beef or spicy pork and beancurd hotpot. We’re also partial to hands-on favourites, including the sizzling bibimbap (layers of steak, vegetables and rice that you mix together in a stone pot) and the deftly marinated pork belly cooked barbecue-style on the hotplate at your table. Good-value lunch box deals are a great way to explore what's on offer. It may not be “cutting edge”, but Asadal’s food has “authenticity” in spades, concludes one convert.

£30 - £49
Korean
Corrigan

Corrigan's Mayfair

28 Upper Grosvenor Street, Mayfair, London, W1K 7EH

It’s hard to imagine Richard Corrigan seated in the restaurant that bears his name – at first glance, the blue-toned dining room and polished expanses seem too elegant to contain him. But there’s something of the chef’s robustness in a heartily seasonal menu, the odd visual pun and a chef’s trolley which might proffer shoulder of suckling pig or Dover sole meunière. Corrigan’s puts nature’s larder on the table in a way that suits “occasions when you want to be spoilt”. Influences are wide-ranging, so you might find chicken congee with scallop or roasted boneless quail with red curry and prawn toast ahead of perfectly timed Cornish cod with stuffed baby squid or one of the justly renowned game specialities: if you’re going to have hare in Mayfair, have it here, or try roast wild duck with pumpkin, celery and walnut. Presentation is appealing, but a fair distance from fussy – and the same can be said of a wine list grouped loosely by style.

£50 - £79
British
Pearl Liang

Pearl Liang

8 Sheldon Square, London, W2 6EZ

Pearl Liang is not your normal Chinese drop-in. Firstly, there’s the room – a subterranean space that makes up for its lack of natural light with sexy purple upholstery and snazzy flower-blossom designs. Then there’s the ‘sublime’ cooking, which goes the extra mile for authenticity as it romps through the Chinese regional repertoire, taking in everything from excellent crispy duck with homemade pancakes to sweet-and-sour chicken jazzed up with pomegranate. Premium seafood also abounds – from steamed razor clams and scallops stuffed with crabmeat to a hatful of turbot specialities – and the kitchen is happy to go walkabout for the likes of lobster sashimi. The lengthy line-up of dim sum is a lunchtime crowd-puller (think prawn and radish dumplings, chicken’s feet, fried octopus cakes and BBQ pork puffs), and there are some classic cocktails for a post-work refresher.

£30 - £49
Chinese
Dim Sum
Mug House

Mug House

1-3 Tooley Street, Southwark, London, SE1 2PF

‘Old English ale served daily in the proper manner’ proclaims the sign outside this particular Davy’s outpost, which stands as one of the last bastions of antiquated pubbery. Hidden under an archway that serves as a final reminder of the original London Bridge, it nevertheless courts the tourist trade as well as local imbibers. Inside, the low ceilings, conspiratorial nooks & upturned barrels provide historical ambience, though the people lifting pewter mugs of Old Wallop are likely to be dressed in sharp modern suits. Recognisable labels such as Whitstable Bay ale & Weston’s organic cider decorate the pumps, although most people are here for the admirable Davy’s wine list. The kitchen also serves up a decent & varied selection of Med-style sharing platters, meaty mains & sandwiches to line the stomach.

£30 - £49
British
Wine Bars
The Greenhouse

The Greenhouse

27a Hay's Mews, Mayfair, London, W1J 5NY

It has sported two Michelin Stars since 2004, so expectations invariably run high at The Greenhouse. However, the arrival of new head chef Alex Dilling (ex-Hélène Darroze at The Connaught) has taken the set-up to a different level. Of course, some things never change: the sense of Zen-like calm as visitors arrive at this Mayfair “oasis” via a beautifully landscaped garden; the spacious and light dining room, and the highly professional attitude of the staff. What felt notably different, though, was the buzz – it was encouraging to see almost every table occupied on a midweek evening.

  

 

Dilling’s culinary approach involves sourcing the very best ingredients, combining them with an innovative flourish and presenting them beautifully. A super-soft yet deeply flavoursome smoked sturgeon mousse with crab and dill set the tone, and there were several high points to follow: we were bowled over by a breath-takingly original truffled egg concoction and a plate of Brittany turbot with boudin noir, girolles and young sorrel.

 

 

The vegetarian options also impressed, as did the wine pairings, drawn from one of London’s more voluminous lists (clocking in at 3,400+ bottles). On the downside, our A5 Gunma Wagyu beef was rather bland, and impatient diners may be troubled by the relatively long waits between courses. Still, The Greenhouse remains a bastion of serious fine dining – just be prepared to fork out handsomely.  

Over £80
Modern European
Two michelin stars
SquareMeal Gold List
Seven Park Place by William Drabble

Seven Park Place by William Drabble

St. James's Hotel & Club, 7-8 Park Place, St. James's, London, SW1A 1LS

Embedded within the wedding-cake surrounds of the St James's Hotel, this freestanding restaurant drips sobriety and good manners. Restraint is the watchword – even if your eyes have to cope with a mishmash of patterned carpets, patterned banquettes and dramatic patterned wallpaper in the petite, nine-table dining room. William Drabble delivers “the most incredible, genuine French food”, sourcing from the UK, but applying several coats of contemporary Gallic lacquer to his Michelin-starred food: scallops are marinated in blood-orange vinegar and served with Dorset crab and blood-orange mayo; saddle of Lune Valley lamb arrives with onions, turnips and thyme; roast veal sweetbreads are studded with truffle and partnered by crispy chicken wings, salt-baked celeriac and roasted chicken emulsion. To finish, try coffee-soaked savarin with coffee cream and caramelised hazelnuts. “Professional, dedicated staff” provide the icing on the cake.

£50 - £79
French
One michelin star
Davy

Davy's at Plantation Place

Unit 8, Plantation Place, City of London, London, EC3R 7BD

Perfunctory Victorian decor is juxtaposed with the modernist building at this popular City wine bar-cum-restaurant. Having racked up over 150 years’ experience as wine merchants, Davy’s can be depended on to deliver. A selection of more than 50 by-the-glass tipples covers everything from frisky Chilean whites to sturdy French stalwarts – viscous, velvety Vacqueyras, say – as well as Champagne from £50 or so per bottle. Graze on tapas-sized savouries (black pudding Scotch egg, for instance, or mushrooms on toast with walnut pesto); alternatively, order sharing boards, burgers and steaks, fritto misto, or main course portions of bangers and mash with Madeira gravy, or mushroom and courgette risotto. There’s posset, tarts and cheeses for afters – and private rooms if a party’s on the cards.

£30 - £49
British
Wine Bars
The George and Vulture City

The George and Vulture City

3 Castle Court, London, EC3V 9DL

There has been an inn on the corner of Castle Court and St Michael's Alley since time immemorial, but it's the association with Dickens – who mentions it in The Pickwick Papers – that has kept the George & Vulture on London's must-visit list. As one of the City's few surviving chop houses, it's a trip down memory lane – and first impressions don't disappoint, from the sepia-tint interior, wainscot panelling and white napery to the straightforward British fare on the menu. Yet this maverick old stager isn't entirely set in aspic, offering the likes of seared scallops with black pudding and pea purée or warm goats' cheese and carrot salad alongside its Barnsley chops, meaty pies, Cumberland sausages and mixed grills. Wines are limited to one of each colour, while fellow diners are a mixed bunch of curiosity-seeking tourists and City gents who wouldn't countenance eating anywhere else.

£30 - £49
British
Aqua Kyoto

Aqua Kyoto

240 Regent Street (entrance 30 Argyll Street), Oxford Circus, London, W1B 3BR

As far removed from the Zen minimalist school as it gets, Aqua Kyoto does high-end Japanese with a bit of razzmatazz. Feel the vibe as you circumnavigate the central bar, past gorgeous kimono silk-padded booths, to reach the dramatic dining room with its showpiece sunken sushi bar crowned by an oversize red lantern. The clubby mood conjures up shades of Tokyo’s swanky Ginza district, likewise the menu’s luxurious bent. Go for broke by ordering king crab tempura with crab miso, Wagyu maki rolls and agedashi aubergine with roasted foie gras, or discover original creations ranging from chilli yuzu lamb teriyaki with Japanese artichokes to rabbit with green peach, pumpkin tofu and mustard ankake sauce. By contrast, lunchtime bento boxes and sashimi selections are gentler on the wallet. The terrace is perfect for a sundowner.

£50 - £79
Japanese
Chisou Beauchamp Place

Chisou Beauchamp Place

31 Beauchamp Place, London, SW3 1NU

‘A winner every time’, the ever-busy Knightsbridge branch of Chisou is a three-tiered offering in one smart townhouse, and covers all Japanese bases for a mixed bag of salarymen, local aficionados and saké enthusiasts. A textured stone wall, wooden booths, ornamental saké bottles and lanterns set the scene in the chic ground-floor dining room, where the menu features on-trend flavours such as rock oyster ‘shooters’, yellowtail and truffle sashimi, rock shrimp tempura and grilled eel glazed with BBQ sauce, as well as rich, complex Wagyu beef teriyaki with shiitake and shimeji mushrooms from a list of ‘irresistible’ specials. Upstairs, an elegant varnished bar dispenses more than 30 varieties of saké to novices and connoisseurs alike, while the basement houses a dedicated sushi bar serving ozone-fresh turbot, razor clams, butter fish, tuna and other raw delights.

£50 - £79
Japanese
Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester

Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester

The Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane, Mayfair, London, W1K 1QA

The combination of a superstar name and three Michelin stars means that expectations are always sky-high at Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester; in return, diners are treated to “an exercise in superlative service and presentation”, with hushed tones barely disturbing the reverential calm in the classic creamy-toned dining room – an “oasis of serenity” away from the bluster of Park Lane. Head chef Jean-Phillipe Blondet is his master’s voice, delivering a measured parade of profound and deeply flavoured dishes hinting at the “culinary genius” behind the scenes – just consider the “heavenly” sauté gourmand of lobster accompanied by homemade pasta and truffled chicken quenelles or the signature ‘contemporary’ vacherin with a coconut boule, pomegranate seeds and exotic fruits. In between, the ever-fabulous rib and saddle of venison with coffee sauce and a peanut-stuffed parsnip vies with fish classics such as fillet of turbot with beetroot and clams marinière or line-caught sea bass with braised chicory. Prices, as you’d expect of somewhere called Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester, take no prisoners, and the platinum wine list promises a galaxy of French stars with hefty mark-ups – although fans still think that dining here is “time exceptionally well spent”.   

Over £80
French
Three michelin stars
Champagne Charlies

Champagne Charlies

17 The Arches, Villiers Street, Charing Cross, London, WC2N 6NG

Part of the dependable Davy’s stable, this sprawling basement bar in the arches beneath Charing Cross station features the group’s signature styling with sawdust floors, wood panelling, exposed brick & antiquarian knick-knacks. As the name suggests, there’s a range of fizz on the wine list – from reasonably priced Davy’s Célébration NV to Roederer’s Cristal at £200 – alongside interesting international reds & whites, bolstered by quality own-label bottles. Ports, sherries & Madeira feature too, while draft ales such as Old Wallop will please beer buffs. A revamped menu emphasises classic British dishes: think slow-cooked chicken leg in red wine, grilled chicken club or bangers & mash with Madeira gravy and homemade onion rings. Cooking doesn’t disappoint & swift service keeps local workers happy. ‘A cosy, reliable spot,’ concludes one reader.

£30 - £49
British
Wine Bars
£50 - £79
Bangers Bar & Grill

Bangers Bar & Grill

2 Wilson Street, Liverpool Street, London, EC2M 2TE

Following a refurb, this basement branch of the Davy’s stable has brightened up its image: a mirrored staircase now leads down to the spacious bar area, which sports a sympathetic mix of contemporary design and classic Davy’s features. Now billed as a ‘Bar & Grill’, Bangers also touts a revamped menu of updated British classics ranging from fish and triple cooked chips to slow-cooked chicken leg in red wine, shallots, bacon and mushrooms with roasted garlic and spring onion mash. Steaks and the eponymous bangers also feature, along with puds such as sticky toffee pudding. British real ales and continental lagers are alternatives to the beefed-up Davy’s wine list – a satisfying whistle-stop tour of the major growing regions, headed up by keenly priced own-label selections. Bangers also boasts four private spaces, including the aptly named Penguin Room.

£30 - £49
British
Wine Bars
Over £80
HIX Soho

HIX Soho

66-70 Brewer Street, Soho, London, W1F 9UP

For grown-up class with a hefty dollop of style and heritage, this Mark Hix outpost still cuts it. High ceilings and modern art from Hix’s YBA mates create a "perfect combination of cool and down-to-earth" that ensures a packed house throughout the week. Meanwhile, the patriotic menu keeps it seasonal and regional: start with snacks of snap-apart crackling dipped in apple sauce, and moreish cockle popcorn, before moving on to starters such as crispy Lyme Bay squid pepped up with spicy mayonnaise or a tangy helping of prawn cocktail.

 

To follow, there is a concise selection of stellar steaks or opt for the likes of lusciously fatty pork belly with a pea salad, or a prawn burger with fiery Scotch bonnet tartar sauce. Sweet-toothed diners will fall for the ‘credit crunch’ vanilla ice cream, which comes topped with chunks of honeycomb and lashings of warm chocolate sauce, while service has improved of late. Post-meal, a tipple or two in Mark’s Bar downstairs is a must. 

 

Try an extremely smooth ‘Mischief’ G&T, a collaboration between Hix and Salcombe Gin to commemorate 10 years of Hix restaurants.

£50 - £79
British
Norfolk Arms

Norfolk Arms

28 Leigh Street, London, WC1H 9EP

If it weren't for the legs of Ibérico ham hanging in the window and the meat slicer on the counter, you might think the Norfolk Arms was just another jam-packed Bloomsbury boozer, with its tiled facade, ornate plastered ceilings and prim window boxes. Spanish influences hold sway in the kitchen, with a lengthy tapas menu delivering Padrón peppers, chorizo in cider and Serrano ham croquetas alongside international big-hitters including taramasalata, Scotch eggs with mustard and spare ribs with crackling. The more conventional daily menu also casts its net wide, moving from tiger prawns with guacamole via braised beef cheeks or free-range chicken breast stuffed with black pudding to salted caramel ice cream with toasted sesame seeds. Familiar draught beers are outshone by a sharp globetrotting wine list with plenty by the glass or carafe.

£30 - £49
Gastropub
Bob Bob Ricard

Bob Bob Ricard

1 Upper James Street, London, W1F 9DF

“That restaurant with the Champagne buttons” is more than just a gimmick, although ostentation is undoubtedly blingy Bob Bob Ricard’s primary selling point: “I feel like I’m in Gatsby’s dining room”, notes one fan. Luckily, the palpable sense of enjoyment lends warmth to the glitz and gold, which is everywhere you look. Cloistered royal blue booths explain why celebs enjoy hiding out here, as does a sumptuous menu of comfort food – think mighty beef Wellingtons and deep-filled, steaming pies. A new executive chef has introduced some lighter (but no less lavish) additions to the menu in the shape of, say, lemon sole stuffed with scallop mousse or lobster in a sparky Champagne sauce. The Sunday roast lunch stars prime USDA Black Angus beef, drizzled with truffle gravy, while the pricey wine list favours treats from the French regions. Service glides effortlessly, and although prices are reasonably high, it’s worth it for the fun you’ll have.

£50 - £79
International
Barshu Restaurant

Barshu Restaurant

28 Frith Street, London, W1D 5LF

Strictly a domain for chilli-heads, this smart, light-filled Chinese delivers a riotous flavour ride, Szechuan-style. Complaints of “lucky dip” portion sizes have been addressed with the introduction of illustrated menus, which also help to identify the hottest propositions. Dry-wok options (stir-fried frog’s legs, pig’s offal and duck tongues) all arrive emblazoned with dried chilli, as do fleshy strips of boiled sea bass and appetisers such as sliced pork belly, nestled in a blood-red sauce. Moments of relief come in the shape of soothing soups, and stews, and you’ll probably be glad to see mango sorbet and coconut ice cream offered for dessert. The restaurant makes no bones about the fact that it uses MSG and aims to turn your table within two hours – two drawbacks that will be familiar to anyone who frequents neighbouring Chinatown. High prices are out of sync with the neighbourhood, but you’re paying for an “authentic”, thoroughly thrilling taste of central China.

Szechuan
Chinese
Oscar at the Charlotte Street Hotel

Oscar at the Charlotte Street Hotel

Charlotte Street Hotel, 15-17 Charlotte Street, Fitzrovia, London, W1T 1RJ

Smart doormen and uniform awnings spell class at the Charlotte Street Hotel, and its buzzing bar is no different. Named after that famous literary booze-hound Oscar Wilde, Oscar at the Charlotte Street Hotel plays host to smart suits and well-heeled ladies sipping fizz, as well as tourists at the wealthier end of the spectrum. Afternoon tea accompanied by pink Champagne or a White Chocolate Martini is a popular pastime, but Oscar at the Charlotte Street Hotel gets really rammed after the offices close down. The bartenders clearly know their cocktails, but we'd single out the Charlotte Bramble – a signature concoction of fig-infused Bombay Sapphire gin, blackberries and crème de mûre, best enjoyed with nibbles such as crispy chilli squid or aloo tikki Scotch egg. If the thought of skiving bothers you, just remember Oscar Wilde's mantra – 'work is the curse of the drinking classes'.

£50 - £79
Modern European
Kiku

Kiku

17 Half Moon Street, London, W1J 7BE

A minimalist blend of Japanese blond wood and lattice screens, Kiku’s two-tier dining room puts on two very different faces. By day, business lunchers pile in for well-regarded set deals that require a modest outlay and half an hour of your time. The Kiku ‘special’ is a top shout, offering mixed tempura, miso soup, sushi and teriyaki-braised chicken, but you can also dip into abundant raw fish, donburi rice bowls or noodle soups. By night, a more moneyed crowd arrives to indulge in glistening sashimi platters, sunomono salads, tempura and bubbling shabu-shabu hotpots. Alternatively, kaiseki banquet menus offer a more extensive tour of the cuisine and its premium plates. Prices are reasonable, and a seat at the sushi bar adds extra value: “just go easy on the wasabi – it’s strong!” warns a fan.

£30 - £49
Sushi
Japanese
Vats Wine Bar & Restaurant

Vats Wine Bar & Restaurant

51 Lamb's Conduit Street, London, WC1N 3NB

A venue for reliving the golden days when business lunches took all afternoon, Vats is no place for food snobs, but attracts wine buffs who appreciate a glass or two of the serious stuff. Plates of old-school British grub (lamb’s liver & bacon with mash, steak & kidney pud) play second fiddle to an impressive list of bottles from the greatest winemaking regions of the world. The big French estates dominate, but there are also some interesting names from further afield, such as Cloudy Bay Te Koko (a complex, barrel-fermented white from the famous Kiwi producer) or Contino Reserva (a warm & full-bodied single-vineyard red from Rioja). The higgledy-piggledy collection of rooms looks rather dated, but you can always escape to the alfresco tables out front.

Wine Bars
Gauthier Soho

Gauthier Soho

21 Romilly Street, Soho, London, W1D 5AF

Step through the unassuming, glossy-black door and you’ll discover a high-end French restaurant in what looks and feels like a moneyed Soho resident’s front room – albeit one with lots of tables. This is the elegant domain of Alexis Gauthier, an Alain Ducasse protégé with a penchant for vegetarian and vegan cuisine alongside more conventional offerings. The seasonal carte might include pancetta tortellini in a deeply aromatic chicken jus, pink-roasted loin and rack of Welsh lamb with spiced butternut squash, dates, pistachio and braised spelt or sparkling-fresh wild halibut with salsify and girolles, each labelled with a calorie count – a detail that typifies Gauthier’s nutrition-conscious ethos. More indulgent diners shouldn’t miss the “heavenly” Louis XV chocolate praline, while oenophiles will have plenty of fun with a hefty list that favours the Old World; also, marvel at the “amazing” breads and “fabulous array” of French cheeses. Super-polite service, hushed voices and loud prices signal old-style, special-occasion dining.

£50 - £79
Vegetarian
Vegan
French
The Delaunay

The Delaunay

55 Aldwych, Aldwych, London, WC2B 4BB

Like its sibling The Wolseley, this "lovely buzzy restaurant" bears all the hallmarks of a Corbin & King success story, from "spot-on" service to please-all cooking for a big-city crowd. No wonder The Delaunay has become a perennial favourite on all counts: the welcome is "always friendly" and the David Collins interior "impresses straightaway" with its glossy dark wood, gleaming brass and polished stone floors. There's an "old-school Viennese" vibe here, so expect to find wiener schnitzel, choucroute and rich borscht, as well as traditional dishes from elsewhere in Europe such as chicken Kiev and the ever-popular kedgeree. Tempting patisserie and viennoiserie – including an exemplary sachertorte – are worth a visit alone: luckily the adjoining Counter at The Delaunay sells many of these goodies to go. We urge you to book ahead for the phenomenally popular pre-theatre slot, or start your day in splendid fashion with a gut-busting breakfast. In short, "a great London institution".

£50 - £79
Modern European
Afternoon tea
SquareMeal Gold List
Gaucho Tower Bridge

Gaucho Tower Bridge

2 More London Riverside, London, London, SE1 2AP

Gaucho by name, but not by nature – this super-suave, ‘über-masculine’ riverside steakhouse is more gloss than grasslands. The odd patch of brushed cowhide is one hat-tip to the cowboys from which the restaurant takes its name; the rest is a vision of black, glittering chandeliers and leather. This eponymous chain peddles ‘the finest Argentinian steaks’, with a healthy range of cuts from more traditional rib-eyes and fillets to less-common cuadril (tail of rump) and lomo (tenderloin). The Gaucho sampler is always popular with steak fans, who have described it as a ‘must-do experience’ – although ‘largely forgettable’ sides get the thumbs-down. To counter meat fatigue, starters tend to be light and refreshing: ceviche of scallops with mango and yellow pepper, say. As expected, the bullish wine list is an impressive collection of Argentina’s finest reds.

£50 - £79
Steak
Argentinian
Lucky Voice Soho

Lucky Voice Soho

52 Poland Street, London, W1F 7NQ

Lady Gaga or Radio Ga Ga? The Ting Tings or My Ding-a-Ling? Either way, murder your musical heroes in a state-of-the-art booth at Lucky Voice. Come early doors, when costs are as low as £5 per person per hour, & you can knock back Jim Morrison’s favourite, Jim Beam – mixed with cinnamon, Drambuie & honey in a Soho speakeasy martini. Parties of all sizes (& vocal abilities) can be accommodated, & larynx-lubricating long drinks include Tokyo mule, kimono & J-Pop (an alco tuck-shop treat topped with giant Parma violets). Bag a bottle of Belvedere or Beefeater 24 (£145, mixers included) plus one of the deep-pan pizzas if you’re in for the long haul. Kirin & Asahi are the boy-band beers, while £15.95 will get you a bottle of Spanish house vino.

Bars
Amaranto

Amaranto

Four Seasons Hotel, Hamilton Place, Park Lane, London, London, W1J 7DR

Spread across the ground floor of the extensively refurbished Four Seasons Hotel, Amaranto has bags of international polish and jet-setting pizzazz. Deep reds, black lacquering and leather-topped tables scream kitsch opulence, while the kitchen delivers a contemporary take on regional Italian cuisine. Antipasti of octopus with salsify and puttanesca sauce or tuna and grilled peaches with quinoa and sweet-and-sour dressing set the tone, while pasta might include green tagliolini with crab, baby spinach and tomato fondue. Mains range from fritto misto and Ligurian shellfish broth to porchetta with apple compote and baby vegetables, while cheeses and desserts stay with the patriotic theme. Best of all is the mighty regional Italian wine list, which offers full access by the glass if you wish. The restaurant sits cheek-by-jowl with several intimate salons, a lounge and a bar.

£50 - £79
Italian
The Five Fields

The Five Fields

8-9 Blacklands Terrace, Chelsea, London, SW3 2SP

“Still on the up and up” confirms a regular visitor to Five Fields – an elegant but homely neighbourhood restaurant that “really does feel very special”. Muted grey and beige colour schemes set a soothing tone in the bijou dining room, although all eyes are on the gloriously fresh-flavoured food coming out of chef/proprietor Taylor Bonnyman’s kitchen. Much depends on seasonal pickings from the owner’s Sussex garden – floral tributes and herbal embellishments that make an impact in dishes as diverse as Lindisfarne oyster with green herbs, sea lettuce and radish or a disarmingly simple ‘late summer’ plate of tomato, pea and watermelon. Bonnyman’s sense of adventure and his culinary intelligence also show in unexpected pairings such as beef with peanut, broccoli and tamarind or red grouse overlaid with the contrasting flavours and textures of carrot, yoghurt and cucumber. To finish, ‘chocolate, sesame and smoke’ sounds darkly dramatic, but there’s fruity freshness too – as in Charentais melon with orange flower blossom, raspberry and praline. Staff are gracious, genuine and accommodating – a real boon when it comes to picking from the comprehensive 500-bin wine list. “Surprising and charming in equal measure” says a fan – a verdict we’re happy to endorse.

£50 - £79
British
One michelin star