The Prince Arthur 22

95 Forest Road , London, E8 3BH

3 reviews

Pubs Hackney Dalston

The Prince Arthur pub Hackney exterior sign

SquareMeal Review of The Prince Arthur

Andy Bird has snapped up this handsome mid-Victorian Hackney hostelry, introducing subtle decorative tweaks and updates that make for a belting backstreet boozer worthy of wider acclaim. Bird’s track record – co-owner of irrepressible Hoxton cocktail joint Happiness Forgets, saviour of The Chesham Arms – bodes well for the Prince. A fine range of hoppy worthies also helps: Belgian-inspired Bristolian brewer Lost and Grounded’s Running With Spectres perhaps, or The Five Points Brewing Co from a roster of local heroes on rotation. Sensibly priced classic and modern pub food is served in the cosy, convivial saloon. For three months from December 2017 (pending the arrival of the in-house chef), Rita’s Dining fires up the stoves with dishes that typify future plans: hearty French onion soup or Jerusalem artichoke, pumpkin, curds and pecans to start; mains of roast cod with burnt leeks and butter sauce or chicken parmigiana in a rich tomato sauce.

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Nearby Tube/Rail Stations

Hackney Downs Station 435m

Hackney Central Station 525m

Address

Address: 95 Forest Road , London E8 3BH

Area: Hackney Dalston

Opening times

Mon-Fri 4-11pm (Fri 3pm- ) Sat-Sun 12N-11pm

Nearby Landmarks

Bullion Room Theatre 605m

Hackney Empire Theatre 632m

Details

Telephone: 020 7249 9996

Website:

Cuisine: Pubs

9.0

Food & Drink: 9.0

Service: 9.3

Atmosphere: 8.7

Value: 9.0

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 3.0

Value: 4.0

LamBert 12 April 2010

The Prince Arthur had sold out of Aberdeen Angus. Not a problem for me – shit happens – and my wing-man soon came around. But being someone of faith that any Pub with requisite sense of its onions will go all out to cover all bases, I also know that whenever you sell numbers on a steak dish it means only one thing; there's not enough else to choose from. I respect a short menu. But if you're going to be concise you've got to be commercial. The trouble is that the ‘28 day aged Rib of Beef, Peppercorn Sauce and Hand-Cut Chips ( for two to share )’ (£38) was head and shoulders the most inviting thing on it. What was presumably the last portion was ferried past us as we walked in. It looked awesome. Everybody thought so. Everybody, it seemed, shared it. It was no more and it wasn't 8.30pm. In its absence, then, there was a decision to be made. I still want carrion, I know that. I've been shifting furniture all afternoon. What else is there? ‘Jugged Hare’. Absolutely clueless as to what that means. Didn't even bother with the accoutrements. Braised Cumbrian Chicken (with Chicken and Tarragon Mousse? You go to the trouble of making a cavity and then fill it with itself ?) What else is there? In the way of meat, I'd had it. There's a traditional Fish and Chips (£12.50), but we had that last night (Fish House, Lauriston Road), and there's a blonde Skate Wing from Guernsey (£15) who, despite bringing with her brown shrimp, egg, and a dill and horseradish dressing, I know from experience will be all skin and bone. So what did I end up with? Bubble and Squeak. What else ? Me old muckers B and S. With a crispy Hen's Egg – a perfectly runny, homemade ‘scotchie’ – and Hollandaise. £11 nicker. Chim-chim-cheroo. Chuffed, I was, an'all. And you can spare me your faux-cockney, anti-veggie panto protestations because it was, to quote Alfie Doolittle, ‘lavverly’. They pull it off here at the Arthur for number of reasons. Firstly, the greeting as we entered was all smiles and personality. They wanted us to stay and eat. They wanted to help. Us and each other. And I'll forgive anybody anything for that. Second, while for a pub it feels a bit too clever and can appear a bit frilly on the plate , there are no shortage of classics – pints of Prawns are sold with Mayo, Rock Oysters with Shallot Vinegar by the half dozen – and there's absolutely no disputing the quality of the cooking. Pan Fried Chicken Livers, Sauteed Wild Mushrooms, Toasted Brioche, Madeira Reduction (£6) as a starter were a sensation. Sweet. The other fella's Wood Pigeon and Guinea Fowl Terrine with Sourdough (£7), equally so. He did go for the Chicken, which he demolished and, as I say, mine did exactly what it ought'a. This is a proper East End pub. Upscale and distinctly English it, and its food offer, sits beautifully within its sorely sophisticated habitat. A better range of ales would be preferable – there was one, Fuller's, of the four pumps in use – but the wine list showed decent variety; the Gamay warmed the back of my throat when the beer had ceased to cut it. The smartly dressed diners in attendance when we arrived later gave way to card schools and characters looking to catch dessert before the kitchen closed, and the Deep Fried Chocolate Sandwich with Praline Ice Cream looked like a confection worth coming back for. If only they'd convinced the man on the stove to replace a Fish dish with a Lamb or Pork, maybe stick in a gourmet Burger, and I wouldn't have had to kick off on a mildly negative note. These girls smile so sweetly, though, when they told us the Rib was off it rather felt like they were doing us a favour.

Food & Drink: 5.0

Service: 5.0

Atmosphere: 5.0

Value: 5.0

Imogen C. 11 February 2010

I love this place. It is exactly what a London local should be. You can feel the history – the ghosts of the past – still drifting through the place (in a good way). Many a tale has been whispered in here… Apart from the wonderful character, and it's location, which is actually in and amongst houses, as opposed to a built up ‘drinking area’, they have some excellent drinks, and delicious food too. Sunday roasts are fantastic! Can't recommend highly enough.

Food & Drink: 4.0

Service: 4.0

Atmosphere: 4.0

Value: 4.0

Brian T. 27 September 2009

It's a near perfect little old pub. It's cozy and quiet, and has a really good menu too. Lovely.

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